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New York's 9th congressional district

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

New York's 9th congressional district
New York US Congressional District 9 (since 2013).tif
New York's 9th congressional district since January 3, 2013
Representative
  Yvette Clarke
DBrooklyn
Distribution
  • 100% urban
  • 0% rural
Population (2019)720,316[1]
Median household
income
$69,754[2]
Ethnicity
Cook PVID+32[3]

New York's 9th congressional district is a congressional district for the United States House of Representatives in New York City, represented by Yvette Clarke.

The district is located entirely within Brooklyn. It includes the neighborhoods of Brownsville, Crown Heights, East Flatbush, Flatbush, Kensington, Park Slope, Prospect Heights, Midwood, Sheepshead Bay, Marine Park, Gerritsen Beach, and Prospect Lefferts Gardens. Prospect Park, Grand Army Plaza and the Grand Army Plaza Greenmarket, the worldwide headquarters of the Chabad-Lubavitch Hasidic community, and the Brooklyn Children's Museum are located within this district, as well as, in the Prospect Heights neighborhood, the Brooklyn Museum of Art, the Brooklyn Botanic Garden, and the Central Library, or main branch, of the Brooklyn Public Library.

Prior to 2013, the district consisted primarily of middle-class white neighborhoods, including large Jewish, Italian, Irish, and Russian populations, in southern Brooklyn and south central Queens. Before redistricting, the Queens Tribune found that the district increasingly swung Republican following the September 11 attacks in 2001, when many police and firefighters were lost from the Rockaways.[4] Its rightward shift was also attributed to the increasing tendency of Orthodox Jews to vote for Republicans.[5] Its representation in Congress was reliably Democratic for decades, electing prominent liberals such as Chuck Schumer and Anthony Weiner, and, prior to that, Emanuel Celler and Elizabeth Holtzman (when the district was differently numbered). Anthony D. Weiner was Congressman from 1999 until he resigned on June 21, 2011. Republican Bob Turner succeeded Weiner after winning the special election on September 13, 2011. However, the previous 9th District was eliminated, after New York lost two districts in 2010 redistricting, and its territory was divided among several neighboring districts.

After redistricting, Yvette Clarke now represents the district. The district has an African-American majority, and also includes most of the territory previously within the 11th District. It includes significant portions of Midwood, Brooklyn, however, that was previously within the 9th.

In the 1980s, the district was based in Astoria and surrounding neighborhoods in Queens. This iteration of the district gained national attention in 1984, when 9th District Rep. Geraldine Ferraro became the vice presidential candidate of the Democratic Party.

Recent results in presidential elections

Year Office Results
1992 President Clinton 59 – 32%
1996 President Clinton 66 – 27%
2000 President Gore 67 – 30%
2004 President Kerry 56 – 44%
2008 President Obama 84 – 15%
2012 President Obama 85 – 14%
2016 President Clinton 84 – 14%
2020 President Biden 81 – 17%

Components: past and present

The Ninth District from 1993 to 2003
The Ninth District from 1993 to 2003

The 9th was historically a Queens district.[citation needed] Part of the old 9th became the 7th District in the 1992 redistricting when the present 9th absorbed much of the old 10th District based in Brooklyn.[citation needed]

List of members representing the district

Member Party Years Cong
ress
Electoral history
District created March 4, 1793
James Gordon Pro-Administration March 4, 1793 –
March 3, 1795
3rd Redistricted from the 6th district and re-elected in 1793.
Retired.
JohnWilliamsSalemNewYork.jpg

John Williams
Democratic-Republican[6] March 4, 1795 –
March 3, 1797
4th
5th
Elected in 1794.
Re-elected in 1796.
Redistricted to the 7th district and lost re-election.
Federalist[7][8] March 4, 1797 –
March 3, 1799
Brooklyn Museum - Jonas Platt - Samuel Finley Breese Morse - overall.jpg

Jonas Platt
Federalist March 4, 1799 –
March 3, 1801
6th Elected in 1798.
Retired.
Benjamin Walker Federalist March 4, 1801 –
March 3, 1803
7th Elected in 1800.
Retired.
Kiliaen K Van Rensselaer Semirestored.png

Killian K. Van Rensselaer
Federalist March 4, 1803 –
March 3, 1809
8th
9th
10th
Redistricted from the 8th district and re-elected in 1802.
Re-elected in 1804.
Re-elected in 1806.
Redistricted to the 7th district.
Thomas Sammons Federalist[9] March 4, 1809 –
March 3, 1811
11th
12th
Elected in 1808.
Re-elected in 1810.
Retired.
Democratic-Republican[10] March 4, 1811 –
March 3, 1813
John Lovett Federalist March 4, 1813 –
March 3, 1817
13th
14th
Elected in 1812.
Re-elected in 1814.
Retired.
Rensselaer Westerlo Federalist March 4, 1817 –
March 3, 1819
15th Elected in 1816.
Retired.
Solomon Van Rensselaer.jpg

Solomon Van Rensselaer
Federalist March 4, 1819 –
January 14, 1822
16th
17th
Elected in 1818.
Re-elected in 1821.
Resigned to become postmaster of Albany.
Vacant January 14, 1822 –
March 12, 1822
17th
StephenVanRensselaerIIIPortrait.jpg

Stephen Van Rensselaer
Federalist March 12, 1822 –
March 3, 1823
Elected to finish his cousin's term.
Redistricted to the 10th district.
James L. Hogeboom Crawford
Republican
March 4, 1823 –
March 3, 1825
18th Elected in 1822.
Retired.
William McManus Anti-Jacksonian March 4, 1825 –
March 3, 1827
19th Elected in 1824.
Lost re-election.
John Dean Dickinson.jpg

John D. Dickinson
Anti-Jacksonian March 4, 1827 –
March 3, 1831
20th
21st
Elected in 1826.
Re-elected in 1828.
Lost re-election.
Job Pierson Jacksonian March 4, 1831 –
March 3, 1835
22nd
23rd
Elected in 1830.
Re-elected in 1832.
Lost re-election.
Hiram P. Hunt Anti-Jacksonian March 4, 1835 –
March 3, 1837
24th Elected in 1834.
Lost re-election.
Henry Vail Democratic March 4, 1837 –
March 3, 1839
25th Elected in 1836.
Lost re-election.
Hiram P. Hunt Whig March 4, 1839 –
March 3, 1843
26th
27th
Elected in 1838.
Re-elected in 1840.
Lost re-election.
James G. Clinton Democratic March 4, 1843 –
March 3, 1845
28th Redistricted from the 6th district and re-elected in 1842.
Retired.
Archibald C. Niven Democratic March 4, 1845 –
March 3, 1847
29th Elected in 1844.
Retired.
Daniel B. St. John Whig March 4, 1847 –
March 3, 1849
30th Elected in 1846.
Retired.
Thomas McKissock Whig March 4, 1849 –
March 3, 1851
31st Elected in 1848.
Lost re-election.
William Murray 1803-75.jpg

William Murray
Democratic March 4, 1851 –
March 3, 1853
32nd Elected in 1850.
Redistricted to the 10th district.
Jared V. Peck.jpg

Jared V. Peck
Democratic March 4, 1853 –
March 3, 1855
33rd Elected in 1852.
Retired.
Bayard Clarke Opposition March 4, 1855 –
March 3, 1857
34th Elected in 1854.
Declined renomination as a Republican.
John Bussing Haskin.jpg

John B. Haskin
Democratic March 4, 1857 –
March 3, 1859
35th
36th
Elected in 1856.
Re-elected in 1858.
Retired.
Anti-Lecompton
Democratic
March 4, 1859 –
March 3, 1861
Edward haight.jpg

Edward Haight
Democratic March 4, 1861 –
March 3, 1863
37th Elected in 1860.
Lost re-election.
Rep. Anson Herrick.jpg

Anson Herrick
Democratic March 4, 1863 –
March 3, 1865
38th Elected in 1862.
Lost re-election.
William A. Darling.jpg

William A. Darling
Republican March 4, 1865 –
March 3, 1867
39th Elected in 1864.
Lost re-election.
Fernando Wood - Brady-Handy.jpg

Fernando Wood
Democratic March 4, 1867 –
March 3, 1873
40th
41st
42nd
Elected in 1866.
Re-elected in 1868.
Re-elected in 1870.
Redistricted to the 10th district.
David B. Mellish Republican March 4, 1873 –
May 23, 1874
43rd Elected in 1872.
Died.
Vacant May 23, 1874 –
December 7, 1874
Richard Schell 2.jpg

Richard Schell
Democratic December 7, 1874 –
March 3, 1875
Elected to finish Mellish's term.
Retired.
Fernando Wood - Brady-Handy.jpg

Fernando Wood
Democratic March 4, 1875 –
February 14, 1881
44th
45th
46th
Redistricted from the 10th district and re-elected in 1874.
Re-elected in 1876.
Re-elected in 1878.
Re-elected in 1880.
Died.
Vacant February 14, 1881 –
December 5, 1881
46th
47th
John Hardy Democratic December 5, 1881 –
March 3, 1885
47th
48th
Elected to finish Wood's term.
Re-elected in 1882.
Lost renomination.
JosephPulitzerPinceNeznpsgov.jpg

Joseph Pulitzer
Democratic March 4, 1885 –
April 10, 1886
49th Elected in 1884.
Resigned.
Vacant April 10, 1886 –
November 2, 1886
SSCox.jpg

Samuel S. Cox
Democratic November 2, 1886 –
September 10, 1889
49th
50th
51st
Elected to finish Pulitzer's term.
Re-elected in 1886.
Re-elected in 1888.
Died.
Vacant September 10, 1889 –
November 5, 1889
51st
Amos Jay Cummings.jpg

Amos J. Cummings
Democratic November 5, 1889 –
March 3, 1893
51st
52nd
Elected to finish Cox's term.
Re-elected in 1890.
Redistricted to the 11th district.
Timothy J. Campbell.jpg

Timothy J. Campbell
Democratic March 4, 1893 –
March 3, 1895
53rd Redistricted from the 8th district and re-elected in 1892.
[data unknown/missing]
Henry Clay Miner.jpg

Henry C. Miner
Democratic March 4, 1895 –
March 3, 1897
54th Elected in 1894.
Retired.
Thomas J. Bradley.jpg

Thomas J. Bradley
Democratic March 4, 1897 –
March 3, 1901
55th
56th
Elected in 1896.
Re-elected in 1898.
Retired.
Henry M Goldfogle.jpg

Henry M. Goldfogle
Democratic March 4, 1901 –
March 3, 1913
57th
58th
59th
60th
61st
62nd
Elected in 1900.
Re-elected in 1902.
Re-elected in 1904.
Re-elected in 1906.
Re-elected in 1908.
Re-elected in 1910.
Redistricted to the 12th district.
James H OBrien.jpg

James H. O'Brien
Democratic March 4, 1913 –
March 3, 1915
63rd Elected in 1912.
Lost re-election.
Oscar W. Swift (New York Congressman).jpg

Oscar W. Swift
Republican March 4, 1915 –
March 3, 1919
64th
65th
Elected in 1914.
Re-elected in 1916.
Lost re-election.
David J. O'Connell.jpg

David J. O'Connell
Democratic March 4, 1919 –
March 3, 1921
66th Elected in 1918.
Lost re-election.
Andrew Nicholas Petersen.jpg

Andrew Petersen
Republican March 4, 1921 –
March 3, 1923
67th Elected in 1920.
Lost re-election.
David J. O'Connell.jpg

David J. O'Connell
Democratic March 4, 1923 –
December 29, 1930
68th
69th
70th
71st
Elected in 1922.
Re-elected in 1924.
Re-elected in 1926.
Re-elected in 1928.
Re-elected in 1930.
Died.
Vacant December 29, 1930 –
February 17, 1931
71st
Stephen Andrew Rudd.jpg

Stephen A. Rudd
Democratic February 17, 1931 –
March 31, 1936
71st
72nd
73rd
74th
Elected to finish O'Connell's term.
Re-elected in 1932.
Re-elected in 1934.
Died.
Vacant March 31, 1936 –
January 3, 1937
74th
Eugene J. Keogh.jpg

Eugene J. Keogh
Democratic January 3, 1937 –
January 3, 1963
75th
76th
77th
78th
79th
80th
81st
82nd
83rd
84th
85th
86th
87th
Elected in 1936.
Re-elected in 1938.
Re-elected in 1940.
Re-elected in 1942.
Re-elected in 1944.
Re-elected in 1946.
Re-elected in 1948.
Re-elected in 1950.
Re-elected in 1952.
Re-elected in 1954.
Re-elected in 1956.
Re-elected in 1958.
Re-elected in 1960.
Redistricted to the 11th district.
James J. Delaney.jpg

James J. Delaney
Democratic January 3, 1963 –
December 31, 1978
88th
89th
90th
91st
92nd
93rd
94th
95th
Redistricted from the 7th district and re-elected in 1962.
Re-elected in 1964.
Re-elected in 1966.
Re-elected in 1968.
Re-elected in 1970.
Re-elected in 1972.
Re-elected in 1974.
Re-elected in 1976.
Resigned.
Vacant January 1, 1979 –
January 3, 1979
95th
GeraldineFerraro.jpg

Geraldine Ferraro
Democratic January 3, 1979 –
January 3, 1985
96th
97th
98th
Elected in 1978.
Re-elected in 1980.
Re-elected in 1982.
Retired to run for U.S. Vice President.
ThomasManton.jpg

Thomas J. Manton
Democratic January 3, 1985 –
January 3, 1993
99th
100th
101st
102nd
Elected in 1984.
Re-elected in 1986.
Re-elected in 1988.
Re-elected in 1990.
Redistricted to the 7th district.
Schumer-1987-.jpg

Chuck Schumer
Democratic January 3, 1993 –
January 3, 1999
103rd
104th
105th
Redistricted from the 10th district and re-elected in 1992.
Re-elected in 1994.
Re-elected in 1996.
Retired to run for U.S. senator.
Anthony Weiner, official portrait, 112th Congress.jpg

Anthony Weiner
Democratic January 3, 1999 –
June 21, 2011
106th
107th
108th
109th
110th
111th
112th
Elected in 1998.
Re-elected in 2000.
Re-elected in 2002.
Re-elected in 2004.
Re-elected in 2006.
Re-elected in 2008.
Re-elected in 2010.
Resigned.[11]
Vacant June 21, 2011 –
September 13, 2011
112th
Bob Turner, official portrait, 112th Congress.jpg

Robert Turner
Republican September 13, 2011 –
January 3, 2013
Elected to finish Weiner's term.
Redistricted to the 5th district but retired to run for U.S. senator.
Yvette Clarke official photo.jpg

Yvette Clarke
Democratic January 3, 2013 –
present
113th
114th
115th
116th
117th
Redistricted from the 11th district and re-elected in 2012.
Re-elected in 2014.
Re-elected in 2016.
Re-elected in 2018.
Re-elected in 2020.

Recent election results

In New York elections, there are minor parties. Certain parties will invariably endorse either the Republican or Democratic candidate for every office; hence, the state electoral results contain both the party votes, and the final candidate votes (Listed as "Recap").

US House election, 1870: New York District 9[12]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Fernando Wood (incumbent) 15,620 64.8
Young Democrat and Republican William S. Hillyer 4,789 19.8
Republican Morris Ellinger 3,707 15.4
Majority 10,831 45.0
Turnout 24,116 100
US House election, 1984: New York District 9
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Thomas J. Manton 71,420 52.8
Republican Serphin R. Maltese 63,910 47.2
Majority 7,510 5.6
Turnout 135,330 100
US House election, 1996: New York District 9
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Charles E. Schumer (incumbent) 107,107 74.8
Republican Robert J. Verga 30,488 21.3
Conservative Michael Mossa 5,618 3.9
Majority 76,619 53.5
Turnout 143,213 100
US House election, 1998: New York District 9
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Anthony D. Weiner 69,439 66.4 -8.4
Republican Louis Telano 24,486 23.4 +2.1
Liberal Melinda Katz 5,698 5.5 +5.5
Conservative Arthur J. Smith 4,899 4.7 +0.8
Majority 44,953 43.0 -10.5
Turnout 104,522 100 -27.0
US House election, 2000: New York District 9
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Anthony D. Weiner (incumbent) 98,983 68.4 +2.0
Republican Noach Dear 45,649 31.6 +8.2
Majority 53,334 36.9 -6.1
Turnout 144,632 100 +38.4
US House election, 2002: New York District 9
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Anthony D. Weiner (incumbent) 60,737 65.7 -2.7
Republican Alfred F. Donohue 31,698 34.3 +2.7
Majority 29,039 31.4 -5.5
Turnout 92,435 100 -36.1
US House election, 2004: New York District 9
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Anthony D. Weiner (incumbent) 113,025 71.3 +5.6
Republican Gerard J. Cronin 45,451 28.7 -5.6
Majority 67,574 42.6 +11.2
Turnout 158,476 100 +71.4
US House election, 2006: New York District 9
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Anthony D. Weiner (incumbent) 71,762 100 +28.7
Majority 71,762 100 +57.4
Turnout 71,762 100 -54.7
US House election, 2008: New York District 9
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Anthony D. Weiner (incumbent) 112,205 93.1 -6.9
Conservative Alfred F. Donohue 8,378 6.9 +6.9
Majority 103,827 86.2 -13.8
Turnout 120,583 100 +68.0
US House election, 2010: New York District 9
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Anthony D. Weiner (incumbent) 67,011 60.8 -32.3
Republican Bob Turner 43,129 39.2 +39.2
Majority 23,882 21.6 -64.6
Turnout 110,140 100 -8.7
Democratic hold
US House special election, 2011: New York District 9
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bob Turner 37,342 51.72
Democratic David Weprin 33,656 46.62
Socialist Workers Chris Hoeppner 143 0.2
Write-In Votes Multiple (49 Names) 1,056 1.46
Total votes 72,197 100
Republican gain from Democratic
US House election, 2018: New York District 9
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Yvette D. Clarke (incumbent) 181,455 89.3
Republican Lutchi Gayot 20,901 10.3
Reform Joel Anabilah-Azumah 779 0.4
Majority
Turnout 203,135 100.0
US House election, 2020: New York District 9
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Yvette Clarke 195,758 70.7
Working Families Yvette Clarke 34,463 12.4
Total Yvette Clarke (incumbent) 230,221 83.1
Republican Constantin Jean-Pierre 40,110 14.5
Conservative Constantin Jean-Pierre 3,840 1.4
Total Constantin Jean-Pierre 43,950 15.9
Libertarian Gary Popkin 1,644 0.6
SAM Joel Azumah 1,052 0.4
Total votes 276,867 100.0
Democratic hold

Historical district boundaries

2003 – 2013
2003 – 2013

See also

Notes

  1. ^ "New York congressional districts by urban and rural population and land area". United States Census Bureau. June 8, 2017. Archived from the original on November 21, 2019. Retrieved November 21, 2019.
  2. ^ "My Congressional District".
  3. ^ "Introducing the 2021 Cook Political Report Partisan Voter Index". The Cook Political Report. April 15, 2021. Retrieved April 15, 2021.
  4. ^ Feature Archived December 23, 2011, at the Wayback Machine. Queens Tribune (September 15, 2011). Retrieved on 2013-08-16.
  5. ^ "Pro-Israel Republican Bob Turner wins Weiner's NY seat - World News - Jerusalem Post".
  6. ^ "A New Nation Votes". elections.lib.tufts.edu. Retrieved June 12, 2020.
  7. ^ The History of Political Parties in the State of New-York, from the Ratification of the Federal Constitution to 1840 by Jabez D. Hammond (4th ed., Vol. 1, H. & E. Phinney, Cooperstown, 1846), on page 115: "…Gen. John Williams who had changed from a zealous democrat to a most heated federalist."
  8. ^ "A New Nation Votes". elections.lib.tufts.edu. Retrieved June 12, 2020.
  9. ^ "A New Nation Votes". elections.lib.tufts.edu. Retrieved June 12, 2020.
  10. ^ "A New Nation Votes". elections.lib.tufts.edu. Retrieved June 12, 2020.
  11. ^ Mali, Meghashyam (June 20, 2011). "Weiner submits his letter of resignation". TheHill. Retrieved June 12, 2020.
  12. ^ November Election, 1870. Complete Statement of the Official Canvass, in Detail of the Election Held November 8, 1870, Giving the Vote of Each Election District, with Proceedings of County And State... Volume II. County of New York. 1871. p. 2030. Retrieved March 26, 2009. |volume= has extra text (help)CS1 maint: others (link)

References

This page was last edited on 28 April 2021, at 23:47
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