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New York's 6th congressional district

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

New York's 6th congressional district
Interactive map of district boundaries
Representative
  Grace Meng
DQueens
Distribution
  • 100% urban
  • 0% rural
Population (2022)752,577[1]
Median household
income
$73,861[2]
Ethnicity
Cook PVID+15[3]

New York's 6th congressional district is a congressional district for the United States House of Representatives in New York City, located entirely within Queens. It is represented by Democrat Grace Meng. A plurality of the district's population is Asian-American, and a majority of its population is non-white.

The district includes several racially and ethnically diverse Queens neighborhoods, including Auburndale, Bayside, East Elmhurst, Elmhurst, Flushing, Forest Hills, Glendale, Kew Gardens, Maspeth, Middle Village, Murray Hill, and Rego Park. Prior to the 2022 election, the district was redrawn to include sections of Jackson Heights and Astoria which were previously part of NY-14.

In 2018, Chinese Americans made up 21.9% of the 6th district's population, the highest of any district in New York, and its Asian American population of 39.4% was similarly the highest out of New York's congressional districts, and the only district in New York where Asians formed the largest ethnic group. The 6th district takes in the original Queens Chinatown in Flushing, the neighborhood with the highest concentration of Chinese people in New York, as well as the surrounding neighborhoods of Auburndale and Murray Hill, home to a large Chinese population.[4]

Recent statewide election results

Year Office Results
1992 President B. Clinton 75–18%
1996 President B. Clinton 85–11%
2000 President Gore 87–11%
2004 President Kerry 84–15%
2008 President Obama 63–36%
2012 President Obama 68–31%
2016 President H. Clinton 65–32%
2020 President Biden 61–37%

History

1789–1913:

Parts of Manhattan

1913–1945:

Parts of Brooklyn

1945–1973:

Parts of Queens

1973–1983:

Parts of Nassau, Queens

1983–present:

Parts of Queens

Various New York districts have been numbered "6" over the years, including areas in New York City and various parts of upstate New York. From 2003–2013, the district included most of Southeastern Queens including the neighborhoods of Cambria Heights, Edgemere, Far Rockaway, Hollis, Jamaica, Laurelton, Queens Village, Rosedale, Saint Albans, Springfield Gardens, and South Ozone Park, as well as John F. Kennedy International Airport. The district comprised mainly middle-class minority communities, but also included a part of Howard Beach known as Old Howard Beach.

List of members representing the district

The 6th District was located in northern Queens and adjacent Nassau county until 1982, covering the same territory now in the 5th District. This part of Queens had been in the 7th District prior to that reapportionment.

1789–1809: one seat

Cong
ress
Years Representative Party Electoral history
District established March 4, 1789
1st March 4, 1789 –
March 3, 1791

Jeremiah Van Rensselaer
(Rensselaerswyck)
Anti-
Administration
Elected in 1789.
Lost re-election.
2nd March 4, 1791 –
March 3, 1793
James Gordon
(Schenectady)
Pro-
Administration
Elected in 1790.
Redistricted to the 9th district.
3rd March 4, 1793 –
March 3, 1795
Ezekiel Gilbert
(Hudson)
Pro-
Administration
Elected in 1793.
Re-elected in 1794.
Retired.
4th March 4, 1795 –
March 3, 1797
Federalist
5th March 4, 1797 –
March 3, 1799

Hezekiah L. Hosmer
(Hudson)
Federalist Re-elected in 1796.
Retired.
6th
7th
March 4, 1799 –
July 25, 1801
John Bird
(Troy)
Federalist Elected in 1798.
Re-elected in 1800.
Resigned.
7th July 25, 1801 –
October 6, 1801
Vacant
October 6, 1801 –
January 17, 1803

John Peter Van Ness
(Ghent)
Democratic-
Republican
Elected to finish Bird's term.
Seat declared forfeited from appointment as major of militia in the District of Columbia.
January 17, 1803 –
March 3, 1803
Vacant
8th March 4, 1803 –
April 26, 1803
Isaac Bloom
(Clinton)
Democratic-
Republican
Elected in 1802.
Died.
April 26, 1803 –
October 17, 1803
Vacant
8th
9th
10th
October 17, 1803 –
March 3, 1809
Daniel C. Verplanck
(Fishkill)
Democratic-
Republican
Elected to finish Bloom's term.
Re-elected in 1804.
Re-elected in 1806.
Retired.

1809–1813: two seats

From 1809 to 1813, two seats were elected at-large on a general ticket.

Cong
ress
Years Seat A   Seat B
Representative Party Electoral history Representative Party Electoral history
11th March 4, 1809 –
March 3, 1811

Herman Knickerbocker
(Schaghticoke)
Federalist Elected in 1808.
Retired.
Robert Le Roy Livingston
(Hudson)
Federalist Elected in 1808.
Resigned.
12th March 4, 1811 –
May 6, 1812
Asa Fitch
(Salem)
Federalist Elected in 1810.
Retired.
May 6, 1812 –
January 29, 1813
Vacant
January 29, 1813 –
March 3, 1813
Thomas P. Grosvenor
(Hudson)
Federalist Elected to finish Livingston's term.
Redistricted to the 5th district.

1813–present: one seat

Member Party Years Cong
ress
Electoral history Location

Jonathan Fisk
(Newburgh)
Democratic-
Republican
March 4, 1813 –
March 21, 1815
13th
14th
Elected in 1812.
Re-elected in 1814.
Resigned to become U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York.
1813–1823
Orange County
Vacant March 21, 1815 –
December 4, 1815
14th

James W. Wilkin
(Goshen)
Democratic-
Republican
December 4, 1815 –
March 3, 1819
14th
15th
Elected April 1815 to finish Fisk's term and seated December 4, 1815.
Re-elected in 1816.
[data missing]
Walter Case
(Newbury)
Democratic-
Republican
March 4, 1819 –
March 3, 1821
16th Elected in 1818.
[data missing]
Vacant March 4, 1821 –
December 3, 1821
17th Selah Tuthill (DR) was elected late in April 1821 and died September 7, 1821. It is unclear if/when he received his credentials.
Charles Borland Jr.
(Wardsbridge)
Democratic-
Republican
December 3, 1821 –
March 3, 1823
Elected November 8, 1821 to finish Tuthill's term and seated December 3, 1821.
[data missing]
Hector Craig
(Chester)
Jacksonian
Democratic-
Republican
March 4, 1823 –
March 3, 1825
18th Elected in 1822.
Lost re-election.
1823–1833
Orange County
John Hallock Jr.
(Ridgebury)
Jacksonian March 4, 1825 –
March 3, 1829
19th
20th
Elected in 1824.
Re-elected in 1826.
Retired.
Hector Craig
(Craigville)
Jacksonian March 4, 1829 –
July 12, 1830
21st Elected in 1828.
Resigned.
Vacant July 12, 1830 –
December 6, 1830
Samuel W. Eager
(Montgomery)
Anti-Jacksonian December 6, 1830 –
March 3, 1831
Elected to finish Craig's term.
Retired.

Samuel J. Wilkin
(Goshen)
Anti-Jacksonian March 4, 1831 –
March 3, 1833
22nd Elected in 1830.
[data missing]

John W. Brown
(Newburgh)
Jacksonian March 4, 1833 –
March 3, 1837
23rd
24th
Elected in 1832.
Re-elected in 1834.
[data missing]
1833–1843
[data missing]
Nathaniel Jones
(Warwick)
Democratic March 4, 1837 –
March 3, 1841
25th
26th
Elected in 1836.
Re-elected in 1838.
[data missing]
James G. Clinton
(Newburgh)
Democratic March 4, 1841 –
March 3, 1843
27th Elected in 1840.
Redistricted to the 9th district.

Hamilton Fish
(New York)
Whig March 4, 1843 –
March 3, 1845
28th Elected in 1842.
Lost re-election.
1843–1853
[data missing]

William W. Campbell
(New York)
Know Nothing March 4, 1845 –
March 3, 1847
29th Elected in 1844.
Retired.
David S. Jackson
(New York)
Democratic March 4, 1847 –
April 19, 1848
30th Elected in 1846.
Declared vacant due to contested election.
Vacant April 19, 1848 –
December 4, 1848

Horace Greeley
(New York)
Whig December 4, 1848 –
March 3, 1849
Elected to finish Jackson's term.
Lost nomination to the full term.

James Brooks
(New York)
Whig March 4, 1849 –
March 3, 1853
31st
32nd
Elected in 1848.
Re-elected in 1850.
Lost re-election.

John Wheeler
(New York)
Democratic March 4, 1853 –
March 3, 1857
33rd
34th
Elected in 1852.
Re-elected in 1854.
Retired.
1853–1863
[data missing]

John Cochrane
(New York)
Democratic March 4, 1857 –
March 3, 1861
35th
36th
Elected in 1856.
Re-elected in 1858.
Lost re-election.

Frederick A. Conkling
(New York)
Republican March 4, 1861 –
March 3, 1863
37th Elected in 1860.
Lost re-election.

Elijah Ward
(New York)
Democratic March 4, 1863 –
March 3, 1865
38th Redistricted from the 7th district and re-elected in 1862.
Lost re-election.
1863–1873
[data missing]

Henry J. Raymond
(New York)
Republican March 4, 1865 –
March 3, 1867
39th Elected in 1864.
Lost renomination.

Thomas E. Stewart
(New York)
Conservative
Republican
March 4, 1867 –
March 3, 1869
40th Elected in 1866.
Retired.

Samuel S. Cox
(New York)
Democratic March 4, 1869 –
March 3, 1873
41st
42nd
Elected in 1868.
Re-elected in 1870.
Lost re-election.

James Brooks
(New York)
Democratic March 4, 1873 –
April 30, 1873
43rd Redistricted from the 8th district and re-elected in 1872.
Died.
1873–1883
[data missing]
Vacant April 30, 1873 –
November 4, 1873

Samuel S. Cox
(New York)
Democratic November 4, 1873 –
March 3, 1885
43rd
44th
45th
46th
47th
48th
Elected to finish Brooks's term.
Re-elected in 1874.
Re-elected in 1876.
Re-elected in 1878.
Re-elected in 1880.
Re-elected in 1882.
Redistricted to the 8th district.
1883–1893
[data missing]

Nicholas Muller
(New York)
Democratic March 4, 1885 –
March 3, 1887
49th Redistricted from the 5th district and re-elected in 1884.

Amos J. Cummings
(New York)
Democratic March 4, 1887 –
March 3, 1889
50th Redistricted from the 5th district and re-elected in 1886.

Frank T. Fitzgerald
(New York)
Democratic March 4, 1889 –
November 4, 1889
51st Elected in 1888.
Resigned to become register of New York County.
Vacant November 4, 1889 –
December 9, 1889

Charles H. Turner
(New York)
Democratic December 9, 1889 –
March 3, 1891
Elected to finish Fitzgerald's term.
[data missing]

John R. Fellows
(New York)
Democratic March 4, 1891 –
March 3, 1893
52nd Elected in 1890.
Redistricted to the 14th district.

Thomas F. Magner
(New York)
Democratic March 4, 1893 –
March 3, 1895
53rd Redistricted from the 5th district and re-elected in 1892. 1893–1903
[data missing]

James R. Howe
(Brooklyn)
Republican March 4, 1895 –
March 3, 1899
54th
55th
Elected in 1894.
Re-elected in 1896.
[data missing]

Mitchell May
(Brooklyn)
Democratic March 4, 1899 –
March 3, 1901
56th Elected in 1898.

George H. Lindsay
(Brooklyn)
Democratic March 4, 1901 –
March 3, 1903
57th Elected in 1900.
Redistricted to the 2nd district.

Robert Baker
(Brooklyn)
Democratic March 4, 1903 –
March 3, 1905
58th Elected in 1902. 1903–1913
[data missing]

William M. Calder
(Brooklyn)
Republican March 4, 1905 –
March 3, 1915
59th
60th
61st
62nd
63rd
Elected in 1904.
Re-elected in 1906.
Re-elected in 1908.
Re-elected in 1910.
Re-elected in 1912.
[data missing]
1913–1923
[data missing]

Frederick W. Rowe
(Brooklyn)
Republican March 4, 1915 –
March 3, 1921
64th
65th
66th
Elected in 1914.
Re-elected in 1916.
Re-elected in 1918.
[data missing]

Warren I. Lee
(Brooklyn)
Republican March 4, 1921 –
March 3, 1923
67th Elected in 1920.
Lost re-election.

Charles I. Stengle
(Brooklyn)
Democratic March 4, 1923 –
March 3, 1925
68th Elected in 1922.
Retired.
1923–1933
[data missing]

Andrew L. Somers
(Brooklyn)
Democratic March 4, 1925 –
January 3, 1945
69th
70th
71st
72nd
73rd
74th
75th
76th
77th
78th
Elected in 1924.
Re-elected in 1926.
Re-elected in 1928.
Re-elected in 1930.
Re-elected in 1932.
Re-elected in 1934.
Re-elected in 1936.
Re-elected in 1938.
Re-elected in 1940.
Re-elected in 1942.
Redistricted to the 10th district.
1933–1943
[data missing]
1943–1945
[data missing]

James J. Delaney
(Queens)
Democratic January 3, 1945 –
January 3, 1947
79th Elected in 1944.
Lost re-election.
1945–1973
Parts of Queens

Robert Nodar Jr.
(Maspeth)
Republican January 3, 1947 –
January 3, 1949
80th Elected in 1946.
Lost re-election.

James J. Delaney
(Queens)
Democratic January 3, 1949 –
January 3, 1953
81st
82nd
Elected in 1948.
Re-elected in 1950.
Redistricted to the 7th district.

Lester Holtzman
(Queens)
Democratic January 3, 1953 –
December 31, 1961
83rd
84th
85th
86th
87th
Elected in 1952.
Re-elected in 1954.
Re-elected in 1956.
Re-elected in 1958.
Re-elected in 1960.
Resigned.
Vacant January 1, 1962 –
February 19, 1962
87th

Benjamin S. Rosenthal
(Queens)
Democratic February 20, 1962 –
January 3, 1963
Elected to finish Holtzman's term.
Redistricted to the 8th district.

Seymour Halpern
(Queens)
Republican January 3, 1963 –
January 3, 1973
88th
89th
90th
91st
92nd
Redistricted from the 4th district and re-elected in 1962.
Re-elected in 1964.
Re-elected in 1966.
Re-elected in 1968.
Re-elected in 1970.

Lester L. Wolff
(Great Neck)
Democratic January 3, 1973 –
January 3, 1981
93rd
94th
95th
96th
Redistricted from the 3rd district and re-elected in 1972.
Re-elected in 1974.
Re-elected in 1976.
Re-elected in 1978.
Lost re-election.
1973–1983
Parts of Nassau County and Queens

John LeBoutillier
(Westbury)
Republican January 3, 1981 –
January 3, 1983
97th Elected in 1980.
Redistricted to the 3rd district and lost re-election.

Joseph P. Addabbo
(Queens)
Democratic January 3, 1983 –
April 10, 1986
98th
99th
Redistricted from the 7th district and re-elected in 1982.
Re-elected in 1984.
Died.
1983–1993
Parts of Queens
Vacant April 11, 1986 –
June 9, 1986
99th

Alton Waldon
(Queens)
Democratic June 10, 1986 –
January 3, 1987
Elected to finish Addabbo's term.
Lost re-nomination.

Floyd Flake
(Queens)
Democratic January 3, 1987 –
November 17, 1997
100th
101st
102nd
103rd
104th
105th
Elected in 1986.
Re-elected in 1988.
Re-elected in 1990.
Re-elected in 1992.
Re-elected in 1994.
Re-elected in 1996.
Resigned to return to work at his church.
1993–2003
[data missing]
Vacant November 17, 1997 –
February 6, 1998
105th

Gregory Meeks
(Queens)
Democratic February 6, 1998 –
January 3, 2013
105th
106th
107th
108th
109th
110th
111th
112th
Elected to finish Flake's term.
Re-elected in 1998.
Re-elected in 2000.
Re-elected in 2002.
Re-elected in 2004.
Re-elected in 2006.
Re-elected in 2008.
Re-elected in 2010.
Redistricted to the 5th district.
2003–2013
Parts of Queens

Grace Meng
(Queens)
Democratic January 3, 2013 –
present
113th
114th
115th
116th
117th
118th
Elected in 2012.
Re-elected in 2014.
Re-elected in 2016.
Re-elected in 2018.
Re-elected in 2020.
Re-elected in 2022.
2013–2023
Parts of Queens
2023–2025
Parts of Queens


Election results

Note that in New York State electoral politics there are numerous minor parties at various points on the political spectrum. Certain parties will invariably endorse either the Republican or Democratic candidate for every office, hence the state electoral results contain both the party votes, and the final candidate votes (Listed as "Recap").

US House election, 1996: New York District 6
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Floyd Flake (incumbent) 102,799 84.9
Republican Jorawar Misir 18,348 15.1
Majority 84,451 69.7
Turnout 121,147 100
Special Election 1998: New York District 6
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Gregory Meeks 14,224 56.5 −28.4
Conservative Alton Waldon 5,229 20.8 +20.8
21st Century Barbara M. Clark 3,305 13.1 +13.1
Republican Celestine Miller 2,209 8.8 −6.3
Right to Life Mary Cronin 206 0.8 +0.8
Majority 8,995 35.7 −34.0
Turnout 25,173 100 −79.2
US House election, 1998: New York District 6
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Gregory Meeks (incumbent) 76,122 100 +43.5
Majority 76,122 100 +64.3
Turnout 76,122 100 +202.4
US House election, 2000: New York District 6
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Gregory Meeks (incumbent) 120,818 100 0.0
Majority 120,818 100 0.0
Turnout 120,818 100 +58.7
US House election, 2002: New York District 6
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Gregory Meeks (incumbent) 72,799 96.5 −3.5
Independence Ray Clarke 2,632 3.5 +3.5
Majority 70,167 93.0 −7.0
Turnout 75,431 100 −37.6
US House election, 2004: New York District 6
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Gregory Meeks (incumbent) 129,688 100 +3.5
Majority 129,688 100 +7.0
Turnout 129,688 100 +71.9
US House election, 2006: New York District 6
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Gregory Meeks (incumbent) 69,405 100 0.0
Majority 69,405 100 0.0
Turnout 69,405 100 −46.5
US House election, 2008: New York District 6
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Gregory Meeks (incumbent) 141,180 100 0.0
Majority 141,180 100 0.0
Turnout 141,180 100 +103.4
US House election, 2010: New York District 6
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Gregory Meeks (incumbent) 85,096 87.8 −12.2
Republican Asher E. Taub 11,826 12.2 +12.2
Majority 73,270 75.6 −24.4
Turnout 96,922 100 −31.3
US House election, 2012: New York District 6
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Grace Meng 111,499 59.6
Republican Daniel Halloran 50,845 27.2
Green Evergreen Chou 1,913 1
N/A Blank/Void/Scattering 22,675 12.1
Turnout 186,932 100
US House election, 2014: New York District 6
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Grace Meng (incumbent) 55,368 71.6
N/A Blank/Void/Scattering 21,938 28.4
Turnout 77,306 100
US House election, 2016: New York District 6
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Grace Meng (incumbent) 136,506 72.1
Republican Danniel Maio 50,617 26.7
Haris Bhatti Party Haris Bhatti 2,123 1.1
Turnout 189,246 100


US House election, 2018: New York District 6
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Grace Meng (incumbent) 111,646 90.9
Green Tom Hillgardner 11,209 9.1
Turnout 122,855 100
US House election, 2020: New York District 6
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Grace Meng 144,149 61.7
Working Families Grace Meng 14,713 6.3
Total Grace Meng (incumbent) 158,862 68.0
Republican Tom Zmich 67,735 29.0
Conservative Tom Zmich 5,231 2.2
Save Our City Tom Zmich 1,109 0.5
Libertarian Tom Zmich 754 0.3
Total Tom Zmich 74,829 32.0
Total votes 233,691 100.0
Democratic hold

See also

References

  • Martis, Kenneth C. (1989). The Historical Atlas of Political Parties in the United States Congress. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company.
  • Martis, Kenneth C. (1982). The Historical Atlas of United States Congressional Districts. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company.
  • Congressional Biographical Directory of the United States 1774–present
  • 1996 House election data "
  • 1998 House election data "
  • 2000 House election data "
  • 2002 House election data "
  • 2004 House election data Clerk of the House of Representatives
Specific
  1. ^ "New York congressional districts by urban and rural population and land area". United States Census Bureau. June 8, 2017. Archived from the original on November 21, 2019. Retrieved November 21, 2019.
  2. ^ "Congressional District 6, NY - Profile data". Census Reporter. Retrieved October 31, 2022.
  3. ^ "2022 Cook PVI: District Map and List". Cook Political Report. Retrieved January 10, 2023.
  4. ^ "The Demographic Statistical Atlas of the United States - Statistical Atlas". statisticalatlas.com. Retrieved January 14, 2024.
This page was last edited on 24 March 2024, at 03:33
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