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New York's 10th congressional district

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

New York's 10th congressional district
New York US Congressional District 10 (since 2013).tif
New York's 10th congressional district since January 3, 2013
Representative
  Jerry Nadler
DManhattan
Distribution
  • 100% urban
  • 0% rural
Population (2019)732,732[1]
Median household
income
$103,331[2]
Ethnicity
Cook PVID+27[3]

New York's 10th congressional district is a congressional district for the United States House of Representatives, located from 2003 to 2013 in Brooklyn, New York City, and currently represented by Democrat Jerry Nadler. The district contains the southern portion of Morningside Heights, the Upper West Side of Manhattan, the west side of Midtown Manhattan, the west side of Lower Manhattan, including Greenwich Village, Tribeca, and the Financial District, and parts of Brooklyn, most notably Borough Park and parts of Bensonhurst.

With a size of 14.25 mi², the district is the second-smallest in the country, after New York's 13th congressional district.[4] Demographically, it includes neighborhoods in Manhattan and Brooklyn that are heavily Jewish. New York’s 10th district has the largest number (270,000) and the highest percentage of Jews (37.6%) of any congressional district.[5]

Redistricting

The 10th District was a Brooklyn-based seat until 1972, when that district became the 16th, and the 10th was reassigned to a district in northern Queens and the east Bronx. The 1980 redistricting restored the 10th District to Brooklyn (covering the same terrain). In the 1990 remap, much of the old 10th District was added to the new Queens-Brooklyn 9th District. The new 10th then absorbed much of the old 11th District, including its congressman.

Following the 2012 redistricting, the district shed most of its Brooklyn territory, and picked up parts of Manhattan that had been in the 8th district.

From 2003 to 2013, this congressional district was exclusively Brooklyn-based and majority African-American. It included Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn Heights, Brownsville, Canarsie, East New York, and Ocean Hill, as well as parts of Fort Greene, Prospect Heights, and Williamsburg.[6]

Recent election results from statewide races

Year Office Results
1992 President Clinton 83 - 13%
1996 President Clinton 90 - 6%
2000 President Gore 88 - 8%
2004 President Kerry 86 - 13%
2008 President Obama 76 - 23%
2012 President Obama 73 - 25%
2016 President Clinton 78 - 18%
2020 President Biden 76 - 22%

List of members representing the district

Member Party Years Cong
ress
Electoral history District location
District created March 4, 1793
Silas Talbot.jpg

Silas Talbot
Pro-Administration March 4, 1793 –
June 5, 1794
3rd Elected in 1793.
Resigned to join the U.S. Navy.
1793–1799
Western New York, with its eastern border being approximately the eastern borders of Jefferson (with St. Lawrence County), Lewis (with St. Lawrence County), Herkimer (its northern border), Hamilton (northern and eastern), Fulton, Montgomery, Schoharie, and Delaware Counties. With Delaware County, its southern border was also one of the district borders.
Vacant June 5, 1794 –
March 3, 1795
No special election called by Gov. Clinton for political reasons.
William Cooper by Gilbert Stuart.jpg

William Cooper
Federalist March 4, 1795 –
March 3, 1797
4th Elected in 1794.
Lost re-election.
James Cochran Federalist March 4, 1797 –
March 3, 1799
5th Elected in 1796.
Retired.
William Cooper by Gilbert Stuart.jpg

William Cooper
Federalist March 4, 1799 –
March 3, 1801
6th Elected in 1798.
Retired.
1799–1803
All New York west of and including Cayuga, Onondaga, Cortland, and Broome Counties. It also included portions of what is today Chenango and Otsego Counties.
Thomas Morris Federalist March 4, 1801 –
March 3, 1803
7th Elected in 1800.
Retired.
George Tibbits Federalist March 4, 1803 –
March 3, 1805
8th Elected in 1802.
Retired.
1803–1809
Rensselaer County
Josiah Masters Democratic-Republican March 4, 1805 –
March 3, 1809
9th
10th
Elected in 1804.
Re-elected in 1806.
[data unknown/missing]
John Nicholson Democratic-Republican March 4, 1809 –
March 3, 1811
11th Elected in 1808.
[data unknown/missing]
1809–1813
Jefferson, Lewis, Herkimer and St. Lawrence Counties.
Silas Stow Democratic-Republican March 4, 1811 –
March 3, 1813
12th Elected in 1810.
[data unknown/missing]
Hosea Moffitt Federalist March 4, 1813 –
March 3, 1817
13th
14th
Elected in 1812.
Re-elected in 1814.
[data unknown/missing]
1813–1823
Rensselaer County
John Paine Cushman.jpg

John P. Cushman
Federalist March 4, 1817 –
March 3, 1819
15th Re-elected in 1816.
[data unknown/missing]
John Dean Dickinson.jpg

John D. Dickinson
Federalist March 4, 1819 –
March 3, 1823
16th
17th
Elected in 1818.
Re-elected in 1821.
[data unknown/missing]
StephenVanRensselaerIIIPortrait.jpg

Stephen Van Rensselaer
Adams-Clay Federalist March 4, 1823 –
March 3, 1825
18th
19th
20th
Redistricted from the 9th district and re-elected in 1822.
Re-elected in 1824.
Re-elected in 1826.
Retired.
1823–1843
Albany County
Anti-Jacksonian March 4, 1825 –
March 3, 1829
ASpencer.jpg

Ambrose Spencer
Anti-Jacksonian March 4, 1829 –
March 3, 1831
21st Elected in 1828.
[data unknown/missing]
Gerrit Yates Lansing.jpg

Gerrit Y. Lansing
Jacksonian March 4, 1831 –
March 3, 1837
22nd
23rd
24th
Elected in 1830.
Re-elected in 1832.
Re-elected in 1834.
[data unknown/missing]
Albert Gallup Democratic March 4, 1837 –
March 3, 1839
25th Elected in 1836.
[data unknown/missing]
D. D. Barnard.jpg

Daniel D. Barnard
Whig March 4, 1839 –
March 3, 1843
26th
27th
Elected in 1838.
Re-elected in 1840.
Redistricted to the 13th district.
Jeremiah Russell.jpg

Jeremiah Russell
Democratic March 4, 1843 –
March 3, 1845
28th Elected in 1842.
[data unknown/missing]
1843–1853
Delaware and Ulster Counties.
Samuel Gordon (1802-1873).jpg

Samuel Gordon
Democratic March 4, 1845 –
March 3, 1847
29th Elected in 1844.
[data unknown/missing]
Eliakim Sherrill.jpg

Eliakim Sherrill
Whig March 4, 1847 –
March 3, 1849
30th Elected in 1846.
[data unknown/missing]
Herman D. Gould Whig March 4, 1849 –
March 3, 1851
31st Elected in 1848.
[data unknown/missing]
Marius Schoonmaker.jpg

Marius Schoonmaker
Whig March 4, 1851 –
March 3, 1853
32nd Elected in 1850.
[data unknown/missing]
William Murray 1803-75.jpg

William Murray
Independent
Democratic
March 4, 1853 –
March 3, 1855
33rd Redistricted from the 9th district and re-elected in 1852.
[data unknown/missing]
1853–1863
Sullivan and Orange Counties.
Ambrose S. Murray.jpg

Ambrose S. Murray
Opposition March 4, 1855 –
March 3, 1857
34th
35th
Elected in 1854.
Re-elected in 1856.
[data unknown/missing]
Republican March 4, 1857 –
March 3, 1859
VAN WYCK, Charles Henry.jpg

Charles Van Wyck
Republican March 4, 1859 –
March 3, 1863
36th
37th
Elected in 1858.
Re-elected in 1860.
[data unknown/missing]
Rep. William Radford, D., N.Y.jpg

William Radford
Democratic March 4, 1863 –
March 3, 1867
38th
39th
Elected in 1862.
Re-elected in 1864.
[data unknown/missing]
1863–1873
Westchester and Rockland Counties and The Bronx.
WilliamHRobertson.jpg

William H. Robertson
Republican March 4, 1867 –
March 3, 1869
40th Elected in 1866.
[data unknown/missing]
Clarkson Nott Potter - Brady-Handy.jpg

Clarkson Nott Potter
Democratic March 4, 1869 –
March 3, 1873
41st
42nd
Elected in 1868.
Re-elected in 1870.
Redistricted to the 11th district.
Fernando Wood - Brady-Handy.jpg

Fernando Wood
Democratic March 4, 1873 –
March 3, 1875
43rd Redistricted from the 9th district and re-elected in 1872.
Redistricted to the 9th district.
1873–1875
Northern Manhattan.
Abram Stevens Hewitt 1822-1903.jpg

Abram Stevens Hewitt
Democratic March 4, 1875 –
March 3, 1879
44th
45th
Elected in 1874.
Re-elected in 1876.
[data unknown/missing]
1875–1903
Various parts of mid-town and Lower Manhattan.
James OBrien U.S. Congressman - Brady-Handy.jpg

James O'Brien
Independent
Democratic
March 4, 1879 –
March 3, 1881
46th Elected in 1878.
[data unknown/missing]
Abram Stevens Hewitt 1822-1903.jpg

Abram Stevens Hewitt
Democratic March 4, 1881 –
December 30, 1886
47th
48th
49th
Elected in 1880.
Re-elected in 1882.
Re-elected in 1884.
Resigned on election as Mayor of New York City.
Vacant December 30, 1886 –
March 3, 1887
Francis Barreto Spinola.jpg

Francis B. Spinola
Democratic March 4, 1887 –
April 14, 1891
50th
51st
52nd
Elected in 1886.
Re-elected in 1888.
Re-elected in 1890.
Died.
Vacant April 14, 1891 –
November 3, 1891
William Bourke Cockran (ca. 1903).jpg

William Bourke Cockran
Democratic November 3, 1891 –
March 3, 1893
52nd Elected to finish Spinola's term.
Redistricted to the 12th district.
Daniel Edgar Sickles.jpg

Daniel E. Sickles
Democratic March 4, 1893 –
March 3, 1895
53rd Elected in 1892.
Lost re-election.
Vacant March 4, 1895 –
November 5, 1895
Representative-elect Andrew J. Campbell died before term began
Amos Jay Cummings.jpg

Amos J. Cummings
Democratic November 5, 1895 –
May 2, 1902
54th
55th
56th
57th
Elected to finish Campbell's term.
Re-elected in 1896.
Re-elected in 1898.
Re-elected in 1900.
Died.
Vacant May 2, 1902 –
November 4, 1902
Edward Swann, New York Congressman.jpg

Edward Swann
Democratic November 4, 1902 –
March 3, 1903
57th Elected to finish Cummings's term.
[data unknown/missing]
William Sulzer NY.jpg

William Sulzer
Democratic March 4, 1903 –
December 31, 1912
58th
59th
60th
61st
62nd
Redistricted from the 11th district and re-elected in 1902.
Re-elected in 1904.
Re-elected in 1906.
Re-elected in 1908.
Re-elected in 1910.
Resigned to become Governor of New York.
Vacant January 1, 1913 –
March 3, 1913
MetzHermanA-1904.jpg

Herman A. Metz
Democratic March 4, 1913 –
March 3, 1915
63rd Elected in 1912.
[data unknown/missing]
1913–1933
Parts of Brooklyn
Reuben L. Haskell.jpg

Reuben L. Haskell
Republican March 4, 1915 –
December 31, 1919
64th
65th
66th
Elected in 1914.
Re-elected in 1916.
Re-elected in 1918.
Resigned.
Vacant December 31, 1919 –
November 2, 1920
Lester D. Volk.jpg

Lester D. Volk
Republican November 2, 1920 –
March 3, 1923
66th
67th
Elected to finish Haskell's term.
Re-elected in 1920.
Lost re-election.
Emanuel Celler NYWTS.jpg

Emanuel Celler
Democratic March 4, 1923 –
January 3, 1945
68th
69th
70th
71st
72nd
73rd
74th
75th
76th
77th
78th
Elected in 1922.
Re-elected in 1924.
Re-elected in 1926.
Re-elected in 1928.
Re-elected in 1930.
Re-elected in 1932.
Re-elected in 1934.
Re-elected in 1936.
Re-elected in 1938.
Re-elected in 1940.
Re-elected in 1942.
Redistricted to the 15th district.
Andrew L. Somers.jpg

Andrew L. Somers
Democratic January 3, 1945 –
April 6, 1949
79th
80th
81st
Redistricted from the 6th district and re-elected in 1944.
Re-elected in 1946.
Re-elected in 1948.
Died.
Vacant April 7, 1949 –
November 7, 1949
Edna Flannery Kelly.jpg

Edna F. Kelly
Democratic November 8, 1949 –
January 3, 1963
81st
82nd
83rd
84th
85th
86th
87th
Elected to finish Somers's term
Re-elected in 1950.
Re-elected in 1952.
Re-elected in 1954.
Re-elected in 1956.
Re-elected in 1958.
Re-elected in 1960.
Redistricted to the 12th district.
1949–1963
[data unknown/missing]
Emanuel Celler NYWTS.jpg

Emanuel Celler
Democratic January 3, 1963 –
January 3, 1971
88th
89th
90th
91st
92nd
Redistricted from the 11th district and re-elected in 1962.
Re-elected in 1964.
Re-elected in 1966.
Re-elected in 1968.
Re-elected in 1970.
Redistricted to the 16th district and lost renomination.
1963–1971
Parts of Brooklyn, Queens
January 3, 1971 –
January 3, 1973
1971–1973
Parts of Brooklyn
Mario Biaggi.jpg

Mario Biaggi
Democratic January 3, 1973 –
January 3, 1983
93rd
94th
95th
96th
97th
Redistricted from the 24th district and re-elected in 1972.
Re-elected in 1974.
Re-elected in 1976.
Re-elected in 1978.
Re-elected in 1980.
Redistricted to the 19th district.
1973–1983
Parts of Bronx, Queens
Schumer-1987-.jpg

Chuck Schumer
Democratic January 3, 1983 –
January 3, 1993
98th
99th
100th
101st
102nd
Redistricted from the 16th district and re-elected in 1982.
Re-elected in 1984.
Re-elected in 1986.
Re-elected in 1988.
Re-elected in 1990.
Redistricted to the 9th district.
1983–2003
Parts of Brooklyn
Edolphus Towns portrait.jpg

Ed Towns
Democratic January 3, 1993 –
January 3, 2013
103rd
104th
105th
106th
107th
108th
109th
110th
111th
112th
Redistricted from the 11th district and re-elected in 1992.
Re-elected in 1994.
Re-elected in 1996.
Re-elected in 1998.
Re-elected in 2000.
Re-elected in 2002.
Re-elected in 2004.
Re-elected in 2006.
Re-elected in 2008.
Re-elected in 2010.
Retired.
Jerry Nadler 116th Congress official portrait (cropped).jpg

Jerry Nadler
Democratic January 3, 2013 –
present
113th
114th
115th
116th
117th
Redistricted from the 8th district and re-elected in 2012.
Re-elected in 2014.
Re-elected in 2016.
Re-elected in 2018.
Re-elected in 2020.
2013–present
Parts of Manhattan and Brooklyn

Recent election results

In New York State, there are numerous minor parties at various points on the political spectrum. Certain parties will invariably endorse either the Republican or Democratic candidate for every office, hence the state electoral results contain both the party votes, and the final candidate votes (Listed as "Recap").

U.S. House election, 1870:
New York's 10th congressional district[7]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Clarkson Nott Potter (incumbent) 14,249 57.1
Republican James Westervelt 10,685 42.9
Majority 3,564 14.2
Turnout 24,934 100
U.S. House election, 1996:
New York's 10th congressional district
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Edolphus Towns (incumbent) 99,889 91.3
Republican Amelia Smith-Parker 8,660 7.9
Right to Life Julian M. Hill Jr. 893 0.8
Majority 91,229 83.4
Turnout 109,442 100
U.S. House election, 1998:
New York's 10th congressional district
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Edolphus Towns (incumbent) 83,528 92.3 Increase 1.0
Republican Ernestine M. Brown 5,577 6.2 Decrease 1.7
Conservative Ernest Johnson 1,396 1.5 Increase 1.5
Majority 77,951 86.1 Increase 2.7
Turnout 90,501 100 Decrease 17.3
U.S. House election, 2000:
New York's 10th congressional district
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Edolphus Towns (incumbent) 120,700 90.2 Decrease 2.1
Republican Ernestine M. Brown 6,852 5.1 Decrease 1.1
Working Families Barry Ford 5,530 4.1 Increase 4.1
Conservative Ernest Johnson 802 0.6 Decrease 0.9
Majority 113,848 85.0 Decrease 1.1
Turnout 133,884 100 Increase 47.9
U.S. House election, 2002:
New York's 10th congressional district
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Edolphus Towns (incumbent) 73,859 97.8 Increase 7.6
Conservative Herbert F. Rayn 1,639 2.2 Increase 1.6
Majority 72,220 95.7 Increase 10.7
Turnout 75,498 100 Decrease 43.6
U.S. House election, 2004:
New York's 10th congressional district
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Edolphus Towns (incumbent) 136,113 91.5 Decrease 6.3
Republican Harvey R. Clarke 11,099 7.5 Increase 7.5
Conservative Mariana Blume 1,554 1.0 Decrease 1.2
Majority 125,014 84.0 Decrease 11.7
Turnout 148,766 100 Increase 97.0
U.S. House election, 2006:
New York's 10th congressional district
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Edolphus Towns (incumbent) 72,171 92.2 Increase 0.7
Republican Jonathan H. Anderson 4,666 6.0 Decrease 1.5
Conservative Ernest Johnson 1,470 1.9 Increase 0.9
Majority 67,505 86.2 Increase 2.2
Turnout 78,307 100 Decrease 47.4
U.S. House election, 2008:
New York's 10th congressional district
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Edolphus Towns (incumbent) 72,171 92.2 Increase 0.7
Republican Jonathan H. Anderson 4,666 6.0 Decrease 1.5
Conservative Ernest Johnson 1,470 1.9 Increase 0.9
Majority 67,505 86.2 Increase 2.2
Turnout 78,307 100 Decrease 47.4
U.S. House election, 2014:
New York's 10th congressional district
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Jerry Nadler (incumbent) 89,080 87.6 n/a
Conservative Ross Brady 12,042 11.8 n/a
Flourish Every Person Michael Dilger 554 0.6 n/a
Majority 89,080 75.8 n/a
Turnout 113,226 20.1 n/a
Democratic Primary, 2016: New York District 10[8]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Jerry Nadler (incumbent) 25,527 89.6 n/a
Democratic Oliver Rosenberg 2,949 10.4 n/a
Majority 22,578 79.3 n/a
Turnout 28,476 5.1 n/a
U.S. House election, 2016:
New York's 10th congressional district[9]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Jerry Nadler (incumbent) 170,286 77.5 n/a
Republican Philip Rosenthal 49,530 22.5 n/a
Majority 120,756 55 n/a
Turnout 219,816 39.4 n/a
U.S. House election, 2018:
New York's 10th congressional district[9]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Jerry Nadler (incumbent) 173,095 82.1 n/a
Republican Naomi Levin 33,692 16.0 n/a
Majority 173,095 82 n/a
Turnout 210,714 100 n/a
U.S. House election, 2020:
New York's 10th congressional district[9]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jerry Nadler 181,215 65.5
Working Families Jerry Nadler 25,095 9.1
Total Jerry Nadler (incumbent) 206,310 74.6
Republican Cathy Bernstein 61,045 22.1
Conservative Cathy Bernstein 5,844 2.1
Total Cathy Bernstein 66,889 24.2
Libertarian Michael Madrid 3,370 1.2
Total votes 276,569 100.0
Democratic hold

Historical district boundaries

2003 - 2013
2003 - 2013

See also

Notes

  1. ^ "New York congressional districts by urban and rural population and land area". United States Census Bureau. June 8, 2017. Archived from the original on November 21, 2019. Retrieved November 21, 2019.
  2. ^ "My Congressional District". US Census Bureau. Retrieved December 10, 2019.
  3. ^ "Introducing the 2021 Cook Political Report Partisan Voter Index". The Cook Political Report. April 15, 2021. Retrieved April 15, 2021.
  4. ^ "New York congressional districts by urban and rural population and land area". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 11, 2014.
  5. ^ "2014 Jewish Maps of the United States by Congressional District (Comenetz)".
  6. ^ "The Art of the Gerrymander - 11 of 11". POLITICO Magazine. Retrieved June 28, 2019.
  7. ^ November Election, 1870. Complete Statement of the Official Canvass, in Detail of the Election Held November 8, 1870, Giving the Vote of Each Election District, with Proceedings of County And State…. Volume II. County of New York. 1871. p. 2031. Retrieved March 13, 2009. |volume= has extra text (help)CS1 maint: others (link)
  8. ^ "New York House Races Results". Politico. Retrieved July 13, 2016.
  9. ^ a b c "New York U.S. House 10th District Results: Jerrold Nadler Wins - Election Results 2016". The New York Times. Retrieved February 24, 2017.

References

This page was last edited on 9 May 2021, at 08:11
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