To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

New Kent County, Virginia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

New Kent County
County courthouse
County courthouse
Official seal of New Kent County
Map of Virginia highlighting New Kent County
Location within the U.S. state of Virginia
Map of the United States highlighting Virginia
Virginia's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 37°31′N 77°00′W / 37.51°N 77°W / 37.51; -77
Country United States
State Virginia
Founded1654
Named forKent, England
SeatNew Kent
Area
 • Total222 sq mi (570 km2)
 • Land210 sq mi (500 km2)
 • Water14 sq mi (40 km2)  6.1%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total22,945
 • Density100/sq mi (40/km2)
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional district1st
Websitewww.co.new-kent.va.us

New Kent County is a county in the south eastern part the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of the 2020 United States Census, its population was 22,945.[1] Its county seat is New Kent.[2]

New Kent County is located east of the Greater Richmond Region and is part of the Richmond and the Hampton Roads Metropolitan Statistical Area.

YouTube Encyclopedic

  • 1/3
    Views:
    895
    533
    704
  • New Kent County Closeup
  • Keeping Your New Kent County home safe: outside bushes/windows
  • Brickshire, New Kent County Virginia - lizmoore.com/magazine/BrickshireHomes

Transcription

History

New Kent County was established in 1654, as the Virginia General Assembly with the governor's consent split York County.[3] The county's name originated because several prominent inhabitants, including William Claiborne, recently had been forced from their settlement at Kent Island, Maryland, by Lord Baltimore upon the formation of Maryland.[4] Claiborne had named the island for his birthplace in Kent, England. Chickahominy and Pamunkey Native Americans frequented this area, as well as nearby Charles City County and King William County, and both tribes remain well-established in this area.

The county had two parishes in the colonial era, initially called Blisland (which also included the older James City County as well as York County) and St. Peter's. Among the earliest settlers was Nicholas Gentry, who settled in New Kent in 1684. Parish registers of St. Peter's Parish show that Nicholas Gentry's daughter was baptized in the church in 1687.[5] In 1719 the Virginia General Assembly split New Kent County, and what had been established St. Paul's Parish became Hanover County.[6][7]

New Kent county's first brick courthouse was built by 1695, but it and two successors were destroyed in 1753 and 1775. Another fire in 1783 destroyed the clerk's office and jail, so few colonial era non-religious records remain. However, a manual entitled "The Office and Authority of a Justice of Peace" published in 1736 by county court justice George Webb, the son of London merchant Conrad Webb and whose son Lewis Webb would briefly represent New Kent county in the House of Burgesses and later in the House of Delegates during the American Revolutionary War.[8] Perhaps the county's most noteworthy patriot during the conflict was James, an enslaved man who became a double agent, and whose reports to the Marquis de Lafayette helped secure victory during the Siege of Yorktown months after British troops led by Lt. Gen. Charles Cornwallis passed through the county seat (and raided local plantations) in June 1781. In addition to men who enlisted in the army, New Kent county also established an American military hospital during the conflict. As the result of arson confessed to by John Price Posey and Thomas Green, and allegedly involving "a negro boy belonging to W. Chamberlayne", many later county records were burned, making identifying relationships between family members difficult.[9]

Two first ladiesMartha Washington and Letitia Christian Tyler – were born in New Kent County. The church where George and Martha Washington are believed to have been wed, St. Peter's, still holds services today.

Confederate and Union troops fought in as well as passed through New Kent County during the Peninsula Campaign of 1862. The Battle of New Market Heights in September 1864 proved a crucial victory as Federal forces pushed toward the capitol in the Richmond-Petersburg Campaign. A later courthouse, damaged during the Civil War, was replaced in 1909.

During the state's Massive Resistance crisis in the 1960s, the United States Supreme Court decision in Green v. County School Board of New Kent County (1968) limited the use of freedom of choice plans at publicly funded schools, where the actual operation of such plans delayed racial desegregation.

The historical ties to Hampton Roads stem from its location and the shared history of Virginia's colonial past. The region, known for its military bases, shipyards, and as a commercial and cultural hub, influences the surrounding counties, including New Kent. The proximity to Hampton Roads has led to economic and demographic growth in the county, with residents often commuting to the larger cities such as Newport News and Norfolk for work while enjoying the quieter, rural life that New Kent offers.

In 2006, the U.S. Census Bureau, which considers both New Kent County and Hanover County part of the Richmond metropolitan area (although it also is considered part of the Hampton Roads Region), rated New Kent County among the top 100 fastest-growing counties in the U.S.[10]

Geography

The northeast border of the county is defined by the meanderings of the Pamunkey River, and the southwest county border is similarly defined by the Chickahominy River. The county terrain consists of rolling hills, either wooded or devoted to agriculture, and carved by drainages.[11] The terrain slopes to the east and south, with its highest point on the west border at 174 ft (53 m) ASL.[12] The county has a total area of 223 sq mi (580 km2), of which 210 sq mi (540 km2) are land and 14 square miles (36 km2) (6.23%) are covered by water.

Quinton, VA[13]
Climate chart (explanation)
J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D
 
 
3.3
 
 
48
27
 
 
2.9
 
 
51
29
 
 
4
 
 
60
36
 
 
3.3
 
 
71
45
 
 
3.9
 
 
78
54
 
 
3.4
 
 
86
64
 
 
4.5
 
 
89
68
 
 
4.3
 
 
88
66
 
 
3.9
 
 
81
59
 
 
3.2
 
 
71
47
 
 
3.5
 
 
62
39
 
 
3.4
 
 
51
30
Average max. and min. temperatures in °F
Precipitation totals in inches
Metric conversion
J
F
M
A
M
J
J
A
S
O
N
D
 
 
84
 
 
9
−3
 
 
74
 
 
11
−2
 
 
102
 
 
16
2
 
 
84
 
 
22
7
 
 
99
 
 
25
12
 
 
86
 
 
30
18
 
 
114
 
 
32
20
 
 
109
 
 
31
19
 
 
99
 
 
27
15
 
 
81
 
 
22
9
 
 
89
 
 
17
4
 
 
86
 
 
11
−1
Average max. and min. temperatures in °C
Precipitation totals in mm

Adjacent counties

Protected areas[11]

Lakes[11]

  • Cooks Millpond
  • Davis Pond
  • Davis Pond North
  • Diascund Creek Reservoir
  • Goddins Pond
  • Kent Lake
  • Old Forge Pond
  • Richardson Millpond (part)
  • Taylor Pond

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.Note
17906,239
18006,3632.0%
18106,4781.8%
18206,6302.3%
18306,458−2.6%
18406,230−3.5%
18506,064−2.7%
18605,884−3.0%
18704,381−25.5%
18805,51525.9%
18905,511−0.1%
19004,865−11.7%
19104,682−3.8%
19204,541−3.0%
19304,300−5.3%
19404,092−4.8%
19503,995−2.4%
19604,50412.7%
19705,30017.7%
19808,78165.7%
199010,44519.0%
200013,46228.9%
201018,42936.9%
202022,94524.5%
2021 (est.)23,897[14]4.1%
U.S. Decennial Census[15]
1790-1960[16] 1900-1990[17]
1990-2000[18] 2010-2020[19]

2020 census

New Kent County, Virginia – Racial and ethnic composition
Note: the US Census treats Hispanic/Latino as an ethnic category. This table excludes Latinos from the racial categories and assigns them to a separate category. Hispanics/Latinos may be of any race.
Race / Ethnicity (NH = Non-Hispanic) Pop 2010[20] Pop 2020[19] % 2010 % 2020
White alone (NH) 14,804 17,818 80.33% 77.66%
Black or African American alone (NH) 2,474 2,714 13.42% 11.83%
Native American or Alaska Native alone (NH) 185 225 1.00% 0.98%
Asian alone (NH) 159 223 0.86% 0.97%
Pacific Islander alone (NH) 2 8 0.01% 0.03%
Some Other Race alone (NH) 21 102 0.11% 0.44%
Mixed Race or Multi-Racial (NH) 394 1,124 2.14% 4.90%
Hispanic or Latino (any race) 390 731 2.12% 3.19%
Total 18,429 22,945 100.00% 100.00%

2010 Census

As of the 2010 United States Census, 18,429 people were living in the county; 81.7% were White, 13.5% African American, 1.1% Native American, 0.9% Asian, 0.5% of some other race, and 2.3% of two or more races. About 2.1% were Hispanic or Latino (of any race). By ancestry, 15.2% were of English, 11.7% American, 10.6% German, and 9.4% Irish descent.[21]

At the 2000 United States Census, 13,462 people, 4,925 households and 3,895 families were residing in the county. The population density was 64.1 people per square mile (24.7 people/km2). The 5,203 housing units averaged 24.8 units per square mile (9.6 units/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 80.26% White, 16.20% African American, 1.29% Native American, 0.53% Asian, 0.54% from other races, and 1.17% from two or more races. About 1.31% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

Of the 4,925 households, 34.70% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 66.60% were married couples living together, 9.00% had a female householder with no husband present, and 20.90% were not families. About 16.60% of all households were made up of individuals, and 5.60% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.65, and the average family size was 2.97.

The county's age distribution was 25.00% under 18, 5.90% from 18 to 24, 32.00% from 25 to 44, 27.70% from 45 to 64, and 9.40% who were 65 or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 102.60 males. For every 100 females aged 18 and over, there were 99.90 males.

The median income for a household was $53,595, and for a family was $60,678. Males had a median income of $40,005 versus $28,894 for females. The per capita income for the county was $22,893. About 4.90% of the population and 3.40% of families were below the poverty line. Of the people living in poverty, 7.40% were under the age of 18 and 7.00% were 65 or older.

Notable People

Education

New Kent County has five schools within its school system.[22] The three elementary schools are New Kent Elementary, Quinton Elementary, and George W. Watkins Elementary. The school system also includes New Kent Middle School and New Kent High School. All five schools are fully accredited by the Virginia Department of Education. At the high-school level, various honors and advanced-placement courses are available, along with dual enrollment through Rappahannock Community College. Gifted and enrichment programs are offered in all grades kindergarten through 12th grade.[23]

The roughly 430 employees include 220 licensed teachers, seven guidance counselors, four media specialists, four principals, five assistant principals, and a central office staff composed of one superintendent and five directors.[24] As of 2018, the superintendent is Brian Nichols,[25] and the assistant superintendent is Ed Smith.

New Kent County received a new site for Rappahannock Community College in 2015,[26] located at the renovated "historic" New Kent High School site. The site offers engineering, nursing, and basic college-level courses in New Kent.

Transportation

Highways

  • Interstate 64 traverses the county, with four exits (205, 211, 214, and 220), roughly paralleling U.S. 60.
  • Major state highways include State Routes 30, 33, 106, 155, 249, and 273.

Railroads

No passenger rail stations are in New Kent County. The nearest Amtrak service is at stations in Williamsburg and Richmond.

Air

Attractions

Two golf courses are available in New Kent County:

  • The Golf Club at Brickshire[28]
  • The Club at Viniterra[29]

The Colonial Downs horse racing track is located in rural New Kent County.

Communities

No towns in New Kent County are incorporated. Unincorporated towns and communities include:

Census-designated place

Unincorporated communities[11]

Media

Politics

New Kent County is traditionally Republican. In only one national election since 1972 has the county selected the Democratic Party candidate.

United States presidential election results for New Kent County, Virginia[30]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 9,631 66.59% 4,621 31.95% 211 1.46%
2016 8,118 66.36% 3,546 28.99% 569 4.65%
2012 7,246 66.16% 3,555 32.46% 152 1.39%
2008 6,385 63.91% 3,493 34.96% 113 1.13%
2004 5,414 68.13% 2,443 30.75% 89 1.12%
2000 3,934 64.34% 2,055 33.61% 125 2.04%
1996 2,852 54.15% 1,859 35.30% 556 10.56%
1992 2,708 49.39% 1,738 31.70% 1,037 18.91%
1988 2,917 66.54% 1,427 32.55% 40 0.91%
1984 2,679 68.71% 1,204 30.88% 16 0.41%
1980 1,739 57.30% 1,204 39.67% 92 3.03%
1976 1,259 47.62% 1,338 50.61% 47 1.78%
1972 1,370 67.52% 633 31.20% 26 1.28%
1968 526 27.63% 765 40.18% 613 32.20%
1964 677 49.60% 684 50.11% 4 0.29%
1960 526 51.67% 481 47.25% 11 1.08%
1956 510 57.95% 178 20.23% 192 21.82%
1952 455 52.78% 400 46.40% 7 0.81%
1948 140 27.24% 277 53.89% 97 18.87%
1944 158 32.44% 329 67.56% 0 0.00%
1940 133 31.74% 286 68.26% 0 0.00%
1936 120 28.10% 307 71.90% 0 0.00%
1932 115 28.33% 286 70.44% 5 1.23%
1928 217 54.94% 178 45.06% 0 0.00%
1924 86 30.82% 178 63.80% 15 5.38%
1920 109 36.45% 190 63.55% 0 0.00%
1916 69 26.14% 192 72.73% 3 1.14%
1912 30 12.66% 160 67.51% 47 19.83%

See also

References

  1. ^ "New Kent County, Virginia". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ "Notes from the Records of York County". The William and Mary Quarterly. 22 (2): 73–89. April 5, 2018. doi:10.2307/1914974. JSTOR 1914974.
  4. ^ Claiborne, J. Herbert (April 5, 2018). "William Claiborne of Kent Island". The William and Mary Quarterly. 1 (2): 74–99. doi:10.2307/1923023. JSTOR 1923023.
  5. ^ Gentry, Richard (April 5, 2018). "The Gentry family in America: 1676 to 1909, including notes on the following families related to the Gentrys: Claiborne, Harris, Hawkins, Robinson, Smith, Wyatt, Sharp, Fulkerson, Butler, Bush, Blythe, Pabody, Noble, Haggard, and Tindall". Printed for the author by the Grafton press. Retrieved April 5, 2018 – via Google Books.
  6. ^ "OUR HISTORY". St. Paul's Episcopal Church. Retrieved March 11, 2018.
  7. ^ St. Paul's parish, Hanover co., Va.St. Paul's parish, Hanover co., Va. (1940). The vestry book of St. Paul's parish, Hanover county, Virginia, 1706-1786. Richmond,Division of purchase and printing, 1940. p. 595. hdl:2027/mdp.39015011026666.{{cite book}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  8. ^ Lyon Gardiner Tyler, (1915) vol. 1 pp. 354-355
  9. ^ "New Kent County". The William and Mary Quarterly. 4 (2): 115–116. April 5, 1895. doi:10.2307/1915053. JSTOR 1915053.
  10. ^ "100 Fastest Growing Counties". US Census Bureau.
  11. ^ a b c d New Kent County VA  Google Maps (accessed 4 April 2019)
  12. ^ ""Find an Altitude/New Kent County VA" Google Maps (accessed 4 April 2019)". Archived from the original on May 21, 2019. Retrieved April 4, 2019.
  13. ^ http://www.usa.com/quinton-va-weather.htm#HistoricalTemperature [bare URL]
  14. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Counties: April 1, 2020 to July 1, 2021". Retrieved April 6, 2022.
  15. ^ "Census of Population and Housing from 1790". US Census Bureau. Retrieved January 24, 2022.
  16. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved January 4, 2014.
  17. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". US Census Bureau. Retrieved January 4, 2014.
  18. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). US Census Bureau. Archived (PDF) from the original on October 9, 2022. Retrieved January 4, 2014.
  19. ^ a b "P2 Hispanic or Latino, and Not Hispanic or Latino by Race – 2020: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - New Kent County, Virginia". United States Census Bureau.
  20. ^ "P2 Hispanic or Latino, and Not Hispanic or Latino by Race –- 2010: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - New Kent County, Virginia". United States Census Bureau.
  21. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved April 5, 2018.
  22. ^ "New Kent County Schools". schoolwebpages.com. Archived from the original on March 31, 2017. Retrieved April 5, 2018.
  23. ^ Education, Virginia Department of. "VDOE :: Gifted Education". www.doe.virginia.gov. Retrieved April 5, 2018.
  24. ^ "NK Educational Foundation". nkeducationalfoundation.org. Retrieved April 5, 2018.
  25. ^ "New Kent County Schools". schoolwebpages.com. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved April 5, 2018.
  26. ^ "Open House and Fair launch RCC's New Kent County site - Rappahannock Community College". Rappahannock Community College. Archived from the original on February 6, 2016. Retrieved January 29, 2016.
  27. ^ "AirNav: W96 - New Kent County Airport". www.airnav.com. Retrieved April 5, 2018.
  28. ^ "The Golf Club at Brickshire – Providence Forge VA". www.brickshiregolfclub.com. Retrieved December 21, 2018.
  29. ^ "Club at Viniterra – New Kent VA". www.viniterragolf.com. Retrieved December 21, 2018.
  30. ^ Leip, David. "Atlas of US Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved December 9, 2020.

External links

37°31′N 77°00′W / 37.51°N 77.00°W / 37.51; -77.00

This page was last edited on 9 April 2024, at 00:12
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.