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New Jersey Juvenile Justice Commission

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The New Jersey Juvenile Justice Commission is a state agency of New Jersey, headquartered in Ewing Township, near Trenton.[1][2][3] The commission, under the office of the Attorney General of New Jersey, provides youth correctional services.

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Facilities

The New Jersey Training School, the JJC's largest facility, houses around 300 boys.[4] It is in Monroe Township, Middlesex County.[5]

The state's other secure facilities are located in the Johnstone Campus in Bordentown. All adjudicated girls go to the Johnstone Campus Juvenile Female Secure Care and Intake Facility, which has a capacity for 52 inmates.[6] There are detention cells which may hold up to 8 girls. Normally the entire girls' area may house up to 48 girls.[7] Boys go to Juvenile Medium Security Facility-North Compound (JMSF-N) and the Juvenile Medium Security Facility-South Compound (JMSF-S); these two parts altogether may house up to 262 inmates.[6] As of 2015 about 118 boys live in the medium compound.[8]

In 1996 the state opened a boot camp for juvenile offenders.[9] The commission did a study which concluded that of the males who went to the boot camp between February 1997 and August 1999, within a two year period of completing the program 80% had later been arrested.[10]

References

  1. ^ "Contact Us." New Jersey Juvenile Justice Commission. Retrieved on August 12, 2010.
  2. ^ "Zoning Map." Township of Ewing. Retrieved on August 12, 2010.
  3. ^ "Ewing township, Mercer County, New Jersey Archived 2011-06-08 at the Wayback Machine." U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved on August 12, 2010.
  4. ^ "New Jersey Training School." New Jersey Juvenile Justice Commission. Retrieved on August 12, 2010.
  5. ^ "New Jersey Training School ." New Jersey Juvenile Justice Commission. Retrieved on December 16, 2015. "Grace Hill Road Monroe Township, NJ 08831"
  6. ^ a b "Johnstone Campus." New Jersey Juvenile Justice Commission. Retrieved on August 12, 2010.
  7. ^ "The Female Secure Care and Intake Facility." New Jersey Juvenile Justice Commission. Retrieved on December 16, 2015. "Burlington Street Bordentown, NJ 08505"
  8. ^ " Juvenile Medium Security Facility (JMSF)." New Jersey Juvenile Justice Commission. Retrieved on December 16, 2015. "Burlington Street Bordentown, NJ 08505"
  9. ^ Diamond, Randy. "Whitman's hopes for boot camp not realized" (Archive). The Bergen Record. Sunday July 29, 2001. Retrieved on December 29, 2015.
  10. ^ Diamond, Randy. "Graduates of N.J. boot camps face old pressures back home" (Archive). The Bergen Record. Sunday July 29, 2001. Retrieved on December 29, 2015.

External links

This page was last edited on 11 April 2020, at 18:36
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