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New Jersey's 9th congressional district

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

New Jersey's 9th congressional district
New Jersey's 9th congressional district (2013).svg
District map as of 2013
Representative
  Bill Pascrell
DPaterson
Distribution
  • 100% urban
  • 0% rural
Population (2019)762,322[1]
Median household
income
$81,431[2]
Ethnicity
Cook PVID+13[3]

New Jersey's 9th congressional district is represented in Congress by Democrat Bill Pascrell, who resides in Paterson. Congressman Pascrell was first elected in 1996 from the old 8th district, defeating incumbent William J. Martini. The 9th district consists largely of municipalities in Bergen County and Passaic County.

History

Due to redistricting following the 2010 Census, portions of the old 9th district were shifted to the 5th district and the new 8th district, as part of a reduction in congressional districts from 13 to 12 in New Jersey. The new congressional map resulted in Pascrell's hometown of Paterson being added to the 9th district, which had been represented by Steve Rothman, a fellow Democrat who, like Pascrell, entered Congress after winning a seat in the 1996 election. In 2012, both incumbents ran for their party's nomination for the seat in the June primary, which Pascrell won. Later that year, Pascrell defeated Rabbi Shmuley Boteach, the Republican nominee, in the general election.

Counties and municipalities in the district

For the 113th and successive Congresses (based on redistricting following the 2010 Census), the district contains all or portions of three counties and 35 municipalities:[4]

Bergen County (27):

Carlstadt, Cliffside Park, Cresskill, East Rutherford, Edgewater, Elmwood Park, Englewood, Englewood Cliffs, Fort Lee, Garfield, Hasbrouck Heights, Leonia, Little Ferry, Lyndhurst, Moonachie, North Arlington, Palisades Park, Ridgefield, Ridgefield Park, Rutherford, Saddle Brook, South Hackensack, Teaneck (part, also 5th), Tenafly, Teterboro, Wallington and Wood-Ridge

Hudson County (2):

Kearny (part, also 8th), Secaucus

Passaic County (6):

Clifton, Haledon, Hawthorne, Passaic, Paterson and Prospect Park

Voting

Election results from presidential races
Year Office Results
2020 President Biden 62 - 36%
2016 President Clinton 64 - 33%
2012 President Obama 68 - 31%
2008 President Obama 61 - 38%
2004 President Kerry 59 - 41%
2000 President Gore 63 - 34%

List of members representing the district

Member
(District Home)
Party Years Cong
ress
Electoral history Counties/Towns
District created March 4, 1903
Allan Benny (New Jersey Congressman).jpg

Allan Benny
(Bayonne)
Democratic March 4, 1903 –
March 3, 1905
58th Elected in 1902.
Lost re-election.
Hudson County (except parts of Jersey City)
Marshall Van Winkle (New Jersey Congresman).jpg

Marshall Van Winkle
(Hoboken)
Republican March 4, 1905 –
March 3, 1907
59th Elected in 1904.
Retired.
Eugene W. Leake
(Jersey City)
Democratic March 4, 1907 –
March 3, 1909
60th Elected in 1906.
Retired.
Eugene Francis Kinkead.jpg

Eugene F. Kinkead
(Jersey City)
Democratic March 4, 1909 –
March 3, 1913
61st
62nd
Elected in 1908.
Re-elected in 1910.
Redistricted to the 8th district.
WalterIMcCoy.jpg

Walter I. McCoy
(South Orange)
Democratic March 4, 1913 –
October 3, 1914
63rd Redistricted from the 8th district and re-elected in 1912.
Resigned on appointment as Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the District of Columbia.
Parts of Essex (East Orange, Orange, and parts of South Orange and Newark)
Vacant October 3, 1914 –
December 1, 1914
Richard W. Parker (New Jersey).jpg

Richard W. Parker
(Newark)
Republican December 1, 1914 –
March 3, 1919
63rd
64th
65th
Elected to finish McCoy's term.
Also elected to the next full term.
Re-elected in 1916.
Lost re-election.
DanielMinahan.jpg

Daniel F. Minahan
(East Orange)
Democratic March 4, 1919 –
March 3, 1921
66th Elected in 1918.
Lost re-election.
Richard W. Parker (New Jersey).jpg

Richard W. Parker
(Newark)
Republican March 4, 1921 –
March 3, 1923
67th Elected in 1920.
Lost re-election.
DanielMinahan.jpg

Daniel F. Minahan
(East Orange)
Democratic March 4, 1923 –
March 3, 1925
68th Elected in 1922.
Lost re-election.
Franklin W. Fort (New Jersey Congressman).jpg

Franklin William Fort
(Newark)
Republican March 4, 1925 –
March 3, 1931
69th
70th
71st
Elected in 1924.
Re-elected in 1926.
Re-elected in 1928.
Retired to run for U.S. senator.
Peter A. Cavicchia (New Jersey Congressman).png

Peter Angelo Cavicchia
(Newark)
Republican March 4, 1931 –
March 3, 1933
72nd Elected in 1930.
Redistricted to the 11th district.
Edward Aloysius Kenney (New Jersey Congressman).jpg

Edward Aloysius Kenney
(Cliffside Park)
Democratic March 4, 1933 –
January 27, 1938
73rd
74th
75th
Elected in 1932.
Re-elected in 1934.
Re-elected in 1936.
Died.
Parts of Bergen and Hudson (North Bergen)
Vacant January 27, 1938 –
January 3, 1939
75th
Frank C. Osmers Jr. (New Jersey Congressman).jpg

Frank C. Osmers Jr.
(Haworth)
Republican January 3, 1939 –
January 3, 1943
76th
77th
Elected in 1938.
Re-elected in 1940.
Retired to become a second lieutenant in the 77th Infantry Division.
Harry L. Towe (New Jersey Congressman).jpg

Harry Lancaster Towe
(Rutherford)
Republican January 3, 1943 –
September 7, 1951
78th
79th
80th
81st
82nd
Elected in 1942.
Re-elected in 1944.
Re-elected in 1946.
Re-elected in 1948.
Re-elected in 1950.
Resigned to become Assistant Attorney General of New Jersey for Bergen County.
Vacant September 7, 1951 –
November 6, 1951
82nd
Frank C. Osmers Jr. (New Jersey Congressman).jpg

Frank C. Osmers Jr.
(Haworth)
Republican November 6, 1951 –
January 3, 1965
82nd
83rd
84th
85th
86th
87th
88th
Elected to finish Towe's term.
Re-elected in 1952.
Re-elected in 1954.
Re-elected in 1956.
Re-elected in 1958.
Re-elected in 1960.
Re-elected in 1962.
Lost re-election.
Henry Helstoski.png

Henry Helstoski
(East Rutherford)
Democratic January 3, 1965 –
January 3, 1977
89th
90th
91st
92nd
93rd
94th
Elected in 1964.
Re-elected in 1966.
Re-elected in 1968.
Re-elected in 1970.
Re-elected in 1972.
Re-elected in 1974.
Lost re-election.
[data unknown/missing]
1967–1969
southern Bergen (Bogota, Carlstadt, Cliffside Park, East Rutherford, Fairview, Fort Lee, Garfield, Hackensack, Hasbrouck Heights, Leonia, Little Ferry, Lodi, Lyndhurst, Maywood, Moonachie, North Arlington, Palisades Park, Saddle Brook, South Hackensack, Ridgefield, Ridgefield Park, Rochelle Park, Rutherford, Teaneck, Teterboro, Wallington, Wood-Ridge)
1969–1971
Eastern Bergen
1971–1973
[data unknown/missing]
1973–1977
Eastern Bergen and parts of Hudson
HollenbeckHC.png

Harold C. Hollenbeck
(East Rutherford)
Republican January 3, 1977 –
January 3, 1983
95th
96th
97th
Elected in 1976.
Re-elected in 1978.
Re-elected in 1980.
Lost re-election.
Rep Robert Torricelli.jpg

Robert Torricelli
(New Milford)
Democratic January 3, 1983 –
January 3, 1997
98th
99th
100th
101st
102nd
103rd
104th
Elected in 1982.
Re-elected in 1984.
Re-elected in 1986.
Re-elected in 1988.
Re-elected in 1990.
Re-elected in 1992.
Re-elected in 1994.
Retired to run for U.S. senator.
1983–1985
eastern Bergen
1985–1993
Parts of Bergen and Hudson
1993–1997
Parts of Bergen and Hudson
Steve Rothman, official photo portrait color.jpg

Steve Rothman
(Englewood)
Democratic January 3, 1997 –
January 3, 2013
105th
106th
107th
108th
109th
110th
111th
112th
Elected in 1996.
Re-elected in 1998.
Re-elected in 2000.
Re-elected in 2002.
Re-elected in 2004.
Re-elected in 2006.
Re-elected in 2008.
Re-elected in 2010.
Lost renomination.
2003–2013
NJ09congressdistrict.gif

Parts of Bergen, Hudson (parts of Jersey City, Kearney, North Bergen and Secaucus) and Passaic (Hawthorne)
Bill pascrell 375.jpg

Bill Pascrell
(Paterson)
Democratic January 3, 2013 –
Present
113th
114th
115th
116th
117th
Redistricted from the 8th district and re-elected in 2012.
Re-elected in 2014.
Re-elected in 2016.
Re-elected in 2018.
Re-elected in 2020.
2013–present
Parts of Bergen, Hudson (Secaucus and parts of Kearny), and Passaic (Clifton, Haledon, Hawthorne, Passaic, Paterson and Prospect Park)

Recent election results

2012

New Jersey's 9th congressional district, 2012[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bill Pascrell (incumbent) 162,822 74.0
Republican Shmuley Boteach 55,091 25.0
Independent E. David Smith 1,138 0.5
Constitution Jeanette Woolsey 1,082 0.5
Total votes 220,133 100.0
Democratic hold

2014

New Jersey's 9th congressional district, 2014[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bill Pascrell (Incumbent) 82,498 68.5
Republican Dierdre G. Paul 36,246 30.1
Independent Nestor Montilla 1,715 1.4
Total votes 120,459 100.0
Democratic hold

2016

New Jersey's 9th congressional district, 2016[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bill Pascrell (incumbent) 162,642 69.8
Republican Hector L. Castillo 65,376 28.0
Libertarian Diego Rivera 3,327 1.4
Independent Jeff Boss 1,897 0.8
Total votes 233,242 100.0
Democratic hold

2018

New Jersey's 9th congressional district, 2018[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bill Pascrell Jr. (incumbent) 140,832 70.3
Republican Eric P. Fisher 57,854 28.9
Libertarian Claudio Belusic 1,730 0.9
Total votes 200,416 100.0
Democratic hold

2020

New Jersey's 9th congressional district, 2020[9]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bill Pascrell Jr. (incumbent) 203,674 65.8
Republican Billy Prempeh 98,629 31.9
Independent Chris Auriemma 7,239 2.3
Total votes 309,542 100.0
Democratic hold

References

  1. ^ https://www.census.gov/mycd/?st=34&cd=09
  2. ^ https://www.census.gov/mycd/?st=34&cd=09
  3. ^ "Introducing the 2021 Cook Political Report Partisan Voter Index". The Cook Political Report. April 15, 2021. Retrieved April 15, 2021.
  4. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed November 6, 2016.
  5. ^ "Election Information" (PDF). NJ Department of State. November 6, 2012. Retrieved March 9, 2018.
  6. ^ Haas, Karen L. (March 9, 2015). "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 4, 2014". Clerk of the U.S. House of Representatives. Retrieved October 28, 2019.
  7. ^ "Election Information" (PDF). NJ Department of State. November 8, 2016. Retrieved December 8, 2016.
  8. ^ Johnson, Cheryl L. (February 28, 2019). "Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 6, 2018". Clerk of the U.S. House of Representatives. Retrieved April 27, 2019.
  9. ^ "Official General Election Results: U.S. House of Representatives" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. Retrieved December 7, 2020.

External links

This page was last edited on 28 April 2021, at 23:36
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