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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Nana Bryant
Nana Bryant (1948).JPG
Bryant in 1948
Born
Nana Irene Bryant

(1888-11-23)November 23, 1888
DiedDecember 24, 1955(1955-12-24) (aged 67)
Resting placeValhalla Memorial Park Cemetery
OccupationActress
Years active1935–1955
Spouse(s)Ted MacLean
(m. 19??)

Nana Irene Bryant (November 23, 1888 – December 24, 1955) was an American film, stage, and television actress. She appeared in more than 100 films between 1935 and 1955.

Biography

Bryant was born 1888 in Cincinnati, Ohio.[citation needed]

She appeared in stock companies in Los Angeles and San Francisco, and spent several seasons on tour. She also played on Broadway, appearing in the then non-singing role of Morgan le Fay in Rodgers and Hart's A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court, before working in films. Her other Broadway credits included Marriage Is for Single People (1945), Baby Pompadour (1934), A Ship Comes In (1934), The First Apple (1933), The Dubarry (1932), The Stork is Dead (1932), Heigh-Ho, Everybody (1932), The Padre (1926), The Wild Rose (1926), No More Women (1926), The Firebrand (1924).[1]

Bryant had a supporting role in the Frank Morgan Show, a summer replacement for Jack Benny's program in 1946.[2]

On television, Bryant played Connie's mother in The First Hundred Years[3]: 344  and Mrs. Nestor in Our Miss Brooks.[3] She also made several appearances as the mother of Margaret Williams (Jean Hagen) during the first three seasons of Make Room for Daddy.[citation needed]

Bryant appeared for the first time in a musical role October 1 to November 1, 1912 in The Man Who Owns Broadway. This was at Morosco's Burbank Theatre produced by David M. Hartford. Her role was Sylvia, Anthony Bridwell's daughter. She sang Song of the Soul in Act 1 and I'm in love with one of the stars. She was accompanied by Sophia Caldwell of Wheeling, W. Virginia in the Chorus. Ms. Caldwell was then studying for the opera. [4]

Bryant was married to writer Ted MacLean.[5]

Bryant died in Hollywood, California. She was buried in Valhalla Memorial Park Cemetery.[citation needed]

Partial filmography

References

  1. ^ "Nana Bryant". Internet Broadway Database. The Broadway League. Archived from the original on March 26, 2019. Retrieved March 26, 2019.
  2. ^ "Morgan Replaces Benny For Summer on Nets" (PDF). Broadcasting. May 27, 1946. p. 16. Retrieved March 26, 2019.
  3. ^ a b Terrace, Vincent (2011). Encyclopedia of Television Shows, 1925 through 2010 (2nd ed.). Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers. p. 798. ISBN 978-0-7864-6477-7.
  4. ^ Brochure from the show and Personal Scrap Book of Sophia Caldwell McCrystal in the Larry Roeder Archives.
  5. ^ "Miss Nana Bryant, at Seattle Theatre, Just Couldn't Stay Away From Spotlight's Glare". The Seattle Star. Washington, Seattle. April 19, 1913. p. 7. Retrieved March 26, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.

External links

This page was last edited on 8 February 2022, at 11:09
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