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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

NBR K class
LNER Class D26 / D32 / D33 / D34
Eastfield Locomotive Depot A North British 'Glen' 4-4-0 geograph-2328704-by-Ben-Brooksbank.jpg
62477 Glen Dochart on Eastfield Locomotive Depot, Glasgow, September 1957
Type and origin
Power typeSteam
DesignerD26, Matthew Holmes
D32/D33/D34, William P. Reid
BuilderNBR Cowlairs works
Build date1903–1920
Total produced68
Specifications
Configuration:
 • Whyte4-4-0
Gauge4 ft 8 12 in (1,435 mm) standard gauge
Leading dia.3 ft 6 in (1.067 m)
Driver dia.D26, 6 ft 6 in (1.981 m)
D32/D33/D34, 6 ft 0 in (1.829 m)
LengthD34, 17.068 m (56.00 ft) D26,17.145 m (56.25 ft)
Loco weightD26, 52 long tons (53 t; 58 short tons)
D32/1, 53 long tons (54 t; 59 short tons)
D32/2, 53.7 long tons (54.6 t)
D33, 54.05 long tons (54.92 t; 60.54 short tons)
D34, 57.2 long tons (58.1 t; 64.1 short tons)
Tender weightD26/D32, 40 long tons (41 t; 45 short tons)
D33, 44.6 long tons (45.3 t)
D34, 46.65 long tons (47.40 t)
Fuel typeCoal
Boiler pressureD26/D32/1/D33, 190 psi (1.3 MPa)
D32/2/D34, 180 psi (1.2 MPa)
CylindersTwo inside
Cylinder sizeD26/D32/D33, 19 in × 26 in (483 mm × 660 mm)
D34, 20 in × 26 in (508 mm × 660 mm)
Performance figures
Tractive effortD26, 19,434 lbf (86.45 kN)
D32/1/D33, 21,053 lbf (93.65 kN)
D32/2, 19,945 lbf (88.72 kN)
D34, 22,100 lbf (98 kN)
Career
OperatorsNBR » LNER » BR
Power classBR: 3P (except D26)
NicknamesGlen class (D34 only)
DispositionOne preserved, remainder scrapped

The NBR K class is a class of 4-4-0 steam locomotive of the North British Railway. The first batch (later LNER Class D26) was designed by Matthew Holmes in 1902 and had 6-foot-6-inch (1.981 m) driving wheels for express passenger work. Three more batches (later LNER Classes D32, D33, and D34) were designed by William P. Reid with 6-foot-0-inch (1.829 m) driving wheels for mixed traffic work. This included perishable goods, such as fish from Mallaig and Aberdeen. They had inside cylinders and Stephenson valve gear. The D34 locomotives, commonly known as Glen Class, were built with superheaters. The LNER later fitted superheaters to all D26, D32, and D33 engines as well. All engines of the K class are sometimes known as Glen Class, although the designation is strictly reserved to the fourth (D34) batch.

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Transcription

Contents

LNER classes

The LNER divided the NBR K class into four classes, as below. It was common practice for the North British Railway to assign similar engines to the same class group, whereas the LNER system allowed only identical engines to bear the same class designation.

LNER Class D26

Twelve engines ordered in March 1902 and built at Cowlairs railway works in 1903. Three were withdrawn in 1922, leaving nine to enter LNER ownership in 1923. These nine had all been withdrawn by July 1926.[1]

LNER Class D32

Twelve engines ordered in 1905 and built at Cowlairs in 1906–07. The LNER began to fit superheated boilers in 1923 and classified the superheated locomotives D32/2. The non-superheated locomotives were classified D32/1.[2]

LNER Class D33

Twelve engines built at Cowlairs in 1909–10. The LNER fitted superheaters to all the D33s between 1925 and 1936.[3]

LNER Class D34

Ten engines built at Cowlairs in 1913. Twenty-two engines built between 1917 and 1920. All the D34s were built with superheaters. They are known as the Glen Class, as all engines in the group were named after Scottish glens.[4]

Post-NBR

The locomotives passed to the London and North Eastern Railway (LNER) in 1923 and, some of them, to British Railways (BR) in 1948. BR numbers [5] were:

  • D32, five locomotives, 62445-62454 (with gaps)
  • D33, nine locomotives, 62455-62466 (with gaps)
  • D34, thirty locomotives, 62467-62498 (with gaps)

Accidents and incidents

  • On 28 December 1906, locomotive No. 324 was hauling an express passenger train that was in a rear-end collision with a passenger train at Elliot Junction, Forfarshire. Twenty-two people were killed and eight were injured.[6]

Names

The D34s were named after Scottish Glens:

Number 2494 Glen Gour at Edinburgh Waverley railway station in August 1948.
Number 2494 Glen Gour at Edinburgh Waverley railway station in August 1948.
  • 62467 Glenfinnan
  • 62468 Glen Orchy
  • 62469 Glen Douglas
  • 62470 Glen Roy
  • 62471 Glen Falloch
  • 62472 Glen Nevis
  • 62473 Glen Spean
  • 62474 Glen Croe
  • 62475 Glen Beasdale
  • 62476 Glen Sloy
  • 62477 Glen Dochart
  • 62478 Glen Quoich
  • 62479 Glen Sheil
  • 62480 Glen Fruin
  • 62481 Glen Ogle
  • 62482 Glen Mamie
  • 62483 Glen Garry
  • 62484 Glen Lyon
  • 62485 Glen Murran
  • (62486 Glen Gyle)
  • 62487 Glen Arklet
  • 62488 Glen Aladale
  • 62489 Glen Dessary
  • 62490 Glen Fintaig
  • (62491 Glen Cona)
  • 62492 Glen Garvin
  • 62493 Glen Gloy
  • 62494 Glen Gour
  • 62495 Glen Luss
  • 62496 Glen Loy
  • 62497 Glen Mallie
  • 62498 Glen Moidart

No. 62494 was originally named Glen Gau, but since no glen of that name exists, it was renamed in July 1925, becoming Glen Gour.[7] Locos shown in brackets were withdrawn before Nationalisation

Preservation

In September 1962, a year after being withdrawn, number 62484 Glen Lyon waits to be scrapped.
In September 1962, a year after being withdrawn, number 62484 Glen Lyon waits to be scrapped.

Withdrawals began in 1946 and all the D34s had been withdrawn by 1961. One, 256 Glen Douglas (BR number 62469) has been preserved by the Scottish Railway Preservation Society. It is now on display at the Riverside Museum in Glasgow.

References

  1. ^ http://www.lner.info/locos/D/d26.shtml
  2. ^ http://www.lner.info/locos/D/d32.shtml
  3. ^ http://www.lner.info/locos/D/d33.shtml
  4. ^ http://www.lner.info/locos/D/d34.shtml
  5. ^ Ian Allan ABC of British Railways Locomotives, 1948 edition, part 4, page 20
  6. ^ Gerard, Malcolm; Hamilton, J. A. B. (1984) [1967]. Rails to Disaster. London: George Allen & Unwin. pp. 13–19. ISBN 0-04-385103-7.
  7. ^ Boddy, M.G.; Brown, W.A.; Fry, E.V.; Hennigan, W.; Manners, F.; Neve, E.; Tee, D.F.; Yeadon, W.B. (April 1968). Fry, E.V., ed. Locomotives of the L.N.E.R., part 4: Tender Engines - Classes D25 to E7. Kenilworth: RCTS. pp. 45, 48. ISBN 0-901115-01-0.

External links

This page was last edited on 10 October 2018, at 15:30
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