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My Mistake (Was to Love You)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

"My Mistake (Was to Love You)"
Single by Diana Ross & Marvin Gaye
from the album Diana & Marvin
Released January 1974
Recorded 1973
Genre Soul
Length 2:55
Label Motown
Songwriter(s) Gloria Jones
Pam Sawyer
Producer(s) Hal Davis
Diana Ross & Marvin Gaye singles chronology
"You're a Special Part of Me"
(1973)
"My Mistake (Was to Love You)"
(1974)
"You Are Everything"
(1974)
"You're a Special Part of Me"
(1973)
"My Mistake (Was to Love You)"
(1974)
"You Are Everything"
(1974)

"My Mistake (Was to Love You)" is a song recorded as a duet by Diana Ross and Marvin Gaye which was the second single released off the singers' duet album Diana & Marvin in February 1974. One of the original songs featured on that album, "My Mistake (Was to Love You)" was written by Gloria Jones and Pam Sawyer, the team responsible for the Gladys Knight & the Pips' classic "If I Were Your Woman". Pam Sawyer was also the co-writer (with Michael Masser) of the Diana Ross hit "Last Time I Saw Him" which dropped out of the Top 40 just prior to the Top 40 debut of "My Mistake (Was to Love You)" in March 1974: Sawyer would subsequently co-write (with Marilyn Mcleod) Diana Ross' 1976 #1 hit "Love Hangover". The narrative of "My Mistake (Was to Love You)" outlines how two lovers' relationship fell apart because the man, according to the woman, felt as if "a girl loves you, you only call them weak", while the man admits that he let his lover "slip through, like grains of sand". The song peaked at #15 on the Billboard R&B singles chart and #19 on the Billboard Pop singles chart.[1].

Personnel

References

  1. ^ Whitburn, Joel (2004). Top R&B/Hip-Hop Singles: 1942-2004. Record Research. p. 226. 


This page was last edited on 15 November 2017, at 14:59.
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