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Mongolian cuisine

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Boortsog, aaruul, and ul boov (fr)
Boortsog, aaruul, and ul boov (fr)

Mongolian cuisine primarily consists of dairy products, meat, and animal fats. The most common rural dish is cooked mutton. In the city, steamed dumplings filled with meat—"buuz"— are popular.

The extreme continental climate of Mongolia has influenced the traditional diet. Use of vegetables and spices are limited. Due to geographic proximity and deep historic ties with China and Russia, Mongolian cuisine is also influenced by Chinese and Russian cuisine.[1]

YouTube Encyclopedic

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  • What Happens If You Eat Raw Meat

Transcription

Hello everyone. Sushi restaurants are nearly as rampant as Starbucks stores. So you probably wonder why is raw fish okay to consume, while raw beef, pork and other land animals are typically not on the menu? For one thing, the parasites and bacteria that set up shop in raw animal meat are different and more dangerous than the ones you'd find in raw fish. From salmonella and parasitic E. coli to worms, flukes, and the virus hepatitis E, the creepy crawlies that may inhabit raw meat tend to be more harmful to humans than the microorganisms you'd find in raw fish. When it comes to that, it's because our bodies are more closely related to land animals than to those of fish. The way animals are slaughtered and packaged also has a lot to do with their health risks. Parasites and bacteria tend to come from an animal's gut, not its muscle. If your butcher nicks open an animal's intestines, any harmful microorganisms released could contaminate all the meat the butcher is preparing. That aside, packaged ground beef is particularly likely to house sickness-causing bacteria or parasites. That's because a single package of ground beef could contain meat from dozens of cows. One contaminated animal could corrupt dozens of batches. For that reason also, you should never eat hamburger that's red or rare in the center. Whole cuts of beef are less risky because they come from a single animal because anything harmful lives on the surface of the meat, not inside the muscle. So if you like your steak very rare, just searing the outside will likely kill anything harmful. Nevertheless, you still have to watch out for something called "mechanically tenderized meat," which involves puncturing the beef with small needles or blades to make it more tender. Many restaurants and grocery stores sell meat that's undergone this process because it improves the texture of cheaper cuts like sirloin or round. This process can force contaminants into the muscle tissue where searing the outside won't kill them. You don't see this at high-end steakhouses, but it's an issue with steaks purchased for home cooking and in some restaurants . Most of these concerns and caveats also apply to lamb, pigs, chickens and other land animals, though pigs and chickens tend to carry some harmful microorganisms you don't find in cows or sheep. Fish is a different story. Setting aside the differences between fish and mammals when it comes to the number, type, and frequency of potentially dangerous organisms they may harbor, fish tends not to be ground or mixed. That lowers the likelihood of a single disease-carrying salmon or tuna contaminating others. Also, any raw fish you consume at a sushi restaurant are caught in colder waters and frozen before you eat them. This kills the encysted worms and other parasites. Unfortunately, freezing doesn't kill parasitic E. coli and many of the harmful microorganisms you'd find in meat. As for the conclusion, with raw fish, oysters and other uncooked seafood, you're taking a risk, though not nearly as big a risk as eating that bloody tenderloin or tartare.

Features

The nomads of Mongolia sustain their lives directly from the products of domesticated animals such as cattle, horses, camels, yaks, sheep, and goats, as well as game.[1] Meat is either cooked, used as an ingredient for soups and dumplings (buuz, khuushuur, bansh, manti), or dried for winter (borts).[1] The Mongolian diet includes a large proportion of animal fat which is necessary for the Mongols to withstand the cold winters and their hard work. Winter temperatures are as low as −40 °C (−40 °F) and outdoor work requires sufficient energy reserves. Milk and cream are used to make a variety of beverages, as well as cheese and similar products.[2]

The nomads on the countryside are self-supporting on principle. Travellers will find gers marked as guanz in regular intervals near the roadside, which operate as simple restaurants. In the ger, which is a portable dwelling structure (yurt is a Turkic word for a similar shelter, but the name is ger in Mongolian), Mongolians usually cook in a cast-iron or aluminum pot on a small stove, using wood or dry animal dung fuel (argal).

Common foods

Khorkhog
Khorkhog
Boodog
Boodog

The most common rural dish is cooked mutton, often without any other ingredients. In the city, every other local displays a sign saying "buuz". Those are steamed dumplings filled with meat. Other types of dumplings are boiled in water (bansh, manti), or deep fried in mutton fat (khuushuur). Other dishes combine the meat with rice or fresh noodles made into various stews (tsuivan (ru), budaatai huurga) or noodle soups (guriltai shol).

The most surprising cooking method is only used on special occasions. In this case, the meat (often together with vegetables) gets cooked with the help of stones, which have been preheated in a fire. This either happens with chunks of mutton in a sealed milk can (khorkhog), or within the abdominal cavity of a deboned goat or marmot (boodog).

Milk is boiled to separate the cream (öröm, clotted cream).[2] The remaining skimmed milk is processed into cheese (byaslag), dried curds (aaruul), yogurt, kefir, and a light milk liquor (shimiin arkhi). The most prominent national beverage is airag, which is fermented mare's milk.[2] A popular cereal is barley, which is fried and malted. The resulting flour (arvain guril) is eaten as a porridge in milk fat and sugar or drunk mixed in milky tea. The everyday beverage is salted milk tea (süütei tsai), which may turn into a robust soup by adding rice, meat, or bansh. As a result of the Russian influence during socialism, vodka has also gained some popularity[2] with a surprising number of local brands (usually grain spirits).

Horse meat is eaten in Mongolia and can be found in most grocery stores.

Mongolian sweets include boortsog, a type of biscuit or cookie eaten on special occasions.

Vodka is the most popular alcoholic beverage; Chinggis vodka (named for Genghis Khan) is the most popular brand, making up 30% of the distilled spirits market.[3]

References

  1. ^ a b c Marshall Cavendish Corporation, 2007, p. 268
  2. ^ a b c d Marshall Cavendish Corporation, 2007, p. 269
  3. ^ "CHINGGIS Vodka". www.behindcity.com. Retrieved 19 March 2018.
This page was last edited on 20 September 2018, at 05:03
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