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Missouri's 9th congressional district

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Missouri's 9th congressional district was a US congressional district, dissolved in 2013, that last encompassed rural Northeast Missouri, the area known as "Little Dixie," along with the larger towns of Columbia, Fulton, Kirksville and Union. Boone, Franklin, and a portion of St. Charles County comprise the highest voting centers of the mostly rural district. It was last represented by Republican Blaine Luetkemeyer.

Some of the most famous representatives to represent the 9th congressional district were Speaker of the House Champ Clark; James Broadhead, the first president of the American Bar Association; Clarence Cannon, chairman of the House Appropriations Committee; Isaac Parker, a judge depicted in True Grit; James Sidney Rollins, known as the "Father of the University of Missouri"; and Kenny Hulshof, unsuccessful candidate to become Governor of Missouri.

The district from 2003 to 2013
The district from 2003 to 2013

Dissolution following 2010 Census

The district was dissolved in 2013 after Missouri lost a congressional seat following the 2010 census. Initial redistricting maps placed most of the district north of the Missouri River in a redrawn 6th congressional district, and most of the rest of the district in a redrawn 3rd congressional district.[1] The last congressman from the old 9th, Luetkemeyer, transferred to the 3rd.

Voting

George W. Bush defeated John Kerry 59% to 41% in this district in 2004. In 2008, Rep. Kenny Hulshof announced that he would seek the Republican nomination for Governor of Missouri. As a whole, the 9th district leaned towards the Republican Party, with the exception being Columbia, which often leans towards the Democratic Party.

List of members representing the district

Representative Party Years Electoral history
District created March 4, 1863
James S. Rollins.jpg

James S. Rollins
Unionist March 4, 1863 –
March 3, 1865
Redistricted from the 2nd district
George W. Anderson Republican March 4, 1865 –
March 3, 1869
[Data unknown/missing.]
David P. Dyer Republican March 4, 1869 –
March 3, 1871
[Data unknown/missing.]
Andrew King Democratic March 4, 1871 –
March 3, 1873
[Data unknown/missing.]
Judge Isaac Parker.jpg

Isaac Parker
Republican March 4, 1873 –
March 3, 1875
Redistricted from the 7th district
David Rea Democratic March 4, 1875 –
March 3, 1879
[Data unknown/missing.]
NicholasFord.jpg

Nicholas Ford
Greenback March 4, 1879 –
March 3, 1883
[Data unknown/missing.]
James O. Broadhead.jpg

James Broadhead
Democratic March 4, 1883 –
March 3, 1885
[Data unknown/missing.]
John M. Glover Democratic March 4, 1885 –
March 3, 1889
[Data unknown/missing.]
NathanFrank.jpg

Nathan Frank
Republican March 4, 1889 –
March 3, 1891
[Data unknown/missing.]
SethWallaceCobb.jpg

Seth W. Cobb
Democratic March 4, 1891 –
March 3, 1893
Redistricted to the 12th district
ChampClark.jpg

Champ Clark
Democratic March 4, 1893 –
March 3, 1895
[Data unknown/missing.]
WilliamMTreloar.jpg

William M. Treloar
Republican March 4, 1895 –
March 3, 1897
[Data unknown/missing.]
ChampClark.jpg

Champ Clark
Democratic March 4, 1897 –
March 2, 1921
Died.
Vacant March 2, 1921 –
March 3, 1921
Theodore W. Hukriede Republican March 4, 1921 –
March 3, 1923
[Data unknown/missing.]
Clarence Cannon 2.jpg

Clarence Cannon
Democratic March 4, 1923 –
March 3, 1933
Redistricted to the At-large district
District inactive March 4, 1933 –
January 3, 1935
All representatives elected At-large on a general ticket
Clarence Cannon 2.jpg

Clarence Cannon
Democratic January 3, 1935 –
May 12, 1964
Redistricted from the At-large district,
Died.
Vacant May 12, 1964 –
November 3, 1964
William Hungate.jpg

William L. Hungate
Democratic November 3, 1964 –
January 3, 1977
[Data unknown/missing.]
HaroldVolkmer.jpg

Harold Volkmer
Democratic January 3, 1977 –
January 3, 1997
[Data unknown/missing.]
Rep Kenny Hulshof.jpg

Kenny Hulshof
Republican January 3, 1997 –
January 3, 2009
[Data unknown/missing.]
Blaine Luetkemeyer.jpg

Blaine Luetkemeyer
Republican January 3, 2009 –
January 3, 2013
Redistricted to the 3rd district
District eliminated January 3, 2013

Election results

199820002002200420062008

1998

United States House of Representatives elections in Missouri, 1998[2]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Kenny Hulshof (Incumbent) 117,196 62.2%
Democratic Linda Vogt 66,861 35.5%
Libertarian Robert Hoffman 4,248 2.3%
Total votes 188,305 100
Majority 46,087 24.4%
Turnout
Republican hold Swing

2000

United States House of Representatives elections in Missouri, 2000[3]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Kenny C. Hulshof (Incumbent) 172,787 59.3%
Democratic Steven R. Carroll 111,662 38.3%
Libertarian Robert Hoffman 3,608 1.2%
Green Devin M. Scherubel 2,388 0.8%
Reform Steven D. Dotson 1,165 0.4%
Total votes 291,610 100
Majority 53,964 18.6%
Turnout
Republican hold Swing

2002

United States House of Representatives elections in Missouri, 2002[4]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Kenny C. Hulshof (Incumbent) 146,032 68.2%
Democratic Donald M. Deichman 61,126 28.5%
Green Keith Brekhus 4,262 2.0%
Libertarian John Mruzik 2,705 1.3%
Total votes 214,125 100
Majority 77,939 36.4%
Turnout
Republican hold Swing

2004

United States House of Representatives elections in Missouri, 2004[5]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Kenny C. Hulshof (Incumbent) 193,429 64.6%
Democratic Linda Jacobsen 101,343 33.8%
Libertarian Tamara A. Millay 3,228 1.1%
Constitution Chris Earl 1,447 0.5%
Total votes 299,447 100
Majority 87,411 29.2%
Turnout
Republican hold Swing

2006

United States House of Representatives elections in Missouri, 2006[6]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Kenny C. Hulshof (Incumbent) 149,114 61.4%
Democratic Duane N. Burghard 87,145 35.9%
Libertarian Steve R. Headrick 3,925 1.6%
Progressive Bill Hastings 2,487 1.0%
Total votes 242,671 100
Majority 55,557 22.9%
Turnout
Republican hold Swing

2008

United States House of Representatives elections in Missouri, 2008[7]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Blaine Luetkemeyer 161,031 50.0%
Democratic Judy Baker 152,956 47.5%
Libertarian Tamara Millay 8,108 2.5%
Total votes 322,095 100
Majority -33 0%
Turnout
Republican hold Swing

2010

United States House of Representatives elections in Missouri, 2010[8]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Blaine Luetkemeyer 162,724 77.4%
Libertarian Christopher Dwyer 46,817 22.3%
Write-in 817 0.3%
Total votes 210,358 100
Majority 57,545 0%
Turnout
Republican hold Swing

References

  1. ^ "UPDATE: House Redistricting Committee Unveils Map". OzarksFirst.com. Archived from the original on 2011-05-11. Retrieved 2011-03-31.
  2. ^ 1998 Election Results
  3. ^ 2000 Election Results
  4. ^ 2002 Election Results
  5. ^ 2004 Election Results
  6. ^ 2006 Election Results
  7. ^ 2008 Election Results
  8. ^ 2008 Election Results
U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Illinois's 18th congressional district
Home district of the Speaker of the House
April 4, 1911 – March 4, 1919
Succeeded by
Massachusetts's 2nd congressional district

This page was last edited on 27 December 2018, at 01:08
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