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Michael Curtiz filmography

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Michael Curtiz in a 1928 portrait
Michael Curtiz in a 1928 portrait

Michael Curtiz (1886–1962) was a Hungarian-born American film director whose career spanned from 1912 to 1961. During this period he directed, wholly or in part, 181 films.[1] He began his cinematic career in Hungary, then moved to Austria and finally the United States. As his biographer Alan K. Rode notes, "A cinematic pioneer, Curtiz made a seamless transition from hand-cranking cameras in silent films to directing the first sound feature where the characters spoke their parts. He led the way in two- and three-color Technicolor, directed the first motion-picture produced in VistaVision, and worked extensively in CinemaScope."[2] Rode also notes that "he helmed rousing adventures, westerns, musicals, war movies, romances, historical dramas, horror films, tearjerkers, melodramas, comedies, spectacles, and film noirs."[3]

Born in Budapest, Curtiz graduated from Hungary's Royal Academy of Theatre and Art in 1906.[4] After six years as a stage actor and director he joined the nascent Hungarian film industry.[5] His first film credit was the 1912 drama, Maés Holnap ("Today and Tomorrow").[6] In 1913, after directing several films, Curtiz traveled to Denmark to hone his skills as an apprentice for director August Blom. Returning to Hungary, he became a freelance director for several film companies.[7] In 1919, Curtiz immigrated to Vienna and became one of Austria's top film directors. His first film there was Die Dame Mit Dem Schwarzen Handschuh ("The Lady with the Black Gloves", 1919), starring his wife, Lucy Doraine.[8] Among his subsequent Austrian films were the two-part epic Sodom and Gomorrah (1922) and Die Sklavenkönigin ("The Slave Queen", 1924). The latter film was released in the United Kingdom as The Moon of Israel. Harry Warner, one of the founders of Warner Bros., instructed his brother Jack to view the film. After doing so, they were impressed enough to offer Curtiz a contract to direct in the United States.[9][a]

In 1926, Curtiz began his American career with The Third Degree starring Dolores Costello. He followed this with several more films starring her, including the part-talking biblical epic Noah's Ark (1928). In 1932 and 1933, respectively, Curtiz directed the two-color Technicolor horror films Doctor X and Mystery of the Wax Museum, both starring Lionel Atwill and Fay Wray. In 1935, Curtiz directed the swashbuckling adventure Captain Blood, which made major stars of Errol Flynn and Olivia de Havilland. He followed this with several move adventure films starring them, including The Charge of the Light Brigade (1936), The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938), and Dodge City (1939), and Flynn in The Sea Hawk (1940). During this period, Curtiz also made the gangster films, Kid Galahad (1937), starring Edward G. Robinson, Bette Davis, and Humphrey Bogart, and Angels with Dirty Faces (1938) with James Cagney and Bogart, and the dramatic film Four Daughters (1939), which brought stardom to John Garfield.[11] In 1941, he directed Robinson and Garfield in The Sea Wolf.[12] During the war years (1941–1945), Curtiz directed James Cagney and Joan Crawford into Academy Award winning performances with, respectively, Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942) and Mildred Pierce (1945).[13] In between these, Curtiz directed his magnum opus, Casablanca (1942), with Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman, which won the Academy Award for Best Picture and Curtiz's only Academy Award for Best Director.[14]

In the post-war years, Curtiz directed Life with Father (1947), an adaptation of a popular Broadway play, and the film noir The Unsuspected (1948), his first film by his own production company.[15] For his company, he also produced and directed Romance on the High Seas (1948), a musical which marked the film debut of Doris Day.[16] Curtiz eventually disbanded his company and remained a contract director with Warner Bros. until 1954.[17] Among his later films under his Warners contract was another film noir, The Breaking Point, starring John Garfield.[18] After leaving Warner Bros., Curtiz directed White Christmas (1954) for Paramount Pictures, the first film in VistaVision and the highest-grossing film in his career.[19] Also for Paramount, he directed the Elvis Presley vehicle, King Creole (1958). In 1961, Curtiz directed his final film, The Comancheros, with John Wayne.[20]

For his contribution to cinema, Curtiz was awarded a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.[21] In the 1998 and 2007 listings of the American Film Institute's Greatest American Films, Casablanca ranked, respectively, in second and third place, while Yankee Doodle Dandy ranked 100 on the first list and 98 on the second.[22] As of 2018, four films directed by Curtiz have been added to the National Film Registry: The Adventures of Robin Hood, Casablanca, Mildred Pierce, and Yankee Doodle Dandy.[23]

Filmography

The filmography of Michael Curtiz is derived from the one presented in the biography by Alan K. Rode.[24]

Hungarian films: 1912–1913

Michael Curtiz was born Mano Kaminer in Budapest in 1886. In 1906, he graduated from Hungary's Royal Academy of Theatre and Art in 1906.[4] Under the stage name of Mihály Kertész, he established himself as a stage actor, performing in classical and modern theatrical dramas. Eventually he turned to directed as well.[25] In 1912, Kertész entered Hungary's motion picture industry as an actor and director for the Projectograph Film Company. His first film for them was also the company's initial feature.[26] All of Curtiz's films from this period are lost.[27]

Hungarian films: 1912–1913
Year Title Function Notes Ref
Original English translation Director Other
1912 Ma és holnap "Today and Tomorrow" Yes Yes Projectograph Production; Curtiz wrote the screenplay for this film and also played a supporting role [6]
1913 Krausz doktor a vérpadon "Doctor Krausz on the Scaffold" Yes Projectograph Production; a "sketch film"[b] [28]
1913 Gyerünk csak "Come On" Yes Projectograph Production; a "sketch film"[b] [28]
1913 Házasodik az uram "My Husband's Getting Married" Yes Projectograph Production; a "sketch film"[b] [28]

Danish film: 1913

In July 1913, Kertész left Hungary and travelled to Denmark to train as a film director. There he went to work for the Nordisk Film Company as an assistant director to August Blom.[29]

Danish film: 1913
Year Title Function Notes Ref
Director Other
1913 Atlantis Yes Nordisk Films Kompagni Production (Denmark); directed by August Blom; Curtiz played a supporting role in the film and was also an assistant director; prints survive [30]

Hungarian films: 1914–1919

After six months in Denmark, Mihály Kertész returned to Hungary. There he returned as a film director alternating between the Projectograph, Uher, and Kino-Riport companies.[31] With the coming of World War I in 1914, Kertész was called up by the Austro-Hungarian army and served as an artillery officer.[32] After being discharged in 1915, he resumed filmmaking and married actress Lucy Doraine, who would star in several of his films. In 1917, a new film company, Phönix-Film was formed by the merger of Projectagraph and Star-Film Productions.[33] Kertész served as their head of production until 1919.[31] Except were noted, all of the films from this period are lost.[27]

Hungarian films: 1914–1919
Year Title Function Notes Ref
Original English translation Director Other
1913 Mozikirály "Movie King" Yes Projectograph Production; features Sári Fedák; a "sketch film" [28]
1913 Az Utolsó Bohém "The Last Bohemian" Yes Projectograph Production; a "sketch film" [34]
1913 Kablélek "Captive Souls" Yes Projectograph Production; features Sári Fedák [35]
1914 Az Aranyásó "The Golddigger" Yes A "sketch film"; scenario by Ferenc Molnár; loosely based on a story by Bret Harte [36]
1914 A Hercegnó Pongtolája "The Princess in a Nightrobe" Yes Kino-Riport Production; "sketch film" [37]
1914 Az Éjzaka Katona "Prisoner of the Night" Yes Yes Projectograph Production; Curtiz acted in this film and wrote the screenplay as well as directed [38]
1914 A Szökött Katona "The Escaped Soldier" Yes Miklỏs Pảstory Production; screenplay by Miklós Pásztory [38]
1914 A Kölcsönkért Csecsemök "The Borrowed Babies" Yes Jenő Janovics Production; based on the stage play Baby Mine by Margaret Mayo [39]
1914 A Tolonc "The Undesirable" Yes Jenő Janovics Production; with Lili Berky and Victor Varconi; prints survive[c] [41]
1914 Bánk Bán "Bánk the Regent" Yes Jenő Janovics Production; based on the play by Ferenc Erkel [42]
1914 Sarga Liliom "Yellow Lily" Yes Directed by Fẻlix Vanyl; Curtiz played a supporting role in this film [43]
1915 A Paradicsom "The Tomato" Yes Projectograph Production; a "sketch film" [44]
1915 Akit Ketten Szeretnek "One Who Is Loved By Two" Yes Yes Projectograph Production; a "sketch film"; Curtiz starred as well as directed [44]
1915 Cox És Box "Cox and Box" Yes Proja Films; directed by Márton Garas; Curtiz played a supporting role in this film [43]
1916 A Bánat Assonya "Melancholy Lady" Yes Yes Screenplay by Curtiz [45]
1916 Makkhetes "Seven of Spades" Yes Kino-Riport Production [45]
1916 A Karthausi "The Carthusians" Yes Star-Film Production [45]
1916 A Doktor Úr "Mr. Doctor" Yes Kino-Riport Production; based on a play by Ferenc Molnár [46]
1916 Az Ezüst Kecske "The Medic" Yes Kino-Riport Production; based on a novel by Sándor Bródy [46]
1916 A Farkas "The Wolf" Yes Yes Kino-Riport Production; with Victor Varconi and Lucy Doraine; screenplay by Curtiz and Ladislaus Vajda [47]
1916 A Fekete Szivárvány "The Black Rainbow" Yes Kino-Riport Production; with Vilma Medgyaszay [48]
1916 A Magyar Föld Ereje "The Strength of the Fatherland" Yes A propaganda film for the Hungarian Red Cross [48]
1916 Károly és Zita királyné koronázása Budapesten "The Coronation of King Charles IV and Queen Zita in Budapest" Yes A depiction of the coronation of the last Habsburg monarchs; Curtiz may have directed this film and is seen filming a parade; prints survive [49]
1917 Halálcsengö "The Death-Bell" Yes Star-Film Production [33]
1917 Zoárd Mester "Master Zoard" Yes Yes Phönix-Film Production; screenplay by Curtiz [50]
1917 Tatárjárás "Tartar Invasion" Yes Yes Glória-Film Production; screenplay by Curtiz; a four-minute fragment survives [50]
1917 Az Árendás Zsidó "Jean the Tenant" Yes Phönix-Film Production [51]
1917 A Kuruzsló "The Charlatan" Yes Phönix-Film Production; based on a play by Imre Földes; remade by Curtiz as Namenlos ("Nameless", 1923) and Alias the Doctor (1933) [33]
1917 A Senki Fia "Nobody's Son" Yes Phönix-Film Production [50]
1917 A Szentjóbi Erdö Titka "Secret of St. Job Forest" Yes Phönix-Film Production; features Dezső Kertész (a.k.a. David Curtiz), the brother of Michael Curtiz [50]
1917 Az Utolsó Hajnal "The Last Dawn" Yes Phönix-Film Production; based on a novel by Alfred Deutsch-German; prints survive[d] [53]
1917 A Föld Embere "The Man Of The Earth" Yes Phönix-Film Production; with Oscar Beregi [51]
1917 A Vörös Sámson "The Red Samson" Yes Phönix-Film Production; with Tivadar Uray [54]
1917 A Béke Útja "Peace's Road" Yes Phönix-Film Production; short film [51]
1918 Tavasz A Télben "Spring in Winter" Yes Phönix-Film Production [51]
1918 A Csúnya Fiú "The Ugly Boy" Yes Phönix-Film Production [51]
1918 Egy Krajcár Története "The Story Of A Kreutzer" Yes Phönix-Film Production [51]
1918 Az Ezredes "The Colonel" Yes Phönix-Film Production; with Bela Lugosi [55]
1918 Lulu "Lulu" Yes Phönix-Film Production; with Bela Lugosi [55]
1918 99 "99" Yes Phönix-Film Production; with Victor Varconi and Bela Lugosi [55]
1918 Az Ördög "The Devil" Yes Phönix-Film Production; with Victor Varconi; from a story by Ferenc Molnár [56]
1918 A Skorpió I "The Scorpion, Part I" Yes Phönix-Film Production; with Victor Varconi [56]
1918 A Skorpió II "The Scorpion, Part II" Yes Phönix-Film Production; with Victor Varconi; a three-minute excerpt survives [56]
1918 Júdás "The Judas" Yes Phönix-Film Production; with Leopold Kramer [57]
1918 Gróf Monte Cristo "The Count Of Monte Cristo" Yes Phönix-Film Production; based on the novel by Alexandre Dumas; unfinished film [56]
1918 Ocskay Brigadéros "The Ocksay Brigadier" Yes Phönix-Film Production; with Victor Varconi; based on a story by Ferenc Herczeg; unfinished film [56]
1918 A Napraforgós Hölgy "The Sunflower Woman" Yes Phönix-Film Production; with Lucy Doraine; unfinished film [56]
1918 Varázskeringö "Magic Waltz" Yes Yes Semper Films Production; with Victor Varconi; screenplay by Curtiz [56]
1918 Lu, A Kokott "Lu, the Coquette" Yes Yes Semper Films Production; screenplay by Curtiz [56]
1918 A Víg Özvegy "The Merry Widow" Yes Yes Semper Films Production; with Victor Varconi; screenplay by Curtiz; based on the operetta by Franz Lehár [56]
1919 Alraune "Alraune" Yes Phönix-Film Production [56]
1919 Jön az öcsém "My Brother Is Coming" Yes A short film with Oscar Beregi and Lucy Doraine; prints survive [58]
1919 Liliom "Liliom" Yes Based on the play by Ferenc Molnár; unfinished when Curtiz left Budapest for Vienna [59]

Austrian films: 1919–1926

In 1919, a communist government was established for a brief time in Hungary.[31] This prompted Kertész to migrate to Austria where he began working for the Sascha-Film Company. By the end of 1920 he had established himself as the company's top director.[60] As in Hungary, his wife, Lucy Doraine, appeared in several of his Austrian films. They divorced in 1923.[61] Except where noted, the films from this period survive and were made for the Sascha-Film Company.[27]

Austrian films: 1919–1926
Year Title Function Notes Ref
Original English translation Director Other
1919 Die Dame Mit Dem Schwarzen Handschuh "The Lady with the Black Gloves" Yes Yes With Lucy Doraine; screenplay by Curtiz; lost [62]
1919 Boccaccio "Boccaccio" Yes With Paul Lukas; lost [63]
1920 Der Stern Von Damaskus "The Star of Damascus" Yes Yes With Lucy Doraine; screenplay by Curtiz; lost [63]
1920 Die Gottesgeißel "The Scourge of God" Yes Yes With Lucy Doraine; screenplay by Curtiz; sequel to The Star of Damascus; lost [63]
1920 Die Dame Mit Den Sonnenblumen "The Sunflower Lady" Yes Yes With Lucy Doraine; screenplay by Curtiz; lost [64]
1920 Mrs. Tutti Frutti "Mrs. Tutti Frutti" Yes With Lucy Doraine [63]
1920 Cherchez La Femme! "Look For The Woman" Yes With Lucy Doraine [64]
1921 Frau Dorothys Bekenntnis "Madame Dorothy's Confession" Yes With Lucy Doraine [65]
1921 Labyrinth Des Grauen "Labyrinth of Horror" Yes With Lucy Doraine [65]
1921 Drakula halála "The Death of Dracula" Yes Lapa Studios / Corvin Studios; directed Károly Lajthay; David Curtiz (brother of Michael Curtiz) has a supporting role; screenplay by Curtiz; based on the novel by Bram Stoker; lost [49]
1922 Sodom Und Gomorrah "Sodom and Gomorrah" Yes Yes Screenplay by Ladislaus Vajda and Curtiz; with Lucy Doraine, Walter Slezak, and Victor Varconi; an epic film shown in two parts [66]
1922 Samson und Delila "Samson and Delilah" Yes Vita-Film Production; produced by Alexander Korda; with María Corda; Curtiz is credited as costume designer[e] [67]
1923 Der Junge Medardus "Young Medardus" Yes with Victor Varconi; screenplay by Ladislaus Vajda [68]
1923 Die Lawine "Avalanche" Yes With Victor Varconi and Mary Kid; screenplay by Ladislaus Vajda [69]
1923 Namenlos "Nameless" Yes With Victor Varconi and Mary Kid; screenplay by Ladislaus Vajda; a remake of Curtiz's The Charlatan; filmed again by him as Alias the Doctor (1932); lost [69]
1924 Ein Spiel Ums Leben "A Deadly Game" Yes With Mary Kid; lost [70]
1924 General Babka "General Babka" Yes "No information available" [70]
1924 Die Sklavenkönigin "The Slave Queen" Yes A co-production of Sascha-Film (Austria) and Stoll Pictures (England); with María Corda; based on the novel by H. Rider Haggard; released in the United States as Moon of Israel [71]
1925 Das Spielzeug von Paris "Red Heels" Yes Yes With Lili Damita; screenplay by Curtiz; based on a novel by Margery Lawrence; released in the United States as Red Heels [72]
1926 Fiaker Nr. 13 "Cab No. 13" Yes With Lili Damita [73]
1926 Der Goldene Schmetterling "The Golden Butterfly" Yes With Lili Damita and Nils Asther; released in the United States as The Road to Happiness [74]

American films – the Warner Bros. years: 1926–1953

In 1926, Mihály Kertész accepted an offer from Warner Bros. to come to the United States and direct films. He arrived that June and anglicized his name to Michael Curtiz. He would remain at Warners for 28 years. During that time he directed 87 films, married screenwriter Bess Meredyth in 1929, and became an American citizen in 1936.[75] Except where noted all of Curtiz's Warner Bros. films survive.

American films – the Warner Bros. years: 1926–1953
Year Title Function Notes Ref
Director Other
1926 The Third Degree Yes With Dolores Costello and Jason Robards; based on a play by Charles Klein; previously filmed in 1913 and 1919 [76]
1927 A Million Bid Yes With Dolores Costello, Warner Oland, Malcolm McGregor [77]
1927 The Desired Woman Yes With Irene Rich, William Russell, and William Collier Jr.; screenplay by Darryl F. Zanuck; lost film [78]
1927 Good Time Charley Yes With Helene Costello, Warner Oland, and Clyde Cook [79]
1928 Tenderloin Yes With Dolores Costello, Conrad Nagel, George E. Stone; story by "Melville Crossman"; part-talking; lost film [80]
1928 Noah's Ark Yes With Dolores Costello, George O'Brien, Noah Beery, Guinn Williams, and Myrna Loy; screenplay by Darryl F. Zanuck [81]
1929 Glad Rag Doll Yes With Dolores Costello, Ralph Graves, and Audrey Ferris; all-talking film; lost film [82]
1929 Madonna of Avenue A Yes With Dolores Costello, Grant Withers, Douglas Gerrard; part-talking; lost film [83]
1929 The Gamblers Yes With H. B. Warner, Lois Wilson, Jason Robards; lost film [84]
1929 Hearts in Exile Yes With Dolores Costello, Grant Withers, James Kirkwood; all-talkie; an alternate ending was shot for the film's European release; lost film [85]
1930 Mammy Yes With Al Jolson, Lois Moran, Louise Dresser, Lowell Sherman; based on an unproduced play by Irving Berlin and James Gleason; part-Technicolor[f] [87]
1930 Under a Texas Moon Yes With Frank Fay, Raquel Torres, Myrna Loy, Noah Beery; filmed in Technicolor [88]
1930 The Matrimonial Bed Yes With Frank Fay, Lilyan Tashman, James Gleason [89]
1930 Bright Lights Yes With Dorothy Mackaill, Frank Fay, Noah Beery; filmed in Technicolor[g] [91]
1930 River's End Yes With Charles Bickford, Evalyn Knapp, J. Farrell MacDonald; based on a novel by James Oliver Curwood[h] [92]
1930 A Soldier's Plaything Yes Lotti Loder, Harry Langdon, Ben Lyon; filmed in the Vitascope wide-screen process, but released in standard 35mm [93]
1931 Dämon des Meers ["Demon of the Sea"] Yes With Wilhelm Dieterle; a German-language version of Moby Dick, directed by Lloyd Bacon and starring John Barrymore [94]
1931 God's Gift to Women Yes With Frank Fay, Laura La Plante, Joan Blondell [95]
1931 The Mad Genius Yes With John Barrymore, Marian Marsh, Charles Butterworth, Boris Karloff [96]
1932 The Woman from Monte Carlo Yes With Lil Dagover, Walter Huston, Warren William [97]
1932 Alias the Doctor Yes With Richard Barthelmess, Marian Marsh, Norman Foster; previously filmed by Curtiz as The Charlatan (1917) and Nameless (1923)[i] [98]
1932 The Strange Love of Molly Louvain Yes With Ann Dvorak, Lee Tracy, Richard Cromwell [99]
1932 Doctor X Yes With Lionel Atwill, Fay Wray, Lee Tracy; filmed in Technicolor[j] [101]
1932 The Cabin in the Cotton Yes With Richard Barthelmess, Dorothy Jordan, Bette Davis; based on a novel by Harry Harrison Kroll[k] [102]
1932 20,000 Years in Sing Sing Yes With Spencer Tracy, Bette Davis; based on the book by Lewis E. Lawes[l] [103]
1933 Mystery of the Wax Museum Yes With Lionel Atwill, Fay Wray, Glenda Farrell, Frank McHugh; filmed in filmed in Technicolor[m] [104]
1933 The Keyhole Yes With Kay Francis, George Brent, Glenda Farrell [105]
1933 Private Detective 62 Yes With William Powell, Margaret Lindsay, Ruth Donnelly [106]
1933 The Mayor of Hell Yes Directed by Archie Mayo; with James Cagney, Madge Evans, Arthur Byron; Curtiz directed ten hours of retakes on this film [107]
1933 Goodbye Again Yes With Warren William, Joan Blondell, Genevieve Tobin[n] [108]
1933 The Kennel Murder Case Yes With William Powell (as Philo Vance), Mary Astor, Eugene Pallette; based on the novel by S. S. Van Dine [109]
1933 Female Yes With Ruth Chatterton, George Brent, Lois Wilson; originally begun with William Dieterle directing; William A. Wellman took over for awhile when Dieterle became ill, then Curtiz took over when Wellman was assigned to directed College Coach [110]
1934 Mandalay Yes With Kay Francis, Ricardo Cortez, Warner Oland [111]
1934 Jimmy the Gent Yes With James Cagney, Bette Davis, Allen Jenkins [112]
1934 The Key Yes With William Powell, Edna Best, Colin Clive [113]
1934 British Agent Yes With Leslie Howard, Kay Francis, William Gargan; based on a book by R. H. Bruce Lockhart [114]
1935 Black Fury Yes With Paul Muni, Karen Morley, William Gargan; based on a short story by Michael Musmanno [115]
1935 The Case of the Curious Bride Yes With Warren William (as Perry Mason), Margaret Lindsay, Donald Woods, Claire Dodd; based on the novel by Erle Stanley Gardner; Errol Flynn has a small role in this film [116]
1935 Go Into Your Dance Yes Directed by Archie Mayo; with Al Jolson, Ruby Keeler, Glenda Farrell; Curtiz directed six scenes in this film along with some retakes [117]
1935 Front Page Woman Yes With Bette Davis, George Brent, Roscoe Karns; based on a short story by Richard Macaulay [118]
1935 Little Big Shot Yes With Sybil Jason, Glenda Farrell, Robert Armstrong, Edward Everett Horton [119]
1935 Captain Blood Yes With Errol Flynn, Olivia de Havilland, Lionel Atwill, Basil Rathbone, Guy Kibbee; based on the novel Captain Blood: His Odyssey by Rafael Sabatini[o] [120]
1936 The Walking Dead Yes With Boris Karloff, Ricardo Cortez, Edmund Gwenn, Marguerite Churchill [121]
1936 Anthony Adverse Yes Directed by Mervyn LeRoy; with Fredric March, Olivia de Havilland, Donald Woods, Claude Rains, Gale Sondergaard; based on the novel by Hervey Allen; Curtiz directed the opening sequence [122]
1936 The Charge of the Light Brigade Yes With Errol Flynn, Olivia de Havilland, Patric Knowles; based on the poem by Alfred, Lord Tennyson [123]
1937 Black Legion Yes Directed by Archie Mayo; with Humphrey Bogart, Dick Foran, Erin O'Brien-Moore; Curtiz directed some additional scenes two months after principal production had ended [124]
1937 Stolen Holiday Yes With Kay Francis, Claude Rains, Ian Hunter [125]
1937 Marked Woman Yes Directed by Lloyd Bacon; With Bette Davis, Humphrey Bogart, Lola Lane; Curtiz finished this film when LLoyd Bacon went on his honeymoon [126]
1937 Mountain Justice Yes With Josephine Hutchinson, George Brent, Guy Kibbee; loosely based on the true story of Edith Maxwell [127]
1937 Kid Galahad Yes With Edward G. Robinson, Bette Davis, Humphrey Bogart, Wayne Morris, Harry Carey; based on a story by Francis Wallace[p] [128]
1937 The Perfect Specimen Yes With Errol Flynn, Joan Blondell, Hugh Herbert [129]
1938 Gold Is Where You Find It Yes With George Brent, Olivia de Havilland, Claude Rains, Tim Holt; based on a novel by Clements Ripley; filmed in Technicolor [130]
1938 The Adventures of Robin Hood Yes Co-directed with William Keighley; with Errol Flynn, Olivia de Havilland, Basil Rathbone, Claude Rains, Alan Hale, Eugene Pallette, Patric Knowles; Curtiz replaced Keighley as the film's director; filmed in Technicolor[q] [131]
1938 Four's a Crowd Yes With Errol Flynn, Olivia de Havilland, Rosalind Russell, Patric Knowles [132]
1938 Four Daughters Yes With Claude Rains, Jeffrey Lynn, John Garfield; based on a short story by Fannie Hurst[r] [11]
1938 Angels with Dirty Faces Yes With James Cagney, Pat O'Brien, Humphrey Bogart, Ann Sheridan[s] [133]
1939 Blackwell's Island Yes Directed by William McGann; with John Garfield, Rosemary Lane, Dick Purcell; Curtiz directed some retakes and added some scenes [134]
1939 Dodge City Yes With Errol Flynn, Olivia de Havilland, Ann Sheridan; filmed in Technicolor [135]
1939 Sons of Liberty Yes Short film; with Claude Rains, Gale Sondergaard; filmed in Technicolor [136]
1939 Daughters Courageous Yes With John Garfield, Claude Rains, Jeffrey Lynn [137]
1939 The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex Yes With Bette Davis, Errol Flynn, Olivia de Havilland, Donald Crisp, Alan Hale, Vincent Price; based on the play Elizabeth the Queen by Maxwell Anderson; filmed in Technicolor [138]
1939 Four Wives Yes With Priscilla Lane, Rosemary Lane, Lola Lane, Claude Rains; a sequel to Four Daughters [139]
1940 Virginia City Yes With Errol Flynn, Miriam Hopkins, Randolph Scott, Humphrey Bogart, Alan Hale, Guinn "Big Boy" Williams; released in sepia [140]
1940 The Sea Hawk Yes With Errol Flynn, Brenda Marshall, Claude Rains, Henry Daniell, Alan Hale, Flora Robson; released with a sepia sequence [141]
1940 Santa Fe Trail Yes With Errol Flynn, Olivia de Havilland, Raymond Massey, Ronald Reagan, Alan Hale, Guinn "Big Boy" Williams; released in sepia [142]
1941 The Sea Wolf Yes With Edward G. Robinson, Ida Lupino, John Garfield, Alexander Knox, Barry Fitzgerald; based on the novel by Jack London [143]
1941 Dive Bomber Yes With Errol Flynn, Fred MacMurray, Ralph Bellamy, Alexis Smith; filmed in Technicolor [144]
1942 Captains of the Clouds Yes With James Cagney, Dennis Morgan, Brenda Marshall, Alan Hale; filmed in Technicolor on location in Canada [145]
1942 Yankee Doodle Dandy Yes With James Cagney (as George M. Cohan), Joan Leslie, Walter Huston [22][146]
1942 Casablanca Yes With Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman, Paul Henreid, Claude Rains, Conrad Veidt, Sydney Greenstreet, Peter Lorre, S. Z. Sakall, Dooley Wilson; based on the unproduced play Everybody Comes to Rick's by Murray Burnett and Joan Alison [147]
1943 Mission to Moscow Yes With Walter Huston, Ann Harding, Oscar Homolka; based on the book by Joseph E. Davies [148]
1943 This Is the Army Yes With George Murphy, Joan Leslie, Ronald Reagan; songs by Irving Berlin; filmed in Technicolor [149]
1944 Passage to Marseille Yes With Humphrey Bogart, Claude Rains, Michèle Morgan, Philip Dorn, Sydney Greenstreet, Peter Lorre; based on the novel Men Without Country by Charles Nordhoff and James Norman Hall [150]
1944 Janie Yes With Robert Hutton, Edward Arnold, Ann Harding, Joyce Reynolds; based on the play by Josephine Bentham and Herschel V. Williams, Jr.[t] [152]
1945 Roughly Speaking Yes Yes With Rosalind Russell, Jack Carson, Robert Hutton, Alan Hale; Curtiz has a one-line bit part in the film[u] [154]
1945 Mildred Pierce Yes With Joan Crawford, Jack Carson, Zachary Scott, Ann Blyth, Eve Arden; based on the novel by James M. Cain [155]
1946 Night and Day Yes With Cary Grant (as Cole Porter), Alexis Smith, Monty Woolley; filmed in Technicolor [156]
1947 Life with Father Yes With William Powell, Irene Dunne, Elizabeth Taylor, Edmund Gwenn, Jimmy Lydon, ZaSu Pitts; based on the play by Howard Lindsay and Russel Crouse; filmed in Technicolor[v] [157]
1947 The Unsuspected Yes Yes A Michael Curtiz Production; with Joan Caulfield, Claude Rains, Audrey Totter, Constance Bennett, Hurd Hatfield; based on a story by Charlotte Armstrong [15]
1948 Romance on the High Seas Yes Yes A Michael Curtiz Production; with Jack Carson, Janis Paige, Don DeFore, Doris Day, Oscar Levant, S. Z. Sakall; filmed in Technicolor; Doris Day's film debut [16]
1949 My Dream Is Yours Yes Yes A Michael Curtiz Production; with Jack Carson, Doris Day, Lee Bowman; features a cartoon sequence with Bugs Bunny and Tweety; filmed in Technicolor [158]
1949 Flamingo Road Yes Yes A Michael Curtiz Production; with Joan Crawford, Zachary Scott, Sydney Greenstreet; based on the play by Sally and Robert Wilder[w] [159]
1949 The Lady Takes a Sailor Yes With Jane Wyman, Dennis Morgan, Eve Arden [160]
1949 It's a Great Feeling Yes Directed by David Butler; with Dennis Morgan, Doris Day, Jack Carson; Curtiz makes a cameo appearance as himself; filmed in Technicolor [161]
1950 Young Man with a Horn Yes With Kirk Douglas, Lauren Bacall, Doris Day, Hoagy Carmichael, Juano Hernandez; loosely based on the life of Bix Beiderbecke [162]
1950 Bright Leaf Yes With Gary Cooper, Lauren Bacall, Patricia Neal; based on a novel by Foster Fitzsimmons [163]
1950 The Breaking Point Yes With John Garfield, Patricia Neal, Phyllis Thaxter, Juano Hernandez; based on the novel To Have and Have Not by Ernest Hemingway[x] [18]
1951 Force of Arms Yes With William Holden, Nancy Olson, Frank Lovejoy [164]
1951 Jim Thorpe – All-American Yes With Burt Lancaster (as Jim Thorpe), Charles Bickford, Steve Cochran, Phyllis Thaxter [165]
1951 I'll See You in My Dreams Yes With Doris Day, Danny Thomas (as Gus Kahn), Frank Lovejoy, Patrice Wymore [166]
1952 She's Working Her Way Through College Yes Directed by H. Bruce Humberstone; with Virginia Mayo, Ronald Reagan, Gene Nelson; Curtiz took over direction while Humberstone recovered from the flu; filmed in Technicolor [167]
1952 The Story of Will Rogers Yes With Will Rogers Jr. (as his father), Jane Wyman, Carl Benton Reid; filmed in Technicolor [168]
1952 The Jazz Singer Yes With Danny Thomas, Peggy Lee, Mildred Dunnock; based on the play by Samson Raphaelson; filmed in Technicolor[y] [170]
1953 Trouble Along the Way Yes With John Wayne, Donna Reed, Charles Coburn [171]
1954 The Boy from Oklahoma Yes With Will Rogers Jr., Nancy Olson, Lon Chaney Jr.; filmed in WarnerColor [172]

American films – the final years: 1954–1961

In 1954, Curtiz left Warner Bros. and spend the remaining years of his career working for various studios, notably Paramount and 20th Century-Fox.[173] In 1961, during production of his final film, The Comancheros, Curtiz learned that he was suffering from incurable cancer. He died the following year.[174]

American films – the final years: 1954–1961
Year Title Function Notes Ref
Director Other
1954 White Christmas Yes Paramount Pictures; with Bing Crosby, Danny Kaye, Rosemary Clooney, Vera-Ellen, Dean Jagger; the most financially successful film of Curtiz's career; filmed in VistaVision (the first film to use this process) and Technicolor [175]
1954 The Egyptian Yes 20th Century-Fox; with Jean Simmons, Victor Mature, Gene Tierney, Peter Ustinov, Edmund Purdom; based on the novel by Mika Waltari; filmed in CinemaScope and DeLuxe Color [176]
1955 We're No Angels Yes Paramount Pictures; with Humphrey Bogart, Aldo Ray, Peter Ustinov, Joan Bennett, Basil Rathbone; based on a play by Albert Husson; filmed in VistaVision and Technicolor [177]
1956 The Scarlet Hour Yes Paramount Pictures; with Carol Ohmart, Tom Tryon, Jody Lawrance; filmed in VistaVision [178]
1956 The Vagabond King Yes Paramount Pictures; with Kathryn Grayson, Oreste, Rita Moreno; filmed in VistaVision and Technicolor[z] [179]
1956 The Best Things in Life Are Free Yes 20th Century-Fox; with Gordon MacRae (as Buddy DeSylva), Dan Dailey (as Ray Henderson), Ernest Borgnine (as Lew Brown); filmed in CinemaScope and DeLuxe Color [180]
1957 The Helen Morgan Story Yes Warner Bros.; with Ann Blyth, Paul Newman, Richard Carlson; filmed in CinemaScope [181]
1958 The Proud Rebel Yes Formosa Productions; distributed by Buena Vista; with Alan Ladd, Olivia de Havilland, Dean Jagger, David Ladd; filmed in Technicolor[aa] [182]
1958 King Creole Yes Paramount Pictures; with Elvis Presley, Carolyn Jones, Walter Matthau, Dean Jagger, Dolores Hart, Vic Morrow; based on the novel A Stone for Danny Fisher by Harold Robbins [183]
1959 The Man in the Net Yes The Mirisch Company; released by United Artists; with Alan Ladd, Carolyn Jones, Diane Brewster; based on the novel by Patrick Quentin [184]
1959 The Hangman Yes Paramount Pictures; with Robert Taylor, Tina Louise, Fess Parker; based on the short story "Pull Your Freight" by Luke Short [185]
1960 A Breath of Scandal Yes Paramount Pictures; with Sophia Loren, Maurice Chevalier, John Gavin, Angela Lansbury; based on the play Olympia by Ferenc Molnár; filmed in Technicolor [186]
1960 The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Yes Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer; with Tony Randall, Patty McCormack, Neville Brand, Andy Devine, Buster Keaton, Eddie Hodges (as Huckleberry Finn); based on the novel by Mark Twain; filmed in CinemaScope and Metrocolor [187]
1961 Francis of Assisi Yes 20th Century-Fox; with Bradford Dillman (as Francis of Assisi), Dolores Hart, Stuart Whitman; based on the book The Joyful Beggar by Louis de Wohl; filmed in CinemaScope and DeLuxe Color [188]
1961 The Comancheros Yes 20th Century-Fox; with John Wayne, Stuart Whitman, Ina Balin, Lee Marvin; based on a novel by Paul Wellman; John Wayne took over direction for a while when Curtiz was ill; filmed in CinemaScope and DeLuxe Color [20]

Awards and honors

Academy Awards

Listed below are all the films directed by Michael Curtiz that received Academy Award nominations for Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Supporting Actor, or Best Supporting Actress.

Academy Awards
Year Category Nominee Film Result Notes Ref
1935
(8th)
Best Picture Hal B. Wallis, Harry Joe Brown, and Gordon Hollingshead for Warner Bros. and Cosmopolitan Captain Blood Nominated Mutiny on the Bounty won [189]
Best Director Michael Curtiz[ab] Nominated John Ford won for The Informer
1938
(11th)
Best Picture Hal B. Wallis and Henry Blanke for Warner Bros. The Adventures of Robin Hood Nominated You Can't Take It with You won [190]
Best Director Michael Curtiz Angels with Dirty Faces Nominated Frank Capra won for You Can't Take It with You
Michael Curtiz Four Daughters Nominated
Best Actor James Cagney (as Rocky Sullivan) Angels with Dirty Faces Nominated Spencer Tracy won for Boys Town
Best Supporting Actor John Garfield (as Mickey Borden) Four Daughters Nominated Walter Brennan won for Kentucky
1939
(12th)
Best Short Film (two reels) Warner Bros. Sons of Liberty Won [191]
1942
(15th)
Best Picture Jack L. Warner, Hal B. Wallis, and William Cagney for Warner Bros. Yankee Doodle Dandy Nominated Mrs. Miniver won [192]
Best Director Michael Curtiz Nominated William Wyler won for Mrs. Miniver
Best Actor James Cagney (as George M. Cohan) Won
1943
(16th)
Best Picture HalB. Wallis for Warner Bros. Casablanca Won [193]
Best Director Michael Curtiz Won
Best Actor Humphrey Bogart (as Rick Blane) Nominated Paul Lukas won for Watch on the Rhine
1945
(18th)
Best Picture Jerry Wald for Warner Bros. Mildred Pierce Nominated The Lost Weekend won [194]
Best Actress Joan Crawford (as Mildred Pierce) Won
Best Supporting Actress Eve Arden Nominated Anne Revere won for National Velvet
Best Supporting Actress Ann Blyth Nominated
1947
(20th)
Best Actor William Powell (as Clarence Day) Life with Father Nominated Ronald Colman won for A Double Life [195]

National Film Registry

As of 2020, four films directed by Michael Curtiz have been added to the National Film Registry.[23]

National Film Registry
Title Year Ref
Released Inducted
The Adventures of Robin Hood 1938 1995 [23]
Yankee Doodle Dandy 1942 1993
Casablanca 1942 1989
Mildred Pierce 1945 1996

AFI's 100 Years...100 Movies

In 1998, the American Film Institute presented their list of the 100 Greatest American films. They revised the list in 2007. Two films directed by Michael Curtiz were included on the list both times.

AFI's 100 Years...100 Movies
Year Rank Film Ref
1998 2 Casablanca (1942) [196]
100 Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942)
2007 3 Casablanca (1942) [197]
98 Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942)

References

Notes

  1. ^ Paramount Pictures bought the rights to Moon of Israel and held up its American release until 1927. Jack and Harry Warner were able to unearth a print of the film and, after seeing it, offered Curtiz a contract.[10]
  2. ^ a b c A sketch film was a short film that was presented as part of a live stage performance.[28]
  3. ^ The Undesirable has been released on blu-ray by Olive Films.[40]
  4. ^ The Last Dawn has been preserved by the EYE Film Institute Netherlands.[52]
  5. ^ Actually, Curtiz loaned the costumes from Sodom and Gomorrah to this production.[67]
  6. ^ The Technicolor footage survives incomplete.[86]
  7. ^ Bright Lights survives complete in black and white prints. Only fragments of the Technicolor footage survive.[90]
  8. ^ Previously filmed in 1920; remade in 1940[92]
  9. ^ A French-language version of Alias the Doctor, titled Le Cas de Docteur Brenner ["The Case of Dr. Brenner"], was also produced in 1932.[98]
  10. ^ A black and white version was also filmed.[100]
  11. ^ This is the film where Bette Davis says, "I'd love to kiss ya, but I just washed my hair".[102]
  12. ^ Remade as Castle on the Hudson in 1940 and directed by Anatole Litvak[103]
  13. ^ Remade in 3D as House of Wax (1953), directed by Andre DeToth[104]
  14. ^ Remade as Honeymoon for Three, directed by Lloyd Bacon[108]
  15. ^ Previously filmed in 1923, directed by David Smith.[120]
  16. ^ Remade as Kid Galahad (1962), starring Elvis Presley; The Wagons Roll at Night, starring Humphrey Bogart, was also based on the Wallace story.[128]
  17. ^ Numerous films have been made about Robin Hood, among them in 1922, 1952, 1976, and 1991.[131]
  18. ^ Remade as Young at Heart with Doris Day and Frank Sinatra[11]
  19. ^ Warner Bros. produced a sequel, Angels Wash Their Faces (1939).[133]
  20. ^ Warner Bros. produced a sequel to this film, Janie Gets Married starring Joan Leslie and directed by Vincent Sherman.[151]
  21. ^ Curtiz did this as a last minute fill-in for Hungarian actor Lazlo Bartos, who had become ill.[153]
  22. ^ Life with Father was later adapted into a television series.
  23. ^ Remade as a TV movie in 1980 and a television series in 1981–1982[159]
  24. ^ Hemingway's novel also served as the inspiration for To Have and Have Not (1945) and The Gun Runners (1958).[18]
  25. ^ Previously filmed in 1927 and remade in 1980[169]
  26. ^ Previously filmed in 1930[179]
  27. ^ Contemporary press notices state that this film was shot in wide-screen. However, contemporary reviews indicate that it was released in standard format.[182]
  28. ^ Curtiz's nomination was a write-in and not an official one.[189]

Footnotes

  1. ^ Rode 2017, p. xv
  2. ^ Rode 2017, p. xvii
  3. ^ Rode 2017, p. xvi
  4. ^ a b Rode 2017, pp. 2, 8
  5. ^ Robertson 1994, p. 5
  6. ^ a b Rode 2017, p. 11 / Kinnard & Vitone 1986, p. 109
  7. ^ Robertson 1994, p. 6
  8. ^ Rode 2017, p. 40
  9. ^ Robertson 1994, p. 8
  10. ^ Rode 2017, pp. 59, 64
  11. ^ a b c "Four Daughters". AFI. Archived from the original on 13 January 2021. Retrieved 6 January 2021.
  12. ^ Robertson 1994, pp. 36–60
  13. ^ Kinnard & Vitone 1986, pp. 73–81, 88
  14. ^ Kinnard & Vitone 1986, pp. 81–86
  15. ^ a b "The Unsuspected". AFI. Archived from the original on 8 June 2019. Retrieved 6 January 2021.
  16. ^ a b "Romance on the High Seas". AFI. Archived from the original on 13 January 2021. Retrieved 6 January 2021.
  17. ^ Robertson 1994, p. 115
  18. ^ a b c "The Breaking Point". AFI. Archived from the original on 13 January 2021. Retrieved 6 January 2021.
  19. ^ Rode 2017, pp. 482–487
  20. ^ a b "The Comancheros". Archived from the original on 12 January 2021. Retrieved 6 January 2021.
  21. ^ "Hollywood Star Walk: Michael Curtiz". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on 27 November 2020. Retrieved 1 January 2021.
  22. ^ a b "America's Greatest Movies (1998)". American Film Institute (AFI). Archived from the original on 22 April 2020. Retrieved 1 January 2021. / "America's Greatest Movies (2007)". AFI. Archived from the original on 26 May 2019. Retrieved 1 January 2021.
  23. ^ a b c "National Film Preservation Board: Personnel Credits". Library of Congress. Archived from the original on 5 November 2018. Retrieved 1 January 2021.
  24. ^ Rode 2017, pp. 553–575
  25. ^ Rode 2017, pp. 5, 10
  26. ^ Rode 2017, pp. 10–11
  27. ^ a b c Fidalgo, Miguel A. "Michael Curtiz European Filmography" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 1 October 2011. Retrieved 10 January 2021.
  28. ^ a b c d e Rode 2017, p. 11
  29. ^ Rode 2017, pp. 12–14
  30. ^ Rode 2017, p. 13 / "Atlantis". Silent Era. Archived from the original on 1 July 2016. Retrieved 1 January 2021.
  31. ^ a b c Robertson 1994, p. 6
  32. ^ Rode 2017, p. 23
  33. ^ a b c Rode 2017, p. 29
  34. ^ Rode 2017, p. 15
  35. ^ Rode 2017, p. 553
  36. ^ Rode 2017, p. 15
  37. ^ Rode 2017, p. 554
  38. ^ a b Rode 2017, p. 16
  39. ^ Rode 2017, p. 18
  40. ^ "The Undesirable". Silent Era. Archived from the original on 13 January 2021. Retrieved 2 January 2021.
  41. ^ Rode 2017, p. 20
  42. ^ Rode 2017, p. 22
  43. ^ a b Rode 2017, p. 574
  44. ^ a b Rode 2017, p. 25
  45. ^ a b c Rode 2017, p. 554
  46. ^ a b Rode 2017, pp. 26–27
  47. ^ Rode 2017, pp. 28, 555
  48. ^ a b Rode 2017, p. 28
  49. ^ a b Rode 2017, p. 575
  50. ^ a b c d Rode 2017, p. 555
  51. ^ a b c d e f Rode 2017, p. 556
  52. ^ "The Last Dawn / A Million Bid". UCLA Film & Television Library. 12 January 2018. Archived from the original on 13 January 2021. Retrieved 2 January 2021.
  53. ^ Rode 2017, pp. 29–30, 556
  54. ^ Rode 2017, p. 31
  55. ^ a b c Rode 2017, p. 33
  56. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Rode 2017, p. 557
  57. ^ Rode 2017, pp. 34, 557
  58. ^ Rode 2017, pp. 557–558
  59. ^ Rode 2017, p. 558
  60. ^ Robertson 1994, p. 7
  61. ^ Rode 2017, p. 54
  62. ^ Rode 2017, p. 40
  63. ^ a b c d Rode 2017, p. 41
  64. ^ a b Rode 2017, p. 558
  65. ^ a b Rode 2017, p. 43
  66. ^ Rode 2017, pp. 44–53
  67. ^ a b Rode 2017, pp. 44–45
  68. ^ Rode 2017, pp. 51–52, 559
  69. ^ a b Rode 2017, p. 55
  70. ^ a b Rode 2017, p. 559
  71. ^ Rode 2017, pp. 56–59
  72. ^ Rode 2017, p. 60 / Kinnard & Vitone 1986, p. 112
  73. ^ Rode 2017, pp. 62–63
  74. ^ Rode 2017, p. 68 / Kinnard & Vitone 1986, p. 112
  75. ^ Rode 2017, pp. 84, 200
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Bibliography

  • Kinnard, Roy; Vitone, R. J. (1986). The American Films of Michael Curtiz. Metuchen, NJ, USA: Scarecrow Press. ISBN 978-0810818835.
  • Layton, James; Pierce, David (2015). The Dawn of Technicolor: 1915–1935. Rochester, NY: George Eastman House. ISBN 978-0935398281.
  • Robertson, James C. (1994). The Casablanca Man: The Cinema of Michael Curtiz. New York, NY, USA; London, UK: Routledge. ISBN 978-0415115773.
  • Rode, Alan K. (2017). Michael Curtiz: A Life on Film. Lexington, KY, USA: University Press of Kentucky. ISBN 978-0813173917.

External links

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