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Menora Mivtachim Arena

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Menora Mivtachim Arena
Yad Eliyahu Arena Tel Aviv - panoramio.jpg
Menora Mivtachim Arena's exterior.
Former names Sports Palace at Yad Eliyahu (1963–2003)
Nokia Arena (2003–2014)
Location 51 Yigal Alon Street
Tel Aviv, Israel
Coordinates 32°3′39.41″N 34°47′28.80″E / 32.0609472°N 34.7913333°E / 32.0609472; 34.7913333
Owner Tel Aviv Municipality
Operator Sport Palaces Limited
Capacity Tennis: 10,383
(permanent seating)[1]
Basketball: 11,060[2]
Construction
Opened 17 September 1963
Renovated 1972, 2005, 2008
Expanded 1972, 2005, 2008
Tenants
Maccabi Tel Aviv
Israeli national basketball team

Menora Mivtachim Arena (Hebrew: היכל מנורה מבטחים‎) is a large multi-purpose sports indoor arena that is located in southern Tel Aviv, Israel. The arena is primarily used to host tennis matches, basketball games, and concerts. It is one of the major sporting facilities in the Greater Tel Aviv Area. The arena is owned by the municipality of Tel Aviv, and is managed by Sports Palaces Ltd., a company also fully owned by the municipality (which also manages Bloomfield Stadium). On January 1, 2015, the arena changed its name to Menora Mivtachim Arena (Hebrew: היכל מנורה מבטחים‎).

The arena is home to the Maccabi Tel Aviv basketball club, a member of the Maccabi Tel Aviv sports club. It has hosted the Israeli Super League final four, the Israeli State Cup final four, and most of the senior Israeli national basketball team's home games. It also hosted the 1994 FIBA European League Final Four and the 2004 Euroleague Final Four. In other sports, it has also hosted a 1989 Davis Cup World Group match, between Israel and France, and the 2009 Davis Cup quarterfinals between Israel and Russia, in July 2009.

History

The arena was opened on 17 September 1963, with a game between the national basketball teams of Israel and Yugoslavia, in which the latter won, by a score of 69–64.

In its early years, the arena held a capacity of 5,000 spectators, with just concrete stands, without any seats, and without a roof. In 1972, a second floor of tiers was built, increasing the capacity to 10,000 spectators. The concrete stands were covered by seats, and the arena was covered with a roof. Further renovations through the years 2006–2008 modernized the arena further, added commercial facilities, and increased its capacity to 10,383 with permanent seating for tennis matches and 11,060 for basketball games.[3]

The arena hosted the FIBA EuroStars all-star game in 1997, the FIBA European Champions Cup (now called EuroLeague) Finals game of the 1971–72 season, and the EuroLeague Final Four in 1994 and 2004. The arena was also used to host one of the group stages of EuroBasket 2017.

Entertainment

The arena has hosted various musical acts, such as: Teen Angels, Lali, Scorpions, Paul Anka, Rod Stewart, Neil Sedaka, Oasis, Cyndi Lauper, LMFAO, Westlife, Five, Philipp Kirkorov, Natalia Oreiro, Alicia Keys, Charles Aznavour, Sean Paul, and Julio and Enrique Iglesias.

The Mamma Mia! international tour played 24 shows at the venue as well. The arena also hosted shows of the international tour Alegría, of Cirque du Soleil. On December 19 and 20, 2015, the arena hosted comedian, Jerry Seinfeld, in his first live performance in Israel. All four shows of the comedian were sold out.

See also

References

External links

Events and tenants
Preceded by
Sporthal Arena
Antwerp
FIBA European Champions Cup
Final Venue

1972
Succeeded by
Country Hall du Sart Tilman
Liège
Preceded by
Peace and Friendship Stadium
Athens
FIBA European League
Final Four
Venue

1994
Succeeded by
Pabellón Príncipe Felipe
Zaragoza
Preceded by
Abdi İpekçi Arena
Istanbul
FIBA EuroStars All-Star Game
Venue

1997
Succeeded by
Max Schmeling Halle
Berlin
Preceded by
Palau Sant Jordi
Barcelona
EuroLeague
Final Four
Venue

2004
Succeeded by
Olimpiisky Arena
Moscow
This page was last edited on 18 February 2018, at 09:34.
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