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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Max Marcin
Born
Max Schlamjack

(1879-05-05)5 May 1879
Died(1948-03-30)30 March 1948 (aged 68)
Tucson, Arizona, United States
OccupationScreenwriter
Years active1916-1949
Poster for  Obey the Law
Poster for Obey the Law

Max Marcin (5 May 1879 – 30 March 1948) was a Polish-born American playwright, novelist, screenwriter, and film director. He wrote for 47 films between 1916 and 1949. He also directed six films between 1931 and 1936. His stage work includes See My Lawyer (1915), directed by Frank M. Stammers; he wrote and/or produced almost 20 plays for Broadway from 1916-38.[1] Marcin wrote for and produced The FBI in Peace and War[2] and created, produced and wrote for the Crime Doctor radio program, which became the basis for a series of ten Crime Doctor films.[3]

He was born in Krotoschen, Posen, Germany (now Poznań, Poland). At the age of seven, Max emigrated to the United States with his father and mother, Hirsch and Johanna Schlamjack, and two siblings, Julius and Emma. They were steerage passengers on the S/S Taormina, which sailed from the Port of Hamburg on 14 July 1886[4] and arrived at the Port of New York on 2 August 1886.[5] They settled in New York City, where his father continued working as a butcher. Max Schlamjack was admitted to City College as a student in 1895. He began his career as a newspaper reporter in 1898 and, with the passing years, devoted himself to more creative literary work, primarily as a writer of plays and short stories. He died in Tucson, Arizona, aged 68. He was survived by a brother and a sister.[2][6]

Selected plays

Selected short stories

  • "The Return of Esther" (New York Tribune, Sunday, 11 April 1909)[9]
  • "Call of the Schutzenfest" (The Buffalo Courier, Sunday, 5 May 1909)
  • "Better Than Rube" (New York Tribune, November 1911)[10]
  • "The Spy" (New York Tribune, 1 September 1912)[11]

Novels

  • Are You My Wife? (1910) (311 pp., illus.; New York: Moffat, Yard & Co.)[12]
  • The Substitute Prisoner (1911) (New York: Moffat, Yard & Co.)[13]

Selected filmography

References

  1. ^ "Max Marcin". Internet Broadway Database. Archived from the original on 20 August 2014. Retrieved 20 January 2015.
  2. ^ a b "Max Marcin" (PDF). Broadcasting. 5 April 1948. Retrieved 22 November 2014.
  3. ^ Wilt, David (1991). Hardboiled in Hollywood. Bowling Green State University Popular Press. ISBN 0-87972-525-7. P. 77.
  4. ^ Hamburg Passenger Lists, https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv=1&dbid=1068&h=3145770&tid=&pid=&usePUB=true&_phsrc=mTE4766&_phstart=successSource
  5. ^ New York Passenger and Crew Lists , 1820-1957, https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv=1&dbid=7488&h=10101474&tid=&pid=&usePUB=true&_phsrc=mTE4765&_phstart=successSource
  6. ^ (1 April 1948). Max Marcin Dead; Wrote Mysteries, The New York Times
  7. ^ a b "Klaw & Erlanger Take Cohan Houses", The New York Times, 4 July 1913, page seven.
  8. ^ "'See My Lawyer' Opens at the Collingwood", Poughkeepsie Eagle-News, 2 September 1915, page six.
  9. ^ Marcin, Max. "The Return of Esther", New York Tribune, 11 April 1909, page 30.
  10. ^ Advertisement for next Sunday's New York Tribune, New York Tribune, 13 November 1911, page ten.
  11. ^ Marcin, Max. "The Spy", New York Tribune, 1 September 1912, page 29.
  12. ^ [https://www.newspapers.com/clip/50616024/new-york-tribune/ "Matrimonial Mystery: Are You My Wife?" (review), New York Tribune, 10 December 1910, page nine.
  13. ^ Advertisement, The New York Times, 22 October 1911.

External links

This page was last edited on 7 August 2020, at 09:25
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