To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

Matthias I, Duke of Lorraine

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Matthias
Matthias I, Duke of Lorraine.png
+ MATEUS DUX ET MARCHIO LOTARINGORUM
Duke of Lorraine
Reign1138 - 1176
PredecessorSimon I, Duke of Lorraine
SuccessorSimon II, Duke of Lorraine
Born1119
Died13 May 1176
Burial
Clairlieu abbey, Villers-lès-Nancy
SpouseBertha Hohenstaufen
IssueSimon II, Duke of Lorraine
Frederick I, Duke of Lorraine
Judith
Alice
Theoderic
Matthias
HouseHouse of Lorraine
FatherSimon I, Duke of Lorraine
MotherAdelaide of Leuven

Matthias I (1119 – 13 May 1176) was the duke of Lorraine from 1138 to his death as the eldest son and successor of Simon I and Adelaide.[1] Like his forefathers going back to Theodoric II and even to Adalbert, he was a stern supporter of the king of Germany and Holy Roman Emperor. He married Bertha (sometimes called Judith), daughter of Frederick II, Duke of Swabia, and therefore niece of the Hohenstaufen king Conrad III and sister of Frederick Barbarossa, future emperor.[1]

He accompanied Barbarossa on a number of important occasions, including his imperial coronation by Pope Adrian IV in Rome, 1155.[1] He assisted the emperor in his wars against Adrian and his successor Alexander III and the kings of France and Sicily. He extended his own ducal demesne at the expense of the bishop of Toul, but was an important donor to the Church and founder of abbeys. He died in 1176 and was interred in his abbey of Clairlieu in Villers-lès-Nancy.[2] By his Hohenstaufen marriage (1138), he had:

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c Bogdan 2005, p. 36.
  2. ^ a b Bogdan 2005, p. 37.
  3. ^ Bouchard 1987, p. 278.

Sources

  • Bogdan, Henry (2005). La Lorraine des ducs (in French). Perrin.
  • Bouchard, Constance Brittain (1987). Sword, Miter, and Cloister: Nobility and the Church in Burgundy, 980-1198. Cornell University Press.
Preceded by
Simon I
Duke of Lorraine
1138–1176
Succeeded by
Simon II
This page was last edited on 1 April 2021, at 20:37
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.