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Massachusetts's 8th congressional district

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Massachusetts's 8th congressional district
Massachusetts US Congressional District 8 (since 2013).tif
Massachusetts's 8th congressional district since January 3, 2013
Representative
  Stephen Lynch
DBoston
Population (2015)764,789[1]
Median income$90,323[2]
Ethnicity
Cook PVID+10[3]

Massachusetts's 8th congressional district is located in eastern Massachusetts, including part of Boston. It is represented by Democrat Stephen Lynch. For one congressional term (1791–1793) it served as the home district of the District of Maine. The district boundaries were significantly changed as of the elections of 2012 due to redistricting after the 2010 census, with the old 8th district largely being shifted to the new 7th district.[4] The new 8th district comprises many of the communities of the old 9th district, as well as some easternmost Norfolk County communities and northernmost Plymouth County communities of the old 10th district.

This district has the distinction of being the only one ever represented by someone who had previously served as president of the United States, as John Quincy Adams held this office from 1843 until his death in 1848.

Election results from presidential races

Year Result
2004 John Kerry 79 - 19%
2008 Barack Obama 58 - 40.5%
2012 Barack Obama 57.8 - 40.8%
2016 Hillary Clinton 60.4 - 34.4%

Cities and towns in the District

In Bristol County: Precincts 1 and 2 in Raynham.

In Norfolk County: Avon, Braintree, Canton, Cohasset, Dedham, Holbrook, Milton:Precincts 2–4, and 6–9, Norwood, Quincy, Randolph, Stoughton, Walpole, Westwood and Weymouth.

In Plymouth County: Abington, Bridgewater, Brockton, East Bridgewater, Hingham, Hull, Scituate, West Bridgewater, and Whitman.

In Suffolk County: Boston, Ward 3: Precincts 1–6; Ward 5: Precincts 3–5, 11; Ward 6, Ward 7: Precincts 1–9, Ward 11: Precincts 9 and 10, Ward 13: Precincts 3, 7 and 10, Ward 16: Precincts 2, 5, 7, 9, 10 and 12, Ward 19: Precincts 1–6, 8 and 9, and Ward 20: Precincts 1, 2, and 4–20.

List of members representing the district

Representative Party Years Cong
ress
Electoral history District location
Jonathan Grout Anti-Administration March 4, 1789 –
March 3, 1791
1st Elected in 1788.
Redistricted to the 7th district and lost re-election.
1789 – 1793
Worcester County
George Thatcher.jpg

George Thatcher
Pro-Administration March 4, 1791 –
March 3, 1793
2nd Redistricted from the 6th district and re-elected in 1790.
Redistricted to the 4th district.
District eliminated March 4, 1793 –
March 3, 1795
Fisher Ames - Project Gutenberg eText 15391.jpg

Fisher Ames
Federalist March 4, 1795 –
March 3, 1797
4th Redistricted from the 1st district and re-elected in 1794.
Retired.
1795 – 1803
"1st Middle district"
Harrisongrayotis.jpg

Harrison Gray Otis
Federalist March 4, 1797 –
March 3, 1801
5th
6th
Elected in 1796.
Re-elected in 1798.
Retired.
William Eustis.jpg

William Eustis
Democratic-Republican March 4, 1801 –
March 3, 1803
7th Elected in 1800.
Redistricted to the 1st district.
Lemuel Williams Federalist March 4, 1803 –
March 3, 1805
8th Redistricted from the 5th district and re-elected in 1802.
Lost re-election.
1803 – 1815
"Barnstable district"
Isaiah L. Green Democratic-Republican March 4, 1805 –
March 3, 1809
9th
10th
Elected in 1804.
Re-elected in 1806.
Retired.
Gideon Gardner Democratic-Republican March 4, 1809 –
March 3, 1811
11th Elected in 1808.
Retired.
Isaiah L. Green Democratic-Republican March 4, 1811 –
March 3, 1813
12th Elected in 1810.
Lost re-election.
John Reed Jr. Federalist March 4, 1813 –
March 3, 1815
13th Elected in 1812.
Redistricted to the 9th district.
William Baylies Federalist March 4, 1815 –
March 3, 1817
14th Redistricted from the 7th district and re-elected in 1814.
Retired.
1815 – 1823
"Plymouth district"
Zabdiel Sampson Democratic-Republican March 4, 1817 –
July 26, 1820
15th
16th
Elected in 1817 on the second ballot.
Resigned to become collector of customs in Plymouth.
Vacant July 26, 1820 –
November 24, 1820
Aaron Hobart Democratic-Republican November 24, 1820 –
March 3, 1823
16th
17th
Elected in 1820.
Later elected on the second ballot to finish Sampson's term and seated December 18, 1820.
Redistricted to the 11th district.
Samuel Lathrop Adams-Clay Federalist March 4, 1823 –
March 3, 1825
18th
19th
Redistricted from the 5th district and re-elected in 1822.
Re-elected in 1825 on the third ballot.
[data unknown/missing]
1823 – 1833
"Hampden district"
Anti-Jacksonian March 4, 1825 –
March 3, 1827
IsaacBates.jpg

Isaac C. Bates
Anti-Jacksonian March 4, 1827 –
March 3, 1835
20th
21st
22nd
23rd
[data unknown/missing]
1833 – 1843
[data unknown/missing]
William Barron Calhoun.png

William B. Calhoun
Anti-Jacksonian March 4, 1835 –
March 3, 1837
24th
25th
26th
27th
[data unknown/missing]
Retired.
Whig March 4, 1837 –
March 3, 1843
John Quincy Adams by GPA Healy, 1858.jpg

John Quincy Adams
Whig March 4, 1843 –
February 23, 1848
28th
29th
30th
Redistricted from the 12th district and re-elected in 1842.
Died.
1843 – 1853
"All the towns in Norfolk County; Abington, North Bridgewater, Hingham, and Hull, in the County of Plymouth; and Brighton, Holliston, Natick, Newton, and Sherburne, in the County of Middlesex."[5]
Vacant February 24, 1848 –
April 2, 1848
Horace Mann - Daguerreotype by Southworth & Hawes, c1850.jpg

Horace Mann
Whig April 3, 1848 –
March 3, 1853
30th
31st
32nd
[data unknown/missing]
Tappan Wentworth (Massachusetts Congressman).jpg

Tappan Wentworth
Whig March 4, 1853 –
March 3, 1855
33rd [data unknown/missing] 1853 – 1863
"The city of Lowell, and the towns of Acton, Ashby, Ashland, Bedford, Billerica, Boxborough, Carlisle, Chelmsford, Concord, Dracut, Dunstable, Framingham, Groton, Hopkinton, Lincoln, Littleton, Marlborough, Natick, Pepperell, Shirley, Stow, Sudbury, Tewksbury, Townsend, Tyngsborough, Wayland. Westford, and Weston, in the county of Middlesex; and the towns of Berlin, Bolton, Harvard, Lunenburg, Northborough, Southborough, and Westborough, in the county of Worcester."[6]
Chauncey L. Knapp.jpg

Chauncey L. Knapp
Know Nothing March 4, 1855 –
March 3, 1857
34th
35th
[data unknown/missing]
Republican March 4, 1857 –
March 3, 1859
CRTrain.jpg

Charles R. Train[7]
Republican March 4, 1859 –
March 3, 1863
36th
37th
[data unknown/missing]
JohnDBaldwindrawing.jpg

John D. Baldwin
Republican March 4, 1863 –
March 3, 1869
38th
39th
40th
[data unknown/missing] 1863 – 1873
[data unknown/missing]
George Frisbie Hoar - Brady-Handy.jpg

George F. Hoar[8]
Republican March 4, 1869 –
March 3, 1873
41st
42nd
[data unknown/missing]
Redistricted to the 9th district.
John M. S. Williams Republican March 4, 1873 –
March 3, 1875
43rd [data unknown/missing] 1873 – 1883
"Ashland, Wards 22, 23, 25, Boston, Brookline, Cambridge, Dedham, Dover, Framingham, Franklin, Holliston, Hopkinton, Medfield, Medway, Milford, Natick, Needham, Newton, Norwood, Sherborn, Southboro', Watertown, Wayland, and Weston."[9]
William Wirt Warren (Massachusetts Congressman).jpg

William W. Warren
Democratic March 4, 1875 –
March 3, 1877
44th [data unknown/missing]
Lost re-election.
William Claflin - Brady-Handy.jpg

William Claflin[10]
Republican March 4, 1877 –
March 3, 1881
45th
46th
[data unknown/missing]
Retired.
John Wilson Candler.png

John W. Candler
Republican March 4, 1881 –
March 3, 1883
47th [data unknown/missing]
WilliamARussell.jpg

William A. Russell
Republican March 4, 1883 –
March 3, 1885
48th Redistricted from the 7th district and re-elected in 1882.
[data unknown/missing]
1883 – 1893
1891 District 8 detail of Massachusetts Congressional Districts map BPL 11063.png
Charles Herbert Allen, 1898.jpg

Charles H. Allen
Republican March 4, 1885 –
March 3, 1889
49th
50th
[data unknown/missing]
Retired.
Frederick T. Greenhalge.jpg

Frederic T. Greenhalge
Republican March 4, 1889 –
March 3, 1891
51st [data unknown/missing]
Lost re-election.
Moses T. Stevens.png

Moses T. Stevens
Democratic March 4, 1891 –
March 3, 1893
52nd [data unknown/missing]
Redistricted to the 5th district.
SamuelMcCall.jpg

Samuel W. McCall[11][12]
Republican March 4, 1893 –
March 3, 1913
53rd
54th
55th
56th
57th
58th
59th
60th
61st
62nd
[data unknown/missing] 1893 – 1903
Arlington, Boston (Wards 9, 10, 11), Cambridge, Medford, Somerville, Winchester.[13]
1903 – 1913
Arlington, Belmont, Cambridge, Medford, Somerville, Winchester, Woburn.[14]
Frederick Simpson Deitrick (Massachusetts Congressman).jpg

Frederick Simpson Deitrick
Democratic March 4, 1913 –
March 3, 1915
63rd [data unknown/missing] 1913 – 1933
Middlesex County: Arlington, Belmont, Cambridge, Lexington, Medford, Melrose, Stoneham, Wakefield, Watertown, Winchester.[15][16]
Frederick W Dallinger.jpg

Frederick W. Dallinger
Republican March 4, 1915 –
March 3, 1925
64th
65th
66th
67th
68th
[data unknown/missing]
Harry I. Thayer (Massachusetts Congressman).jpg

Harry I. Thayer
Republican March 4, 1925 –
March 10, 1926
69th Elected in 1924.
Died.
Vacant March 10, 1926 –
November 2, 1926
Frederick W Dallinger.jpg

Frederick W. Dallinger
Republican November 2, 1926 –
October 1, 1932
69th
70th
71st
72nd
Elected to finish Thayer's term and elected to the next term.
Re-elected in 1928.
Re-elected in 1930.
Resigned to become judge of United States Customs Court.
Vacant October 1, 1932 –
March 3, 1933
Arthur D. Healey[17] Democratic March 4, 1933 –
August 3, 1942
73rd
74th
75th
76th
77th
Elected in 1932.
Re-elected in 1934.
Re-elected in 1936.
Re-elected in 1938.
Re-elected in 1940.
Resigned to become judge of US District Court for Massachusetts.
1933 – 1943
Cambridge (Wards 2, 3), Everett, Malden, Medford, Somerville.[14]
Vacant August 3, 1942 –
January 3, 1943
Angier Goodwin Republican January 3, 1943 –
January 3, 1955
78th
79th
80th
81st
82nd
83rd
Elected in 1942.
Re-elected in 1944.
Re-elected in 1946.
Re-elected in 1948.
Re-elected in 1950.
Re-elected in 1952.
Lost re-election.
1943 – 1953
Everett, Lynnfield, Malden, Medford, Melrose, N. Reading, Reading, Saugus, Somerville (Wards 4, 5, 6, 7), Stoneham, Wakefield.[14][18]
1953 – 1963
[data unknown/missing]
Torbert Macdonald.jpg

Torbert H. Macdonald
Democratic January 3, 1955 –
January 3, 1963
84th
85th
86th
87th
Elected in 1954.
Re-elected in 1956.
Re-elected in 1958.
Re-elected in 1960.
Redistricted to 7th district.
SpeakerO'Neill.jpg

Tip O'Neill[19]
Democratic January 3, 1963 –
January 3, 1987
88th
89th
90th
91st
92nd
93rd
94th
95th
96th
97th
98th
99th
Redistricted from the 11th district and re-elected in 1962.
Re-elected in 1964.
Re-elected in 1966.
Re-elected in 1968.
Re-elected in 1970.
Re-elected in 1972.
Re-elected in 1974.
Re-elected in 1976.
Re-elected in 1978.
Re-elected in 1980.
Re-elected in 1982.
Re-elected in 1984.
Retired.
1963 – 1973
Boston (Wards 1, 2, 3, 21, 22), Brookline, Cambridge, Somerville.[14][20]
1973 – 1983
Arlington, Belmont, Boston (Wards 1, 2, 5, 21, 22), Cambridge, Somerville, Watertown.[14][21]
1983 – 1993
Arlington, Belmont, Boston (Wards 1, 2, 4, 5, 21, 22), Cambridge, Somerville, Waltham, Watertown.[14][22]
Joe Kennedy II.jpg

Joe Kennedy II[23]
Democratic January 3, 1987 –
January 3, 1999
100th
101st
102nd
103rd
104th
105th
Elected in 1986.
Re-elected in 1988.
Re-elected in 1990.
Re-elected in 1992.
Re-elected in 1994.
Re-elected in 1996.
Retired.
1993 – 2003
Belmont, Boston (Wards 1, 2, 4, 5, 9, 10, 11, 12, 14, 15, 17, 18, 21, 22), Cambridge, Chelsea, Somerville, Watertown.[14]
Mike Capuano.jpg

Mike Capuano
Democratic January 3, 1999 –
January 3, 2013
106th
107th
108th
109th
110th
111th
112th
Elected in 1998.
Re-elected in 2000.
Re-elected in 2002.
Re-elected in 2004.
Re-elected in 2006.
Re-elected in 2008.
Re-elected in 2010.
Redistricted to the 7th district.
2003 – 2013
MA-08 congressional district.gif

In Middlesex County: Cambridge, and Somerville. In Suffolk County: Boston, Wards 1, 2, Ward 3, Precincts 1–4, 7, 8, Ward 4, Ward 5, Precincts 1, 2, 6–10, Ward 7, Precinct 10, Wards 8–12, Ward 13, Precincts 1, 2, 4–6, Ward 14, Ward 15, Precincts 1–5, 7–9, Ward 16, Precincts 1, 3, Ward 17, Precincts 1–3, 5–12; Ward 18, Precincts 1–8, 13–15, 21, Ward 19, Precincts 1, 3–6, 8, 9, Wards 21 and 22, (the remainder of Boston is in the 9th district), and Chelsea.
Stephen F. Lynch, 2008 cropped.jpg

Stephen Lynch
Democratic January 3, 2013 –
Present
113th
114th
115th
116th
Redistricted from the 9th district and re-elected in 2012.
Re-elected in 2014.
Re-elected in 2016.
Re-elected in 2018.
2013 – Present
Massachusetts US Congressional District 8 (since 2013).tif
In Bristol County: Precincts 1 and 2 in Raynham.

In Norfolk County: Avon, Braintree, Canton, Cohasset, Dedham, Holbrook, Milton:Precincts 2–4, and 6–9, Norwood, Quincy, Randolph, Stoughton, Walpole, Westwood and Weymouth.

In Plymouth County: Abington, Bridgewater, Brockton, East Bridgewater, Hingham, Hull, Scituate, West Bridgewater, and Whitman.

In Suffolk County: Boston, Ward 3: Precincts 1–6; Ward 5: Precincts 3–5, 11; Ward 6, Ward 7: Precincts 1–9, Ward 11: Precincts 9 and 10, Ward 13: Precincts 3, 7 and 10, Ward 16: Precincts 2, 5, 7, 9, 10 and 12, Ward 19: Precincts 1–6, 8 and 9, and Ward 20: Precincts 1, 2, and 4–20.

Recent election results

2006 general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Mike Capuano 125,167 91
Socialist Workers Laura Garza 12,390 9
Majority 112,777 82
Turnout 137,557
Democratic hold Swing

References

  1. ^ "2015 American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates".
  2. ^ https://www.census.gov/mycd/?st=25&cd=08
  3. ^ "Partisan Voting Index – Districts of the 115th Congress" (PDF). The Cook Political Report. April 7, 2017. Retrieved April 7, 2017.
  4. ^ http://www.sec.state.ma.us/spr/sprcat/catpdf2010/cong2010/CongressionalDistrict_2011State.pdf Access date: March 20, 2012.
  5. ^ John Hayward (1849). "Congressional Districts". Gazetteer of Massachusetts. Boston: J.P. Jewett & Co.
  6. ^ "Congressional Districts". Massachusetts Register 1862. Boston: Adams, Sampson, & Co.
  7. ^ "Massachusetts". Congressional Directory for the Second Session of the Thirty-Seventh Congress. Washington DC: House of Representatives. 1861.
  8. ^ Ben. Perley Poore (1869). "Massachusetts". Congressional Directory for the First Session of the Forty-First Congress (2nd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office.
  9. ^ "Congressional Districts of Massachusetts". Massachusetts Register and Business Directory, 1878. Boston: Sampson, Davenport, and Co.
  10. ^ Ben. Perley Poore (1878). "Massachusetts". Congressional Directory: 45th Congress (3rd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office.
  11. ^ L.A. Coolidge (1897). "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: Fifty-Fifth Congress. Washington DC: Government Printing Office.
  12. ^ A.J. Halford (1909). "Massachusetts". Congressional Directory: 60th Congress (2nd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office.
  13. ^ Francis M. Cox (1893). "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: Fifty-Third Congress (2nd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office.
  14. ^ a b c d e f g "Geographical History of the 7th District". U.S. Congressman Michael E. Capuano. Washington DC: U.S. House of Representatives. Retrieved November 23, 2013. (Includes geographical history of Massachusetts's 8th congressional district, pre-2013)
  15. ^ "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: 64th Congress (2nd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 1916.
  16. ^ Commonwealth of Massachusetts (1921), "Population of Congressional Districts", Population of Massachusetts as determined by the fourteenth census of the United States 1920, Boston: Wright & Potter
  17. ^ "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: 75th Congress (2nd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 1938.
  18. ^ Commonwealth of Massachusetts (1941), "Population of Congressional Districts", Population of Massachusetts as determined by the sixteenth census of the United States, 1940, Boston: Wright & Potter, OCLC 10056477, House No. 2849
  19. ^ "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: 90th Congress. Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 1968.
  20. ^ "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: 88th Congress. Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 1963.
  21. ^ "Massachusetts", 1977 Official Congressional Directory: 95th Congress, Washington DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1977
  22. ^ "Massachusetts". 1985–1986 Official Congressional Directory: 99th Congress. Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 1985.
  23. ^ "Massachusetts". 1991–1992 Official Congressional Directory: 102nd Congress. Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 1991.

External links

Maps

Election results

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Oklahoma's 3rd congressional district
Home district of the Speaker of the House
January 4, 1977 – January 3, 1987
Succeeded by
Texas's 12th congressional district

This page was last edited on 20 May 2020, at 14:05
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