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Massachusetts's 4th congressional district

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Massachusetts's 4th congressional district
Massachusetts US Congressional District 4 (since 2013).tif
Massachusetts's 4th congressional district – since January 3, 2013.
Representative
  Joseph P. Kennedy III
DNewton
Median income$100,742[1]
Cook PVID+9[2]

Massachusetts's 4th congressional district is located mostly in southern Massachusetts. It is represented by Democrat Joe Kennedy III.

The district covers much of the area included in the 10th district before the 1982 redistricting. In prior years, the district stretched from Brookline to Fitchburg. The shape of the district underwent some changes effective from the elections of 2012, after Massachusetts congressional redistricting to reflect the 2010 census.[3] Most of Plymouth County and the South Coast are included in the new 9th district. The new 4th district has expanded westward to include towns along the Rhode Island border that had been in the old 3rd district.

For a very brief time (1793–95) it represented part of the District of Maine.

Recent election results from presidential races

Year Office Result
2000 President Gore 65 - 29%
2004 President Kerry 65 - 33%
2008 President Obama 60.4 - 38%
2012 President Obama 57.2 - 41.3%
2016 President Clinton 59.2 - 35%

Cities and towns in the district

In Bristol County:

Attleboro, Berkley, Dighton, Easton, Fall River: Ward 4, Precinct C; Ward 5, Precinct B1 and C; Ward 6, Precinct C1; and Wards 7, 8, and 9, Freetown, Mansfield, North Attleborough, Norton, Raynham: Precincts 1A, 2A, 3, and 4, Rehoboth, Seekonk, Somerset, Swansea, and Taunton.

In Middlesex County:

Hopkinton, and Newton.

In Norfolk County:

Bellingham: Precincts 1, 2, 3, and 4, Brookline, Dover, Foxborough, Franklin, Medfield, Medway, Millis, Needham, Norfolk, Plainville, Sharon, Wellesley, and Wrentham.

In Plymouth County:

Lakeville.

In Worcester County:

Hopedale, and Milford.

Cities and towns in the district prior to 2013

1840s

"The towns of Acton, Ashby, Bedford, Boxborough, Burlington, Cambridge, Charlestown, Concord, Framingham, Hopkinton, Lexington, Lincoln, Marlborough, Pepperell, Shirley, Somerville, Stow, Sudbury, Townsend, Waltham, Watertown, Wayland, West Cambridge, Weston and Woburn, in the County of Middlesex, and the towns of Berlin, Bolton, Boylston, Fitchburg, Harvard, Lancaster, Leominster, Lunenburg, Northboro', Shrewsbury, Southborough, Sterling, and Westborough, in the County of Worcester."[4]

1850s

"The city of Roxbury, and the town of Brookline, in the county of Norfolk; and the wards numbered seven, eight, nine, ten, eleven, and twelve, in the city of Boston, in the county of Suffolk."[5]

1860s

Boston (Wards 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 9), Cambridge, Chelsea.[6]

1870s

Boston (Wards 1, 2, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12), Chelsea, Revere, and Winthrop.[7]

1880s–1900s

1910s

"Worcester County: City of Worcester; towns of Auburn, Blackstone Douglas, Grafton, Hopedale, Mendon, Milford, Millbury, Northbridge, Shrewsbury, Sutton, Upton, Uxbridge, and Westboro. Middlesex County: Town of Hopkinton."[8]

1920s–1930s

1940s

In Middlesex County: Ashland, Framingham, Hopkinton, Sudbury, Waltham, Wayland, Weston. In Worcester County: Auburn, Berlin, Boylston, Grafton, Holden, Northborough, Shrewsbury, Southborough, Sterling, Westborough, West Boylston, Worcester.[9]

1950s–1960s

1970s

"Middlesex County: Cities of Newton and Waltham. Towns of Ayer, Framingham, Lincoln, Maynard, Shirley, Stow, Sudbury, Wayland, and Weston. Norfolk County: Town of Brookline. Worcester County: Cities of Fitchburg, Gardner, and Leominster. Towns of Bolton, Harvard, Lancaster, Lunenburg, and Westminster."[10]

2003 to 2013

The district from 2003 to 2013
The district from 2003 to 2013

In Bristol County:

Acushnet, Berkley, Dartmouth, Dighton, Fairhaven, Fall River: Ward 4, Precinct C; Ward 5, Precinct C; Ward 6, Precinct A; Ward 7; Ward 8, Precincts A-C; Ward 9, Freetown, Mansfield, New Bedford, Norton, Raynham, Taunton, Westport.

In Middlesex County:

Newton, Sherborn.

In Norfolk County:

Brookline, Dover, Foxborough, Millis, Norfolk, Sharon, Wellesley.

In Plymouth County:

Halifax, Lakeville, Marion, Mattapoisett, Middleborough, Rochester, Wareham.


List of members representing the district

Member District home Party Years Cong
ress
Electoral history District location
TheodoreSedgwick.jpg

Theodore Sedgwick
Stockbridge Pro-Administration March 4, 1789 –
March 3, 1793
1st
2nd
Elected in 1789.
Re-elected in 1790.
Redistricted to the 2nd district.
Berkshire County
Gilbert Stuart - Major-General Henry Dearborn - 1913.793 - Art Institute of Chicago.jpg

Henry Dearborn
Gardiner, Maine Anti-Administration March 4, 1793 –
March 3, 1795
(General ticket)
3rd Elected in 1793. on the second ballot]] as part of a three-seat general ticket, representing the district from Lincoln, Hancock, and Washington Counties.
Redistricted to the 12th district.
District of Maine
PelegWadsworth.png

Peleg Wadsworth
Portland, Maine Pro-Administration Elected in 1793. on the third ballot]] as part of a three-seat general ticket, representing the district from Cumberland County.
Redistricted to the 13th district.
George Thatcher.jpg

George Thatcher
Biddeford, Maine Pro-Administration Redistricted from the 8th district and re-elected in 1792 as part of a three-seat general ticket, representing the district from York County.
Redistricted to the 14th district.
DFoster.jpg

Dwight Foster
Brookfield Federalist March 4, 1795 –
June 6, 1800
4th
5th
6th
Redistricted from the 2nd district and re-elected in 1794.
Re-elected in 1796.
Re-elected in 1798.
Resigned when elected U.S. Senator.
"4th Western district"
Vacant June 6, 1800 –
December 15, 1800
6th
Levi Lincoln Sr. by William Sullivan.jpg

Levi Lincoln Sr.
Worcester Democratic-Republican December 15, 1800 –
March 5, 1801
6th
7th
Elected in 1800.
Later elected to finish Foster's term.
Resigned to become U.S. Attorney General.
Vacant March 5, 1801 –
August 24, 1801
7th
Seth Hastings.jpg

Seth Hastings
Mendon Federalist August 24, 1801 –
March 3, 1803
Elected to finish Lincoln's term
Seated January 11, 1802.[11]
Redistricted to the 10th district.
JosephBradleyVarnum.jpg

Joseph Bradley Varnum
Dracut Democratic-Republican March 4, 1803 –
June 29, 1811
8th
9th
10th
11th
12th
Redistricted from the 9th district and re-elected in 1802.
Re-elected in 1804.
Re-elected in 1804.
Re-elected in 1806.
Re-elected in 1808.
Re-elected in 1810.
Resigned on election to U.S. Senate.
"Middlesex district"
Vacant June 29, 1811 –
November 4, 1811
12th
WilliamMRichardson.jpg

William M. Richardson
Groton Democratic-Republican November 4, 1811 –
April 18, 1814
12th
13th
Elected to finish Varnum's term.
Re-elected in 1812.
Resigned to become U.S. Attorney.
Vacant April 18, 1814 –
September 22, 1814
13th
Samuel Dana Groton Democratic-Republican September 22, 1814 –
March 3, 1815
Elected May 23, 1814 to finish Richardson's term.
(Seated September 22, 1814.[12])
Lost re-election.
Asahel Stearns (Massachusetts Congressman).jpg

Asahel Stearns
Charlestown Federalist March 4, 1815 –
March 3, 1817
14th Elected in 1814.
Lost re-election.
Timothy Fuller.jpg

Timothy Fuller
Cambridgeport Democratic-Republican March 4, 1817 –
March 3, 1823
15th
16th
17th
18th
Elected in 1816.
Re-elected in 1818.
Re-elected in 1820.
Re-elected in 1822.
[data unknown/missing]
Adams-Clay Democratic-Republican March 4, 1823 –
March 3, 1825
1823–1833
"Middlesex district"
Edward Everett daguerreotype.png

Edward Everett
[data unknown/missing] Anti-Jacksonian March 4, 1825 –
March 3, 1835
19th
20th
21st
22nd
23rd
Elected in 1824.
Retired.
Samuel Hoar (Massachusetts Congressman).jpg

Samuel Hoar
Concord Anti-Jacksonian March 4, 1835 –
March 3, 1837
24th Elected in 1834.
Lost re-election.
William Parmenter (Massachusetts Congressman).jpg

William Parmenter
Cambridge Democratic March 4, 1837 –
March 3, 1845
25th
26th
27th
28th
Elected in 1836.
[data unknown/missing]
Benjamin Thompson Charlestown Whig March 4, 1845 –
March 3, 1847
29th Elected in 1844.
Retired.
John Gorham Palfrey.jpg

John G. Palfrey
Cambridge Whig March 4, 1847 –
March 3, 1849
30th Elected in 1846.
Lost re-election.
Vacant March 4, 1849 –
March 3, 1851
31st No candidate received the needed majority of votes in twelve runnings of the 1848 election.
Benjamin Thompson Charlestown Whig March 4, 1851 –
September 24, 1852
32nd Elected in 1850.
Died.
Vacant September 25, 1852 –
December 12, 1852
Lorenzo Sabine Framingham Whig December 13, 1852 –
March 3, 1853
Elected to finish Thompson's term.
Retired.
Samuel H. Walley [data unknown/missing] Whig March 4, 1853 –
March 3, 1855
33rd Elected in 1852.
Lost re-election.
Linus B. Comins, Massachusetts Congressman.jpg

Linus B. Comins
Roxbury Know Nothing March 4, 1855 –
March 3, 1857
34th
35th
Elected in 1854.
[data unknown/missing]
Republican March 4, 1857 –
March 3, 1859
AHRice.jpg

Alexander H. Rice[13]
Boston Republican March 4, 1859 –
March 3, 1863
36th
37th
Elected in 1860.
Redistricted to the 3rd district.
Samuel Hooper from Mass.gif

Samuel Hooper[6]
[data unknown/missing] Republican March 4, 1863 –
February 14, 1875
38th
39th
40th
41st
42nd
43rd
Redistricted from the 5th district.
Retired, but died before retirement.
Vacant February 15, 1875 –
March 3, 1875
43rd
Rufus S. Frost.png

Rufus S. Frost
Chelsea Republican March 4, 1875 –
July 28, 1876
44th Elected in 1874.
Election challenged by successor.
Josiah Gardner Abbott - Brady-Handy.jpg

Josiah G. Abbott
[data unknown/missing] Democratic July 28, 1876 –
March 3, 1877
44th Successfully challenged predecessor.
Lost re-election.
Leopold Morse.png

Leopold Morse[14][15]
Boston Democratic March 4, 1877 –
March 3, 1883
45th
46th
47th
Elected in 1876.
Redistricted to the 5th district.
Mayor PA Collins.png

Patrick A. Collins
Boston Democratic March 4, 1883 –
March 3, 1889
48th
49th
50th
Elected in 1882.
Retired.
Joseph Henry O'Neil.png

Joseph H. O'Neil
Boston Democratic March 4, 1889 –
March 3, 1893
51st
52nd
Elected in 1888.
Redistricted to the 9th district.
Lewis Dewart Apsley.png

Lewis D. Apsley
Hudson Republican March 4, 1893 –
March 3, 1897
53rd
54th
Elected in 1892.
Retired.
Congressman George Warren Weymouth.jpg

George W. Weymouth[16]
Fitchburg Republican March 4, 1897 –
March 3, 1901
55th
56th
Elected in 1896.
Retired.
Charles Q. Tirrell Massachusetts Congressman circa 1908.png

Charles Q. Tirrell[17]
Natick Republican March 4, 1901 –
July 31, 1910
57th
58th
59th
60th
61st
Elected in 1900.
Died.
Vacant August 1, 1910 –
November 7, 1910
61st
John J. Mitchell (Massachusetts Congressman).jpg

John Joseph Mitchell
Marlborough Democratic November 8, 1910 –
March 3, 1911
Elected to finish Tirrell's term.
Lost re-election.
William Wilder Massachusetts Congressman circa 1912.png

William H. Wilder
Gardner Republican March 4, 1911 –
March 3, 1913
62nd Elected in 1910.
Redistricted to the 3rd district.
Samuel Ellsworth Winslow.png

Samuel Winslow
Worcester Republican March 4, 1913 –
March 3, 1925
63rd
64th
65th
66th
67th
68th
Elected in 1912.
Retired.
GeorgeRStobbs.jpg

George R. Stobbs
Worcester Republican March 4, 1925 –
March 3, 1931
69th
70th
71st
Elected in 1924.
Retired.
Pehr G. Holmes Worcester Mayor.png

Pehr G. Holmes[18]
Worcester Republican March 4, 1931 –
January 3, 1947
72nd
73rd
74th
75th
76th
77th
78th
79th
Elected in 1930.
Lost re-election.
Harold Donohue image.jpg

Harold Donohue[19]
Worcester Democratic January 3, 1947 –
January 3, 1973
80th
81st
82nd
83rd
84th
85th
86th
87th
88th
89th
90th
91st
92nd
Elected in 1946.
Redistricted to the 3rd district.
Robert Drinan.jpg

Robert Drinan
Newton Democratic January 3, 1973 –
January 3, 1981
93rd
94th
95th
96th
Redistricted from the 3rd district.
Retired after Pope John Paul II ordered all priests to withdraw from electoral politics.
Barneyfrank.jpg

Barney Frank[20]
Newton Democratic January 3, 1981 –
January 3, 2013
97th
98th
99th
100th
101st
102nd
103rd
104th
105th
106th
107th
108th
109th
110th
111th
112th
Elected in 1980.
Retired in 2012.
Joe Kennedy III, 115th official photo (cropped).jpg

Joseph P. Kennedy III
Brookline Democratic January 3, 2013 –
Present
113th
114th
115th
116th
Elected in 2012.
Incumbent

Recent election results

2002

U.S. House election, 2002: Massachusetts, District 4
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Barney Frank 166,125 98.99 +24.09
Write-in 1,691 1.01 +0.96
Turnout 167,816 100 -

2004

U.S. House election, 2004: Massachusetts, District 4
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Barney Frank 219,260 77.74 −21.25
Independent Chuck Morse 62,293 22.09 +22.09
Write-in 486 0.17 −0.84
Turnout 282,039 100 -

2006

U.S. House election, 2006: Massachusetts, District 4
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Barney Frank 176,513 98.48 +20.74
Write-in 2,730 1.52 +1.35
Turnout 179,243 100 -

2008

U.S. House election, 2008: Massachusetts, District 4
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Barney Frank 203,032 64.3 −34.18
Republican Earl Henry Sholley 75,571 23.9 +23.9
Independent Susan Allen 19,848 6.29 +6.29
Write-in 337 0.11 −1.41
Blank/Scattering 16,946 5.37 +5.37
Turnout 315,734 100 -

2010

U.S. House election, 2010: Massachusetts, District 4
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Barney Frank 126,194 53.9 −10.4
Republican Sean Bielat 101,517 43.4 +19.5
Independent Susan Allen 3,445 1.5 −4.79
Independent Donald Jordan 2,873 1.2 +1.2
Turnout 234,029 100 -

2012

U.S. House election, 2012: Massachusetts, District 4
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Joseph P. Kennedy III 219,499 61.1 +7.2
Republican Sean Bielat 129,243 36.0 −7.4
Independent David Rosa 10,674 2.9 +0.2
Turnout 356,416 100 -

2014

Massachusetts's 4th Congressional District, 2014[21]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Joe Kennedy III 184,158 97.91
No party All Others 3,940 2.09
Total votes 188,098 100
Democratic hold

2016

U.S. House election, 2016: Massachusetts, District 4
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Joe Kennedy III 265,823 70.1 +9
Republican David Rosa 113,055 29.8 −6.2
Write-in 335 0.1
Turnout 379,213 100 -

2018

U.S. House election, 2018: Massachusetts, District 4
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Joe Kennedy III (incumbent) 245,289 97.7
n/a Write-ins 5,727 2.3
Total votes 251,016 100.0
Democratic hold

References

  1. ^ https://www.census.gov/mycd/?st=25&cd=04
  2. ^ "Partisan Voting Index – Districts of the 115th Congress" (PDF). The Cook Political Report. April 7, 2017. Retrieved April 7, 2017.
  3. ^ http://www.sec.state.ma.us/spr/sprcat/catpdf2010/cong2010/CongressionalDistrict_2011State.pdf Access date: March 28, 2012.
  4. ^ "State Apportionment; districts of the Commonwealth for the choice of one representative to Congress in each district". Massachusetts Register .. for 1843. Boston: Loring.
  5. ^ "Congressional Districts". Massachusetts Register 1862. Boston: Adams, Sampson, & Co.
  6. ^ a b Ben. Perley Poore (1869). "Massachusetts". Congressional Directory for the First Session of the Forty-First Congress (2nd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office.
  7. ^ "Congressional Districts of Massachusetts". Massachusetts Register and Business Directory, 1878. Boston: Sampson, Davenport, and Co.
  8. ^ "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: 64th Congress (2nd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 1916.
  9. ^ Commonwealth of Massachusetts (1941), "Population of Congressional Districts", Population of Massachusetts as determined by the sixteenth census of the United States, 1940, Boston: Wright & Potter, OCLC 10056477, House No. 2849
  10. ^ "Massachusetts", 1977 Official Congressional Directory: 95th Congress, Washington DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1977
  11. ^ House official membership roster for the 7th Congress Archived December 6, 2014, at the Wayback Machine (footnote 18)
  12. ^ 13th Congress membership roster Archived December 13, 2012, at the Wayback Machine
  13. ^ "Massachusetts". Congressional Directory for the Second Session of the Thirty-Seventh Congress. Washington DC: House of Representatives. 1861.
  14. ^ Ben. Perley Poore (1878). "Massachusetts". Congressional Directory: 45th Congress (3rd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office.
  15. ^ Ben. Perley Poore (1882). "Massachusetts". Congressional Directory: 47th Congress (3rd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office.
  16. ^ L.A. Coolidge (1897). "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: Fifty-Fifth Congress. Washington DC: Government Printing Office.
  17. ^ A.J. Halford (1909). "Massachusetts". Congressional Directory: 60th Congress (2nd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office.
  18. ^ "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: 75th Congress (2nd ed.). Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 1938.
  19. ^ "Massachusetts". Official Congressional Directory: 90th Congress. Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 1968.
  20. ^ "Massachusetts". 1991-1992 Official Congressional Directory: 102nd Congress. Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 1991.
  21. ^ "Massachusetts Secretary of State Election Results 2014" (PDF). Massachusetts Secretary of State. November 4, 2014. Retrieved December 26, 2014.

External links

Maps

Election results

This page was last edited on 7 July 2020, at 19:11
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