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Maryland Public Television

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Maryland Public Television
Maryland Public Television (logo).png
Statewide Maryland
United States
BrandingMPT
SloganTV Worth Watching
ChannelsDigital: See below
Virtual: See below
Affiliations.1: PBS
.2: PBS Encore/Create
.3: PBS Kids
.4: NHK World
OwnerMaryland Public Broadcasting Commission
First air dateOctober 5, 1969 (50 years ago) (1969-10-05)
Call letters' meaningSee below
Former affiliationsWMPB:
NET (1969–1970)
Transmitter powerSee below
HeightSee below
Facility IDSee below
Transmitter coordinatesSee below
WebsiteOfficial website

Maryland Public Television (MPT) is the Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) member state network for the U.S. state of Maryland. It operates under the auspices of the Maryland Public Broadcasting Commission, an agency of the Maryland state government that holds the licenses for all PBS member stations licensed in the state. It benefits from the support of an affiliated non-profit organization, the MPT Foundation, Inc. (formerly known as the Maryland Public Broadcasting Foundation, Inc.). Studios are located in the unincorporated community of Owings Mills in northwestern Baltimore County.

MPT operates six full-power transmitters that cover nearly all of the state, plus Washington, D.C. and parts of Virginia, West Virginia, Delaware, and Pennsylvania. Its local and regional television credits include several state-focused programs on civic and public affairs, as well as a variety of original performance, documentary, and entertainment offerings for the citizens of Maryland. Beyond broadcasting, MPT creates instructional videos, develops training, and builds Internet sites that serve tens of thousands of students, teachers, and child-care providers annually. The centerpiece of MPT's service to Maryland educators, students, and families is Thinkport, a Web site that offers online teaching resources, professional development opportunities and digital technology tools to assist educators.

Maryland Public Television has earned awards ranging from television Emmys for its quality productions to government citations for its volunteerism and educational accomplishments. MPT has been led by Larry Unger, president and chief executive officer, since 2011.

YouTube Encyclopedic

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  • ✪ Maryland Public Television (2012) *HD*
  • ✪ Annenberg Media / Maryland Public Television (2004)

Transcription

Contents

History

WMPB (licensed to Baltimore) first signed on in 1969 as the first station of the Maryland Center for Public Broadcasting; it gained satellite stations in Salisbury, Hagerstown, and Annapolis between 1971 and 1975, resulting in a formation of a statewide public television network. The network adopted its current name in 1984. Maryland Instructional Television (Maryland ITV), a division of the State Department of Education, was also housed at the network until 1991. On July 4, 1987, WFPT (licensed to Frederick) signed on as a third PBS member station for the Washington market, while WGPT in Oakland signed on as the MPT station for extreme western portions of Maryland (which is part of the Pittsburgh television market); prior to the latter station's launch, PBS programming was only available over the air via WNPB-TV.

About 1999, the network launched an afternoon Britcom programming block, Afternoon Tea, replacing children's programming. By 2009, MPT was airing kids' programming during the day on its MPT Select channel.[1]

In September 2015, as part of budget cuts, MPT outsourced its master control operations to Public Media Management—a joint venture of Boston PBS member WGBH and Sony Corporation.[2]

Productions

Inside MPT's Studio A during the taping of Chesapeake Collectibles in June 2010
Inside MPT's Studio A during the taping of Chesapeake Collectibles in June 2010

Current regional productions

  • MPT Salutes Vietnam Veterans:[3] Maryland Public Television salutes the men and women who served in the Vietnam era
  • Chesapeake Collectibles:[4] weekly series featuring people and their collectibles
  • Maryland Farm & Harvest:[5] weekly series helping Marylanders learn more about agriculture
  • Chesapeake Bay Week:[6] week long series of programs in April dedicated to the Chesapeake Bay
  • Direct Connection:[7] public affairs call-in show focusing on discussion and analysis of politics and the news
  • Outdoors Maryland:[8] outdoors show highlighting the Mid-Atlantic region's diversity and beauty
  • State Circle:[9] news and analysis program detailing Maryland's General Assembly proceedings
  • Ways to Pay for College:[10] annual special on finding money for higher education
  • Your Money & Business:[11] consumer-oriented business magazine
  • Artworks:[12] regional arts updates and specials highlighting Maryland's culture and history
  • Our Town:[13] a collection of documentaries showcasing different towns across Maryland
On location in Tucson, Arizona shooting Steven Raichlen's Project Smoke at the Marriott Starr Pass Resort in February 2015
On location in Tucson, Arizona shooting Steven Raichlen's Project Smoke at the Marriott Starr Pass Resort in February 2015

Nationally distributed productions

  • Steven Raichlen's Project Smoke & Project Fire (2015–2019) outdoor cooking series with Steven Raichlen.
  • MotorWeek: (1981–present PBS) automotive magazine featuring new automotive technology and model reviews
  • Great Performances: Star-Spangled Spectacular: Music special commemorating 200th Anniversary of FSK's National Anthem
  • F.S. Key and the Song That Built America
  • Planet Forward: A special on energy, climate, and sustainability
  • For Love of Liberty: series telling the story of America's black servicemen
  • Music of Ireland: Welcome Home
  • National Geographic Bee
  • Veterans Day: A Musical Tribute
  • Space Racers: an animated children's television series about space and science
  • My Greek Table with Dianne Kochilas: a cooking show focused on Greek cuisine hosted by Diane Kochilas
  • To Dine For with Kate Sullivan: features stories of creators and dreamers at their favorite restaurant Kate Sullivan

Regional documentaries and specials

  • Eatin' Oysters: Chesapeake Style! (2017) who's eating & shucking oysters, why they love them, and where to find the best.
  • Search for the USS Scorpion: (2017) Could it be that we have finally found the lost flagship of Commodore Barney’s Flotilla?
  • Conowingo Dam: Power on the Susquehanna (2016) the dam's unique story and place in Maryland history
  • Eatin' Crabcakes: The Best I Ever Had: (2011) the ultimate crab cake treasure hunt
  • Potomac by Air: (2015) explores incredible natural and man-made history along our nation's river
  • Eatin' Crabs Chesapeake Style: (2008) a rollicking foray into the world of the blue crab, from dockside to table.
  • Distinctive Homes of the Chesapeake: (2013) opening the door to Maryland's unique, historic and magnificent homes surrounding the Chesapeake Bay
  • The Chesapeake Bay Bridge: Spanning the Bay (2014) an exciting look back at the monumental creation of the Bay Bridge

Past productions

Stations

Map all coordinates using: OpenStreetMap 
Download coordinates as: KML · GPX

The MPT stations are:

Station City of license1 Channels VC/RF First air date Callsign meaning ERP HAAT Transmitter coordinates Facility ID Public license information
WMPB Baltimore 67 (PSIP)
29 (UHF)
(to move to 22 (UHF))
October 5, 1969 (50 years ago) (1969-10-05) Maryland
Public
Broadcasting
(or Baltimore)
42.6 kW
90 kW (CP)
309 m (1,014 ft)
307 m (1,007 ft) (CP)
39°26′49.9″N 76°46′47.2″W / 39.447194°N 76.779778°W / 39.447194; -76.779778 (WMPB) 65944 Profile
CDBS
WCPB Salisbury 28 (PSIP)
16 (UHF)
March 18, 1971 (48 years ago) (1971-03-18) Coastal
Public
Broadcasting
320 kW 154 m (505 ft) 38°23′9″N 75°35′31″W / 38.38583°N 75.59194°W / 38.38583; -75.59194 (WCPB) 40618 Profile
CDBS
WWPB Hagerstown 31 (PSIP)
44 (UHF)
(to move to 29 (UHF))
October 5, 1974 (45 years ago) (1974-10-05) Western Maryland
Public
Broadcasting
500 kW
700 kW (CP)
369 m (1,211 ft)
375 m (1,230 ft) (CP)
39°39′4″N 77°58′14″W / 39.65111°N 77.97056°W / 39.65111; -77.97056 (WWPB) 65943 Profile
CDBS
WMPT2 Annapolis 22 (PSIP)
21 (UHF)
September 22, 1975 (44 years ago) (1975-09-22) Maryland
Public
Television
1000 kW 284 m (932 ft) 39°0′36.7″N 76°36′31.8″W / 39.010194°N 76.608833°W / 39.010194; -76.608833 (WMPT) 65942 Profile
CDBS
WFPT3 Frederick 62 (PSIP)
28 (UHF)
July 4, 1987 (32 years ago) (1987-07-04) Frederick
Public
Television
71.3 kW 156 m (512 ft) 39°15′38″N 77°18′43.6″W / 39.26056°N 77.312111°W / 39.26056; -77.312111 (WFPT) 40626 Profile
CDBS
WGPT3 Oakland 36 (PSIP)
26 (UHF)
July 4, 1987 (32 years ago) (1987-07-04) Garrett County
Public
Television
200 kW 283 m (928 ft) 39°24′14.3″N 79°17′36.1″W / 39.403972°N 79.293361°W / 39.403972; -79.293361 (WGPT) 40619 Profile
CDBS

Notes:

  • 1. Aside from their transmitters, the MPT stations (except WMPB) do not maintain any physical presence in their cities of license.
  • 2. WMPT used the callsign WAPB (the "A" standing for Annapolis) from its 1975 sign-on to July 4, 1984.
  • 3. WGPT and WFPT were both first licensed in 1979 as translators W36AB and W62AY, respectively. They were later replaced by full-powered licenses from the same transmitter sites.[16][17]

Digital television

Digital channels

The stations' digital signals are multiplexed:

Channel Video Aspect PSIP Short Name Programming[18]
xx.1 1080i 16:9 MPT-HD Main MPT programming / PBS
xx.2 720p MPT-2 PBS Encore (7:30 p.m.–11:30 p.m.) / Create[19]
xx.3 480i MPTKIDS PBS Kids
xx.4 NHK-WLD NHK World

Analog-to-digital conversion

MPT's stations shut down their analog signals on June 12, 2009, the official date in which full-power television stations in the United States transitioned from analog to digital broadcasts under federal mandate. The station's digital channel allocations post-transition are as follows:[20]

  • WMPB shut down its analog signal, over UHF channel 67; the station's digital signal remained on its pre-transition UHF channel 29,[21] using PSIP to display the station's virtual channel as its former UHF analog channel 67, which was among the high band UHF channels (52-69) that were removed from broadcasting use as a result of the transition.
  • WMPT shut down its analog signal, over UHF channel 22; the station's digital signal remained on its pre-transition UHF channel 42,[22] using PSIP to display the station's virtual channel as its former UHF analog channel 22.
  • WCPB shut down its analog signal, over UHF channel 28; the station's digital signal relocated from its pre-transition UHF channel 56, which was among the high band UHF channels (52-69) that were removed from broadcasting use as a result of the transition, to its analog-era UHF channel 28.[23]
  • WWPB shut down its analog signal, over UHF channel 31; the station's digital signal remained on its pre-transition UHF channel 44,[24] using PSIP to display the station's virtual channel as its former UHF analog channel 31.
  • WGPT shut down its analog signal, over UHF channel 36; the station's digital signal relocated from its pre-transition UHF channel 54, which was among the high band UHF channels (52-69) that were removed from broadcasting use as a result of the transition, to its analog-era UHF channel 36.[25]
  • WFPT shut down its analog signal, over UHF channel 62; the station's digital signal remained on its pre-transition UHF channel 28,[26] using PSIP to display the station's virtual channel as its former UHF analog channel 62, which was among the high band UHF channels (52-69) that were removed from broadcasting use as a result of the transition.

Spectrum reallocation

As a part of the repacking process following the 2016–2017 FCC incentive auction, channels 38 through 51 will be removed from television broadcasting. None of MPT's stations sold their allocations, but five of them will move channels within the UHF band: WMPT will move to channel 21, WMPB to channel 22, WWPB to channel 29, WGPT to channel 26, and WCPT to channel 16.[27]

Awards

For 2008, MPT received 14 Emmy Award nominations from the National Capital Chesapeake Bay Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences (NATAS). MPT received Emmys for Eatin' Crabs Chesapeake Style, two awards for Bob the Vid Tech: The Mystery of the Missing Pizza and one for ArtWorks: Manuel Barrueco Special.

MPT received two 2008 CINE Golden Eagle Awards for The Transformation Age: Surviving a Technology Revolution with Robert X. Cringely, a coproduction of MPT/University of Maryland Robert H. Smith School of Business, and Lethal Landscapes: Canvases of the Combat Artist.

For 2007, the station received 11 nominations and won 1 National Capitol Emmy including 3 nominations for their regional The War series and 5 nominations for Outdoors Maryland. Motorweek also received the Board of Governors Award.[28]

References

  1. ^ Katy June-Friesen (January 12, 2009). "Many stations packaging their own kids' channels". Current. Archived from the original on January 23, 2016. Retrieved December 9, 2010.
  2. ^ "More downsizing at MPT as master control function shifts to Boston". The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved 8 September 2015.
  3. ^ "Vietnam Veterans". Maryland Public Television. Retrieved 2013-09-04.
  4. ^ "Welcome to Chesapeake Collectibles". Maryland Public Television. 2013-01-10. Retrieved 2013-08-11.
  5. ^ "Maryland Farm and Harvest". Maryland Public Television. 2013-01-10. Retrieved 2013-08-11.
  6. ^ "Chesapeake Bay Week". Maryland Public Television. Retrieved 2013-09-04.
  7. ^ "About Direct Connection". Maryland Public Television. Retrieved 2013-09-04.
  8. ^ "Outdoors Maryland". Maryland Public Television. Retrieved 2013-09-04.
  9. ^ "State Circle". Maryland Public Television. Retrieved 2013-09-04.
  10. ^ "Ways to Pay for College". Maryland Public Television. Retrieved 2013-09-04.
  11. ^ "Your Money & Business". Maryland Public Television. Retrieved 2013-09-04.
  12. ^ "Artworks". Maryland Public Television. Retrieved 2013-09-04.
  13. ^ "Our Town". Maryland Public Television. Retrieved 2013-09-04.
  14. ^ "About Lynn Fischer".
  15. ^ "The Transformation Age". Robert H. Smith School of Business.
  16. ^ "DW62AY Facility Data". FCCData.
  17. ^ "DW36AB Facility Data". FCCData.
  18. ^ "WMPT Annapolis". RabbitEars.Info. Retrieved September 4, 2017.
  19. ^ "mpt2/Create TV". MPT.
  20. ^ "DTV Tentative Channel Designations for the First and the Second Rounds" (PDF). Retrieved 2012-03-24.
  21. ^ "CDBS Print". Federal Communications Commission.
  22. ^ "CDBS Print". Federal Communications Commission.
  23. ^ "CDBS Print". Federal Communications Commission.
  24. ^ "CDBS Print". Federal Communications Commission.
  25. ^ "CDBS Print". Federal Communications Commission.
  26. ^ "CDBS Print". Federal Communications Commission.
  27. ^ "Repack Channel Assignments". RabbitEars.
  28. ^ "2007 Emmy Award Recipients". The National Capital Chesapeake Bay Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences.

External links

This page was last edited on 26 November 2019, at 05:51
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