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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Mary Salas
Mary Salas at Clinton Rally (1).jpg
Salas at a Hillary Clinton rally in 2016
40th Mayor of Chula Vista
Assumed office
December 9, 2014
Preceded byCheryl Cox
Member of the California State Assembly
from the 79th district
In office
December 4, 2006 – November 30, 2010
Preceded byJuan Vargas
Succeeded byBen Hueso
Member of Chula Vista City Council from the Fourth District
In office
2012–2014
Preceded bySteve Castañeda[1]
Succeeded bySteve Miesen
In office
1996–2004
Preceded byBob Fox[1]
Succeeded bySteve Castañeda[1]
Personal details
Born (1948-03-17) March 17, 1948 (age 72)
Chula Vista, California
NationalityAmerican
Political partyDemocratic
Spouse(s)Sal Salas
Children2
ResidenceChula Vista, California
Alma materSan Diego State University
Southwestern College
OccupationSocial worker

Mary Casillas Salas is an American politician from Chula Vista, California. She is a former California Assembly member who represented the 79th Assembly District from 2006 to 2010. She ran for the California State Senate in 2010 but lost. In 2012 she was elected to the Chula Vista City Council, a position she previously held from 1996 to 2004. She was elected Mayor of the city of Chula Vista in 2014.

Early life

Salas' father, is one of 9 children of Felix and Urbana Casillas, who once lived in the La Punta adobe, after moving to the United States, through El Paso, from Mexico.[2] Salas was born in 1948 in Chula Vista.

Education

Salas earned a Bachelor of Arts degree I. Social Work in San Diego State University. [3]

In college, she became involved with MANA de San Diego, a women's organization that mentors young Latinas, which led her into city politics.

Career

Early career

Salas served as a member of Chula Vista's Civil Service Commission and Planning Commission.[citation needed]

Initial City Council tenure

In 1996, Salas was elected as a member of city council in Chula Vista. Salas became the first Latina elected to the Chula Vista City Council, and second person of latinx descent on the City Council, after Steve Padilla.[4] In 2000, as an incumbent, Salas was re-elected as a member of Chula Vista City Council. As a councilwoman, she chaired the University Working Group to establish a higher education center in the region and co-chaired the Blue Ribbon Committee for the "San Diego County Preschool for All." She gained a reputation as a member who was willing to speak her mind.[5][3]

Salas led many efforts to support historic preservation.[6] This included leading an effort for the city to adopt the Mills Act, giving owners of historic houses tax breaks for property repair.[6]

In 2001, Salas was early to call for San Diego Unified Port District Board member David Malcolm to resign over his consulting contract with Duke Energy, which he would ultimately do in early 2002.[6]

Salas was term-limited out of the city council in 2004,[5] being barred from serving more than two terms consecutively.

2002 mayoral campaign

In 2002, Salas ran in the open-race for mayor against fellow city councilmember and political ally Steve Padilla, but lost.[1][4] Salas had placed a narrow first in the first-round of the election, but had failed to receive a full majority of the vote, thus triggering a runoff. She lost the runoff.[1]

The election was an open-race, as incumbent Shirley Horton was term-limited.[7]

With both Salas and Padilla running, the election marked the first-time that two incumbent Chula Vista City Council members had run for mayor.[8] The election was also historic in that all three candidates running (Salas, Padilla, and Petra Barajas) were hispanic, guaranteeing that the city would elect its first hispanic mayor.[9][10]

Salas collected some big-name endorsements.[4] These included Bob Filner, as well organizations such as the AFSCME, Chula Vista Employees Association, and United Domestic Workers.[11] She was also endorsed ahead of the primary by the editorial board of the La Presna San Diego newspaper.[9]

The race between Salas and Padilla was regarded as closely contested.[4][6][11]

Salas pledged to bring a broader vision to enhancing the city's regional economic importance.[6] She also noted community concerns, such as illegal evictions and areas of the city being in need of sidewalks.[6]

Salas proposed fast-tracking roadway projects to alleviate traffic congestion stemming from the city's rapid growth.[6]

With much political overlap between Salas and Padilla, the race was seen as being debated on which candidate had the superior experience to lead the city.[4]

Throughout the campaign, Salas and Padilla criticized each other for accepting campaign contributions from different real estate developers.[11]

A tense race from its inception, in the closing days of the general election, things became particularly hostile as both candidates assailed each other's records.[8] Additionally, Padilla's campaign circulated literature quoting Salas as having used the word "gringos" in a quote to the newspaper El Latino.[12]

Voter turnout was significantly lower in the 2002 election than it had been in the previous two elections.[8]

Post-city council membership of boards

Salas was a mamber of the South Bay Irrigation District from 2004 through 2006.[13]

Salas joined the Sweetwater Authority Board of Directors in 2006.[14]

California State Assembly

Mary Salas and National City Mayor Ron Morrison celebrating the United States Navy's 234th birthday in 2009
Mary Salas and National City Mayor Ron Morrison celebrating the United States Navy's 234th birthday in 2009

Salas was elected to the California State Assembly in 2006, defeating Jean Roesch. She represented the 79th district which includes the communities of National City, Coronado, Imperial Beach and parts of Chula Vista and San Diego. Salas was appointed Chair of the Committee on Veterans Affairs in 2007. She also served on the following standing committees: Jobs, Economic Development, and the Economy; Water, Parks and Wildlife; and the Committee on Health. She was re-elected in 2008. In 2010 she campaigned for California State Senate but lost narrowly to Juan Vargas.[15]

Return to City Council

In 2012 Salas ran again for election to the Chula Vista City Council, representing District 4. In the November runoff election she defeated Linda Wagner, 57.6% to 42.3%.[16]

Mayoralty

Mary Salas was sworn-in as the first Latina Mayor of Chula Vista, California in December 9, 2014.[17][18][19][20][21][22] She was sworn-in for a second term in December 2018.

Election campaigns

2014

Having run unsuccessfully in 2002, Salas made her second attempt at the mayoralty of Chula Vista in the 2014 election. This was the first mayoral election to take place in Chula Vista following the passage of a 2012 proposition which amended the city charter to require mandatory candidate runoffs, meaning that, even if a candidate obtains more than 50% of the vote in the primary, a second round of the election would be held between the top-two finishers.[23] Municipal elections in California are officially non-partisan.

The election was an open-race, since incumbent mayor Cheryl Cox was term-limited.[24][25] There were two other candidates running. One was Jerry Rindone, who had been a member of the Chula Vista City Council from 1990 through 1998 and again from 2000 through 2008, as well as the vice chairman of Metropolitan Transit System, a member of the San Diego County Board of Education from 2008 through 2012, and president of Chula Vista Chamber of Commerce in 2013.[13] The other was Pamela Bensoussan, who had been a member of the Chula Vista City Council since 2008.[26]

In the first round, Salas placed first and Rindone second, thus the two advanced to the second round.[1]

In the second round, Salas carried the endorsements of the San Diego County Democratic Party, Chula Vista Democratic Club, Eastlake-Bonita Democratic Club, Chula Vista Police Officers Association, and Chula Vista Firefighters Local 2180.[13] Rindone carried the endorsements of the San Diego County Republican Party, Chula Vista Chamber of Commerce, Chula Vista Bonita Republican Women Federated, Latino American Political Association of San Diego, and U-T San Diego.[13]

Salas won the November 4 general election.[1]

2018

Salas ran for reelection in 2018.

Salas' pledge for a second term as mayor was that she would work to bring a four-year university to Chula Vista, complete the multi-billion dollar Bayfront development, address infrastructure concerns, and hire more police officers and firefighters.[27][28]

Salas had three opponents. One was Hector Gastelum, a Republican serving as a member of the Otay Water District and working as a realtor with the firm Big Block Realty.[27][29] The other two was Chula Vista Parks Supervisor Daniel Schreck and educator Arthur Kende.[30][29]

Schreck, who had worked in Chula Vista's government for twenty-five years and was currently the Chula Vista Parks Supervisor, was the only challenger with municipal government experience.[28] He positioned himself as a government insider but a political outsider.[28] Arthur Kende, who had taught at San Diego Jobs Corps for the previous eight years, was the youngest candidate, at age 36, and the only one without government experience.[28] Kende campaigned as a candidate who wanted cut through bureaucratic "red tape".[28]

Castelum campaigned as a conservative opposed to "big government" and "political correctness", and an enemy of the organization Planned Parenthood.[27][29] Gastelum also campaigned against the city's status as a sanctuary city.[31] Anti-muslim tweets by Gastelum from 2017, which he refused to apologize for, attracted attention.[30] The tweet in question read, "Let's pressure our legislature to create a list of so-called #MuslimBan to prevent #SubHuman #Scum from #USA to #MAGA".[32] Of those challenging Salas, Gastelum had the strongest name recognition, largely due to the controversy that this 2017 tweet had generated.[28] The city also had growing pension costs.[28]

Salas' opponents all criticized the economic problems of the city.[28] Chula Vista generated the second-lowest per capita tax revenues in San Diego County due to population growth having occurred faster than revenue growth.[28] Consequentially, city services had not kept in pace with demand.[28]

Salas went into the first-round of the election having vastly out-fundraised her opponents.[28]

Having, respectively, placed first and second in the first-round of the election, held June 5, Salas and Castelum advanced to the second round. Salas had received 62.48% of the first-round vote and Gastelum had received 16.98%. Both Schreck and Kende were eliminated.[1]

In the second-round of the election, Salas bore the endorsement of the San Diego County Democratic Party,[33] as well as the endorsement of San Diego Democrats for Equality.[34]

Salas won the second-round of the election by a landslide, receiving 71.86% of the vote to Gastelum's 28.14%.[1]

Personal life

Salas' husband is Sal Salas. They have two children. Salas and her family reside in Chula Vista, California.[3]

Electoral history

City council

1996 Chula Vista City Council seat 4 election[1]
Candidate First round Runoff
Votes % Votes %
Mary Salas 6,698 29.4 22,106 54.9
Jim Cartmill 6,501 28.5 18,135 45.1
Dean Archibald 2,304 15.9
Scot William Davenport 2,304 10.1
Michelle Castognola 1,894 8.3
Archie McAllister 1,777 7.8
2000 Chula Vista City Council seat 4 election[1]
Candidate Votes %
Mary Salas (incumbent) 16,517 66.17
Richard Gonzales 8,443 33.83
2012 Chula Vista City Council seat 4 election[1]
Candidate First round Runoff
Votes % Votes %
Mary Salas 13,205 48.85 40,426 50.15
Linda Wagner 7,192 26.61 28,250 35.05
London Meservy 6,566 24.29

State Assembly

2006
2006 California's 79th Assembly district Democratic primary[35]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mary Salas 14,992 63.2
Democratic Greg R. Sandoval 6,388 26.9
Democratic Jesse Albritten 2,367 9.9
2006 California's 79th Assembly district election[36]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mary Salas 39,437 62.8
Republican Jean Roesch 23,395 37.2
2008
2008 California's 79th Assembly district Democratic primary[37]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mary Salas (incumbent) 17,865 86.8
Democratic Jesse Albritten 2,718 13.2
2008 California's 79th Assembly district election[38]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mary Salas (incumbent) 74,051 69.50
Republican Derrick W. Roach 32,526 30.50

State Senate

2010 California's 40th State Senate district Democratic primary[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Juan Vargas 24,282 50.1
Democratic Mary Salas 24,260 49.9

Mayor

2002 Chula Vista mayoral election[1]
Candidate First round Runoff
Votes % Votes %
Steve Padilla 10,519 47.3 18,978 53.8
Mary Salas 10,699 48.1 16,286 46.1
Peter E. Barajas 996 4.4 7A 0.0
^A Barajas received 7 votes as a write-in in the runoff
2014 Chula Vista mayoral election[1]
Candidate Primary election General election
Votes % Votes %
Mary Salas 9,808 44.07 19,995 52.87
Jerry R. Rindone 8,638 38.82 17,827 47.13
Pamela Bensoussan 3,732 16.78
2018 Chula Vista mayoral election[1]
Candidate Primary election General election
Votes % Votes %
Mary Salas (incumbent) 24,572 62.48 54,062 71.86
Hector Gastelum 6,676 16.98 21,175 28.14
Daniel Schreck 4,408 11.21
Arthur Kende 3,547 9.02

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o "ELECTION DAY Results 1911-2018". Office of the City Clerk of Chula Vista. Retrieved 6 October 2019.
  2. ^ Schoenherr, Steve (12 December 2014). "La Punta". SunnyCV. South Bay Historical Society. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 3 May 2018.
  3. ^ a b c "Mary Salas' Biography". Vote Smart. Retrieved May 25, 2020.
  4. ^ a b c d e Oakes, Amy (6 November 2002). "Chula Vista mayoral candidates run close contest". www.signonsandiego.com. San Diego Union-Tribune. Archived from the original on 19 November 2002. Retrieved 22 September 2020.
  5. ^ a b San Diego Union Tribune, December 2, 2004
  6. ^ a b c d e f g "Chula Vista mayor race looks tight". San Diego Union-Tribune. 22 November 2002. Archived from the original on 19 November 2002.
  7. ^ "South Bay to choose 3 mayors; 1 incumbent not running". www.signonsandiego.com. San Diego Union-Tribune. 22 November 2002. Archived from the original on 22 November 2002. Retrieved 22 September 2020.
  8. ^ a b c Oakes, Amy (7 November 2002). "Padilla prevails in close campaign". www.signonsandiego.com. San Diego Union-Tribune. Archived from the original on 20 November 2002.
  9. ^ a b "Salas for Mayor of Chula Vista". www.laprensa-sandiego.org. La Presna San Diego. 22 February 2002.
  10. ^ "Councilmember Stephen C. Padilla - District 3 | City of Chula Vista". www.chulavistaca.gov. Retrieved 22 September 2020.
  11. ^ a b c Oakes, Amy (2 November 2002). "Growth is issue in Chula Vista". www.signonsandiego.com. San Diego Union-Tribune. Archived from the original on 19 November 2002.
  12. ^ Oakes, Amy (1 November 2002). "Chula Vista to have 1st Latino mayor". www.signonsandiego.com. San Diego Union-Tribune. Archived from the original on 20 November 2002.
  13. ^ a b c d Mento, Tarryn. "Jobs Top Issue In Chula Vista Mayor, Council Races". KPBS Public Media. Retrieved 22 April 2020.
  14. ^ joincalifornia.com
  15. ^ a b "Statement of Vote June 8, 2010, Statewide Direct Primary Election" (PDF). California Secretary of State. Retrieved 12 September 2020.
  16. ^ "General Election, Tuesday, November 6, 2012". San Diego County Registrar of Voters. Retrieved 9 November 2012.
  17. ^ "U-T San Diego: Salas heads into mayoral seat, December 9, 2014".
  18. ^ https://www.thestarnews.com/tag/latina-mayor/
  19. ^ "U-T San Diego: Salas heads into mayoral seat, December 9, 2014". December 4, 2014.
  20. ^ "Councilwoman Mary Salas Sworn in as First Latina Chula Vista Mayor".
  21. ^ Navarro, Sharon A.; Hernandez, Samantha L.; Navarro, Leslie A. (May 12, 2016). Latinas in American Politics: Changing and Embracing Political Tradition. Lexington Books. ISBN 9781498533362 – via Google Books. Of the largest 100 cities two have a Latina mayor: Corpus Cristi, TX and Chula Vista, CA. Despite the trends and political implications, previous studies of minorities and women in politics have failed to include Latina officeholders.
  22. ^ "Mary Salas: 'First elected Latina mayor' of Chula Vista | fox5sandiego.com". webcache.googleusercontent.com.
  23. ^ Luzzaro, Susan (8 August 2014). "Democracy costs, even in Chula Vista | San Diego Reader". www.sandiegoreader.com.
  24. ^ Mento, Tarryn (5 November 2014). "Salas, Aguilar Victorious In Chula Vista City Races". KPBS Public Media. Retrieved 22 April 2020.
  25. ^ Sampite-Montecalvo, Allison (5 November 2014). "Salas, McCann, Aguilar lead Chula Vista race". baltimoresun.com. Retrieved 22 April 2020.
  26. ^ "Pamela Bensoussan". Ballotpedia. Retrieved 22 April 2020.
  27. ^ a b c Solis, Gustavo (22 October 2019). "Chula Vista mayoral hopefuls prepare for November". nydailynews.com. New York Daily News. Retrieved 21 April 2020.
  28. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "Chula Vista mayor: Economic growth is at the center of the campaign". San Diego Union-Tribune. 23 May 2018. Retrieved 21 April 2020.
  29. ^ a b c "Chula Vista mayor headed to runoff with Republican challenger". fox5sandiego.com. KSWB-TV. 6 June 2018. Retrieved 21 April 2020.
  30. ^ a b "Chula Vista mayoral candidate called anti-Muslim". KGTV. 13 March 2018. Retrieved 21 April 2020.
  31. ^ Zaragoza, Barbara (13 March 2018). "Anti-immigrant tweeter won't change | San Diego Reader". www.sandiegoreader.com. San Diego Reader. Retrieved 21 April 2020.
  32. ^ Moreno, Robert (15 January 2018). "Censure stays in place, Gastelum won't change". www.thestarnews.com. The Start News. Retrieved 21 April 2020.
  33. ^ "Democratic Candidates 2018". San Diego County Democratic Party. 17 March 2017. Retrieved 20 April 2020.
  34. ^ "2018 Endorsements – San Diego Democrats for Equality | Since 1975". Retrieved 20 April 2020.
  35. ^ "Statement of Vote Gubernatorial Primary Election June 6, 2006" (PDF). California Secretary of State. Retrieved 12 September 2020.
  36. ^ "STATEMENT OF VOTE" (PDF). California Secretary of State. Retrieved 12 September 2020.
  37. ^ "Microsoft Word - 00_table_of_contents.doc" (PDF). California Secretary of State. Retrieved 12 September 2020.
  38. ^ "Statement of Vote November 4, 2008, General Election" (PDF). California Secretary of State. Retrieved 12 September 2020.

External links

Political offices
Preceded by
Cheryl Cox
Mayor of Chula Vista
December 9, 2014 – present
Succeeded by
Incumbent
Preceded by
Steve Castaneda
Chula Vista City Councilmember
"District 4"

2012–2014
Succeeded by
Steve Miesen
Preceded by
Bob Fox
Chula Vista City Councilmember
"District 4"

1996–2004
Succeeded by
Steve Castañeda
California Assembly
Preceded by
Juan Vargas
California State Assemblywoman
79th District

December 4, 2006 – November 30, 2010
Succeeded by
Ben Hueso
This page was last edited on 23 September 2020, at 02:15
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