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Mary Jepkosgei Keitany

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Mary Jepkosgei Keitany
Mary Keitany nyc.jpg
Personal information
Born (1982-01-18) 18 January 1982 (age 37)
Kabarnet, Baringo County, Kenya
Weight42 kg (93 lb)
Sport
CountryKenya
SportAthletics
Event(s)Marathon
Achievements and titles
Personal best(s)

Mary Jepkosgei Keitany (born 18 January 1982) is a Kenyan long distance runner. She is the world record holder in a women-only marathon, having won the 2017 London Marathon in a time of 2:17:01. As of November 2019, she sits third all-time at both the marathon and half marathon.

Her former half marathon best of 1:05:50 (2011) lived three years as the women's world record. She also has held the world record at 10 miles (50:05 minutes), 20 kilometres (1:02:36), and 25 kilometres (1:19:53), all of which were set in road races. In August 2018 she was honored by the Shoe4Africa foundation and she opened the Mary Keitany Shoe4Africa school in Torokwonin, Baringo County, Kenya.[1]. She, and her husband Charles, sit on the Shoe4Africa school board.[2].

YouTube Encyclopedic

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  • ✪ Running Analysis: How Mary Keitany broke the Marathon World Record

Transcription

Hey guys it's Dr. JP and today we're going to analyze Mary Keitany as she broke the woman's only marathon world record during the London Marathon in 2017. We will look at different aspects of her running form and see what makes her one of the fastest long-distance runners in the world. First ,let's take a look at her time splits during the London Marathon. In this race, she was going at an incredible pace during the first half of the marathon. She completed the first five kilometers in 15 minutes and 31 seconds. She was at a 306 min per kilometer pace which is very quick. She actually was able to keep up this pace into the 10 kilometer mark as she did this in 31 minutes and 17 seconds. And she completed the half marathon split in one hour 6 minutes and 54 seconds which is the fastest woman's half marathon split. She was on track to run the fastest marathon time for the woman which is held by Radcliffe; however, during the second half of the marathon she basically started to slow down... until the very end of the race she finished strong completing her last mile at a time of 4 minutes and 56 seconds. She wasn't able to run the fastest woman's marathon time, but she did break the woman's only marathon world record, which is still an incredible feat. Before we take a closer look at her form, I want to give you some context on the clip we will be analyzing. This takes place during her strong finish in the last mile. Now, ideally I would have loved to have this view of her running during the beginning or middle part of the race as there is most likely some form breakdown during the end of the race; however, this is the only good side clip I've been able to find throughout the entire marathon. Now, let's take a look at her stride frequency and stride length as these are general components that make up speed in this clip. She presents with a step rate of 180 steps per minute which is a common rate among many elite long-distance runners; however she did maintain a slightly higher cadence during the middle part of the race with a rate of 200 steps per minute. This is good as maintaining a high cadence usually leads to decreased stress on the joint and decreased risk of injury which is vital in these long-distance races. Now, based on a few calculations we can take a look at her step length. During this clip, she presents with a step length of 1.81 meters. Now this is very high. The reason for this is most likely due to her explosive power to finish the race and long legs, but also there's just a slight increase in reaching out forward, which will specifically talk about later. Anyway let's also compare this to the middle of the race where she presented with a step length of 1.67 meters. This is lower compared to her final mile, but she still presents with a naturally high step length. Now let's take a closer look at Mary Keitany's running form and see how her form helped her break the world record with a combination of a high step rate and step length. First, let's take a look at the landing. Throughout the race she goes between mid foot and rear foot landing. As I said mentioned in the previous video rear foot landing is not necessarily bad it just gets a bad reputation as when recreational runners usually heel strike they are also taking a step too far forward, which can lead to increased injury. Now let's just take a look at where her foot lands in relation to the body. As you can see, she does land slightly in front of the body. It's slightly farther ahead compared to the other runners we have analyzed before. but we also have to take account for the length of her legs. Despite it being a bit farther away, she still mostly lands with the shin parallel to the ground line for smooth energy transfer from landing on the ground to pushing off. In this last mile, she does intermittently present with the shin angle slightly out which does indicate slight over-striding. Over striding causes a braking mechanism to occur leading to an increased stress in the ankle and knee joint. When she does do it, there is not a crazy amount of it going on and is most likely due to a bit of form breakdown toward the end of a very long race. Now let's take a look at the leg movement as the foot makes contact to the ground to when she pushes off the ground. Now, what I'm taking a closer look at is how the hip moves backwards during push off. As you can see, she presents with good back side hip moving as she pushes off the ground. Doing so really maximizes uses of power from the hips optimising force production during each stride resulting in higher step length and faster speeds. Now, let's take a look at vertical oscillation which is the amount of up-and-down movement that occurs when she runs. As you can see, there's not much of it going on. This is a good thing as excessive vertical oscillation can lead to increased stress on the joints leading to increased likelihood of injury. The way Keitany minimizes this movement is primarily through maintaining a high cadence and really utilizing those hips turning push off. Now let's take a look at her trunk. She keeps it upright and in good alignment. It may seem bent forward but that is because the whole body slightly tilted forward. Maintaining this slight forward body tilt aids in improved momentum forward and improved ability to use those hip extensors for improved push off forward... which may be part of the reason for the improved step length without excessive vertical movement. Now let's take a look at arm movement. She keeps her arms up high with most of the movement happening at the shoulders. Typically with elite long distance runners, most of the arm swing occurs at the shoulders as well; however Mary Keitany seems to present with more shoulder movement than other runners we have looked at before. Now let's take a look at head position. Even at the end of the race ,she maintains this neutral head position basically just looking straight ahead. Keeping this alignment allows for slightly improved core stability and exchange of oxygen during this race. And that's it for the quick analysis on Mary Keitany! I hope you guys enjoyed this video. I hope you're able to learning something that you apply to your own running as well. If you haven't already, please subscribe to my youtube channel as well as my Instagram for more content as well. And as always...THANK YOU FOR WATCHING!!!

Contents

Career

Born in Kabarnet, Baringo County, Keitany started running while in primary school. In 2002, she joined the Hidden Talent Academy.

2006

In January, she placed 21st in her first senior race at the Shoe4Africa 5 kilometre women's race.[3] After some success in local races, she competed abroad for the first time, winning some road races in Europe.[citation needed]

2007

She won a silver medal at the World Road Running Championships, finishing second to Lornah Kiplagat who broke the world record.

2009

After a year out due to pregnancy, she returned to competition at the World 10K Bangalore in May.[4] She set a new personal best but finished one second behind winner Aselefech Mergia.[5]

In September, she won the Lille Half Marathon with a finish time of 1:07:00, which was the seventh fastest of all-time.[6]

This performance qualified her for the World Half Marathon Championships in Birmingham, where she outpaced Aberu Kebede to win her first world championship, set a new personal best of 1:06:36, and broke the championship record. She won a second gold medal as part of the winning Kenyan squad in the team competition. Reflecting on the win, she noted, "It's my best ever time, so I'm so happy.... I had a baby just 1 year and 3 months ago." Her 15 kilometre interval time, 46:51 minutes, was faster than the world record of 46:55 held by Kayoko Fukushi of Japan; however, Keitany's time was not ratified as a new world record because of the lower elevation of the 15 kilometre mark compared to the race start.[7] Her time was the second fastest ever in the half marathon (after Lornah Kiplagat). The half marathon time was a new African record, with the previous record of 1:06:44 hours set by Elana Meyer of South Africa in 1999. Keitany also beat the previous Kenyan record of 1:06:48 that she set in Udine two years earlier.[8] The director of the New York City Marathon, Mary Wittenberg, suggested that she could become a world-beater over the full marathon distance in the coming years.[4]

2010

She won the Abu Dhabi Half Marathon.[9]

She also won the Berlin 25 kilometre race, setting a new world record of 1:19:53 hours. The previous record was set by Mizuki Noguchi of Japan in 2005. Keitany finished almost five minutes ahead of runner-up Alice Timbilili.[10]

In preparing for the New York City Marathon, she won the Portugal Half Marathon in Lisbon in September, leading from the front to win largely uncontested in a time of 1:08:46.[11]

In her debut at the New York City Marathon, she was among the leading three for much of the race but faded to finish third in a time of 2:29:01 hours.[12]

2011

Keitany began the year in record-breaking form as she won the Ras Al Khaimah Half Marathon with a world record time of 1:05:50 hours. This marked the first time a woman had run the distance in under 1:06 hours on a non-aided course. She also set other records along the way, including a world record of 1:02:36 for 20 kilometres and world best times for 8 kilometres and 10 miles.[13]

She then won the London Marathon in a time of 2:19:17, pulling away from the field at the 14-mile mark and becoming the fourth fastest woman ever over the marathon distance.[14]

In September, she won the Portugal Half Marathon for the second time and improved upon her own course record with a winning time of 1:07:54 hours.[15]

She was the pre-race favourite for the New York City Marathon, where she built a significant lead by the halfway point (running at more than four minutes faster than the course record). She slowed dramatically, however, in the second half of the race and was overtaken by Firehiwot Dado and Buzunesh Deba, leaving her in third place with a finishing time of 2:23:38 hours.[16]

2012

She intended to improve her world record mark at the Ras Al Khaimah Half Marathon, but windy conditions slowed her to a finish time of 1:06:49 hours.[17]

At the London Marathon, she broke Catherine Ndereba's African record with a winning time of 2:18:37 hours and became the third fastest woman ever at this distance.[18]

At the Summer Olympics in London, she ran a fast pace among the lead pack until the 41 kilometre mark, where she fell behind to finish fourth.[19]

2013

She announced her pregnancy at the start of 2013 and skipped that year's competitions.[20]

2014

On 2 November, Keitany battled with eventual second-place finisher Jemima Sumgong to win the New York City Marathon in a time of 2:25:07.[21]

2015

At the London Marathon, Keitany was one of the "Fantastic Four" of Kenyans (consisting of Keitany, Edna Kiplagat, Florence Kiplagat, and Priscah Jeptoo) who were expected to win the race and possibly challenge Paula Radcliffe's course record (and women's world record). Down the last stretch of the race, Keitany battled Ethiopian Tirfi Tsegaye, with Keitany finishing second in 2:23:40 hours, 18 seconds behind winner Tigist Tufa from Ethiopia.[22] Keitany remarked after the race that she was affected by the wind and cold weather.[23]

2016

Keitany won the New York City Marathon in 2:24:26 hours. Sally Kipyego finished second (2:28:01), with Molly Huddle in third (2:28:13).

2017

Peres Jepchirchir won the Ras Al Khaimah Half Marathon on 10 February. Her finish time of 1:05:06 hours set a new world record, with Keitany finishing second with a new personal best of 1:05.13 hours. The third, fourth, and fifth-place finishers (Joyciline Jepkosgei, Jemima Sumgong, and Tirunesh Dibaba) also set new personal bests.[24]

In April, Keitany won the London Marathon, setting a new world record (women only) at 2:17:01 hours. She bettered Radcliffe's record by 41 seconds, which she set at the 2005 London Marathon. Tirunesh Dibaba finished second, 55 seconds behind.[25] (Radcliffe has run a faster time in a mixed gender event, but that is a separate record.) Her 1st half marathon split time was 1:06:54 hours.[26]

She won the TD Beach to Beacon 10k on 5 August 2017 in a course record time of 30:41 minutes. She improved the cr set at last year's run.[27]

Keitany did not be compete at the World Championships in London.[28]

On 10 September 2017, Keitany won the 2017 Great North Run in 1:05:59, 20 seconds off her course record from 2014.[29]

On 5 November 2017, Keitany finished at the TCS New York City Marathon at a time of 2:27:54.

2018

On 4 November 2018, Keitany won the TCS New York City Marathon in a time of 2:22:48,[30] a time just 17 seconds off the course record. For the first half she needed 75:30 and the second 66:58, in a womens only race. Her 10 k intervall times were 37:07, 35:02, 31:33, 31:47 and 7:19 for the last 2.195 km. Keitany s time between km 25 and km 35 was 30:53. Vivian Cheruiyot as the runner up finished in 2:26:02 and last years winner Shalene Flanagan in third place with 2:26:22.[31]

2019

Keitany came second at the New York City Marathon behind half marathon world record holder and debutante Joyciline Jepkosgei in 2:23:32. [32]

Personal life

She is married to another runner Charles Koech and gave birth to her first child, Jared, in June 2008,[33] and her second child, Samantha, in April 2013. She stopped training and other sporting activities at the third month of pregnancy, and resumed when the babies were six months old.[34] She trains at the Adidas camp in Iten, is managed by Gianni Demadonna.[35]

Major competition record

Year Competition Venue Position Event Notes
2007 World Road Running Championships Udine, Italy 2nd Half marathon 1:06:48 NR
2009 World Half Marathon Championships Birmingham, United Kingdom 1st Half marathon 1:06:36 AR
2010 New York Marathon New York, United States 3rd Marathon 2:29:01
2011 London Marathon London, United Kingdom 1st Marathon 2:19:19
New York Marathon New York, United States 3rd Marathon 2:23:38
2012 London Marathon London, United Kingdom 1st Marathon 2:18:37 AR
Olympic Games London, United Kingdom 4th Marathon 2:23:56
2014 New York Marathon New York, United States 1st Marathon 2:25:07
2015 London Marathon London, United Kingdom 2nd Marathon 2:23:40
New York Marathon New York, United States 1st Marathon 2:24:25
2016 London Marathon London, United Kingdom 9th Marathon 2:28:30
New York Marathon New York, United States 1st Marathon 2:24:26
2017 London Marathon London, United Kingdom 1st Marathon 2:17:01 WRwo
New York Marathon New York, United States 2nd Marathon 2:27:54
2018 London Marathon London, United Kingdom 5th Marathon 2:24:27
New York Marathon New York, United States 1st Marathon 2:22:48
2019 London Marathon London, United Kingdom 5th Marathon 2:20:58
New York Marathon New York, United States 2nd Marathon 2:23:32

Road races

Year Competition Venue Position Event Notes
2006 Sevilla Half Marathon Seville, Spain 1st Half marathon
São Silvestre Olivais 10K Lisbon, Portugal 1st 10 km [36]
2007 Almeria Half Marathon Almeria, Spain 1st Half marathon
Vitry-sur-Seine Humarathon Paris, France 1st Half marathon
Puy-en-Velay 15k Puy-en-Velay, France 1st 15 km
Lille Half Marathon Lille, France 1st Half marathon 1:08:43
2009 Lille Half Marathon Lille, France 1st Half marathon 1:07:00
Delhi Half Marathon New Delhi, India 1st Half marathon 1:06:54
2010 New York Marathon New York, USA 3rd Marathon 2:29:01
2011 Ras Al Khaimah Half Marathon Ras Al Khaimah, UAE 1st Half marathon 1:05:50 Former WR
London Marathon London, UK 1st Marathon 2:19:19
New York Marathon New York, USA 3rd Marathon 2:23:38
2012 London Marathon London, UK 1st Marathon 2:18:37 NR
2014 New York Marathon New York, USA 1st Marathon 2:25:07
2015 London Marathon London, UK 2nd Marathon 2:23:40
New York Marathon New York, USA 1st Marathon 2:24:25
2016 London Marathon London, UK 9th Marathon 2:28:30
Beach to Beacon 10K Cape Elizabeth, Maine, USA 1st 10K 30:45.0 CR
New York Marathon New York, USA 1st Marathon 2:24:26
2017 Ras Al Khaimah Half Marathon Ras Al Khaimah, UAE 2nd Half marathon 1:05:13
London Marathon London, UK 1st Marathon 2:17:01 WR
New York Marathon New York, USA 2nd Marathon 2:27:54
2018 Ras Al Khaimah Half Marathon Ras Al Khaimah, UAE 2nd Half marathon 1:04:55
London Marathon London, UK 5th Marathon 2:24:27
New York Marathon New York, USA 1st Marathon 2:22:48
2019 London Marathon London, UK 5th Marathon 2:20:58
New York Marathon New York, USA 2nd Marathon 2:23:32

World Marathon Majors results

World Marathon Majors 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019
Tokyo Marathon - - - - - - - - -
Boston Marathon - - - - - - - - -
London Marathon - 1st 1st - - 2nd 9th 1st 5th 5th
Berlin Marathon - - - - - - - - -
Chicago Marathon - - - - - - - - -
New York Marathon 3rd 3rd - - 1st 1st 1st 2nd 1st 2nd

Personal bests

Distance Time Date City
1500m 4:29.7 13 June 2003 Nairobi, Kenya
5000 m 16:29.4 29 June 2006 Nairobi, Kenya
10,000 m 32:18.17 17 May 2007 Utrecht, Netherlands
10 km 30:41 August 2017 Cape Elizabeth, USA
15 km 46:30 10 February 2017 Ras Al Khaimah, UAE
20 km 1:01:52 10 February 2017 Ras Al Khaimah, UAE
Half marathon 1:04:55 9 February 2018 Ras Al Khaimah, UAE
25 km 1:19:53 9 May 2010 Berlin, Germany
30 km 1:39:11 17 April 2011 London, England
Marathon 2:17:01 23 April 2017 London, England

References

  1. ^ Tanser, Toby (12 August 2018). "Real Life Heroine". Daily Nation. Retrieved 12 August 2018.
  2. ^ Gearhart, Sarah (02 November 2019). "How Mary Keitany Went From Maid to Marathon Champion". New York Times. Retrieved 02 November 2019. Check date values in: |accessdate=, |date= (help)
  3. ^ Edwards, Myles (13 October 2011). "A Brief Chat With Mary Keitany". Runners World. Retrieved 23 April 2016.
  4. ^ a b Powell, David (11 October 2009). "Marathon beckons for Keitany – World Half Marathon, Birmingham". International Association of Athletics Federations. Archived from the original on 14 October 2009. Retrieved 11 October 2009.
  5. ^ Krishnan, Ram. Murali (31 May 2009). "Merga and Mergia take thrilling 10km victories in Bangalore". International Association of Athletics Federations. Archived from the original on 23 July 2009. Retrieved 11 October 2009.
  6. ^ Turner, Chris (7 September 2009). "Keitany powers to 67mins clocking in Lille Half Marathon". International Association of Athletics Federations. Archived from the original on 14 October 2009. Retrieved 11 October 2009.
  7. ^ Turner, Chris (11 October 2009). "Frustration turns to delight for Keitany – WOMEN's RACE REPORT – World Half Marathon, Birmingham". International Association of Athletics Federations. Retrieved 23 April 2016.
  8. ^ IAAF: Top List (as of 11 October 2009)
  9. ^ International Association of Athletics Federations, 8 January 2010: Fast wins for Keitany and Regassa in Abu Dhabi Half
  10. ^ Wenig, Jorg (9 May 2010). "Kosgei, Keitany shatter 25Km World records in Berlin – Updated". International Association of Athletics Federations. Retrieved 23 April 2016.
  11. ^ Fernandes, António Manuel (26 September 2010). "Tola and Keitany romp to Half Marathon victories in Lisbon". International Association of Athletics Federations. Retrieved 23 April 2016.
  12. ^ Dunaway, James (7 November 2010). "Gebremariam and Kiplagat cruise to New York victories". International Association of Athletics Federations. Retrieved 23 April 2016.
  13. ^ Hutchings, Tim (18 February 2011). "Keitany smashes Half Marathon World record in Ras Al Khaimah – UPDATED". International Association of Athletics Federations. Retrieved 23 April 2016.
  14. ^ Brown, Matthew (17 April 2011). "Mutai and Keitany dominate and dazzle in London". International Association of Athletics Federations. Retrieved 23 April 2016.
  15. ^ Fernandes, Antonio Manuel (25 September 2011). "Keitany smashes race record in Lisbon". International Association of Athletics Federations. Retrieved 23 April 2016.
  16. ^ Morse, Parker (6 November 2011). "G. Mutai smashes course record, Dado the surprise women's winner in New York". International Association of Athletics Federations. Retrieved 23 April 2016.
  17. ^ Hutchings, Tim (17 February 2012). "Keitany wins but records blown off course in windy RAK Half Marathon". International Association of Athletics Federations. Retrieved 23 April 2016.
  18. ^ Brown, Matthew (22 April 2012). "Kipsang and Keitany claim London titles for Kenya". International Association of Athletics Federations. Retrieved 22 February 2014.
  19. ^ Turner, Chris (5 August 2012). "London 2012 – Event Report – Women's Marathon". International Association of Athletics Federations. Retrieved 22 February 2014.
  20. ^ "Athletics-Kenyan runner Mary Keitany expecting second child". Reuters. Retrieved 22 February 2014.
  21. ^ "TCS NYC Marathon Overall Women Results". TCS NYC Marathon. 19 November 2013. Retrieved 2 November 2014.
  22. ^ Virgin Money London Marathon Leaderboard. Retrieved on 26 April 2015.
  23. ^ Robinson, Roger (26 April 2015). "Tigist Tufa is Surprise Women's Winner of London Marathon". Runner's World Newswire. Retrieved 26 April 2015.
  24. ^ Hutchings, Tim; Mulkeen, Jon (10 February 2017). "JEPCHIRCHIR BREAKS WORLD HALF MARATHON RECORD IN RAS AL-KHAIMAH". International Association of Athletics Federations. Retrieved 11 July 2017.
  25. ^ London Marathon 2017: Mary Keitany & Daniel Wanjiru win, BBC, 23 April 2017
  26. ^ "Keitany breaks women's-only world record at London Marathon| News | iaaf.org". www.iaaf.org. Retrieved 26 April 2019.
  27. ^ "Mary Keitany kills it again in Beach to Beacon women's race". Press Herald. 5 August 2017. Retrieved 3 May 2018.
  28. ^ "KIPLAGAT LEADS KENYA'S MARATHON SELECTIONS FOR IAAF WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS LONDON 2017". International Association of Athletics Federations. 25 May 2017. Retrieved 11 July 2017.
  29. ^ "2017 Great North Run Results - LetsRun.com". LetsRun.com. 11 September 2017. Retrieved 2 May 2018.
  30. ^ https://www.tcsnycmarathon.org/about-the-race/results/overall-women. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  31. ^ "News". www.leichtathletik.de | Das Leichtathletik-Portal (in German). 26 April 2019. Retrieved 26 April 2019.
  32. ^ http://abc7ny.com/sports/live-%7C-2019-tcs-new-york-city-marathon-jepkosgei-wins-womens-race/5668134/
  33. ^ "Marathon beckons for Keitany – World Half Marathon, Birmingham". IAAF. 11 October 2009. Archived from the original on 13 October 2009.
  34. ^ TCS New York City Marathon Stories Album: Motivated By Motherhood, By Barbara Huebner
  35. ^ Library, World. "Mary Keitany | World Library - eBooks | Read eBooks online". netlibrary.ws. Retrieved 27 April 2017.
  36. ^ "São Silvestre Olivais 10K 2016 Results". joaolima.net. 30 December 2006. Retrieved 25 April 2017.

External links

This page was last edited on 4 November 2019, at 20:16
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