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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Magyar Jelen
TypeBiweekly newspaper
Editor-in-chiefLászló Toroczkai
Founded2003
Political alignmentRadical nationalism
LanguageHungarian
Ceased publication2013
HeadquartersBudapest
Websitehttps://magyarjelen.hu/

Magyar Jelen (meaning Hungarian Present in English) was a radical nationalist biweekly newspaper published in Budapest, Hungary, between 2003 and 2013.

Profile

In 2002 László Toroczkai became the editor of the paper.[1][2]

Magyar Jelen had a radical nationalist[1] and an anti-Semitic stance.[3] Its editor, Toroczkai, published articles in the paper arguing that the Romani and African populations are threats to Hungary.[4]

The online version of Magyar Jelen was restarted in August 2020, after a relative of the owner of the Elemi.hu news portal terminated the access rights of the employees connected to the Our Homeland Movement. László Toroczkai notified the newsletter What our country newsletter recipients on 25 August 2020. The recipients also learned from a newsletter on 28 August 2020 that the Internet version of Magyar Jelen was launched, which follows the spirit of the Our Homeland Movement. According to the imprint of the online Magyar Jelen, the publisher is the Innovative Communication Foundation, which is based in Ásotthalom.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "A special holiday offer for everyone who bought our Jewish-Gypsy onslaught conspiracy". Politics. 27 April 2011. Retrieved 15 November 2014.
  2. ^ "National Portrait Gallery: László Toroczkai". Hungarian Ambiance. 16 June 2009. Retrieved 15 November 2014.
  3. ^ László Molnár (1 November 2010). "Anti-Semitism in Hungary". Jerusalem Center for Public Affairs. Retrieved 15 November 2014.
  4. ^ Manuel Mireanu (29 April 2013). "The Spectacle of Security in the Case of Hungarian". Left East. Retrieved 15 November 2014.

External links

This page was last edited on 10 August 2021, at 18:10
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