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Luzhniki Palace of Sports

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Luzhniki Palace of Sports
Luzhniki-sports-palace.jpg
Former names Palace of Sports of the Central Lenin Stadium (1956–1992)
Location Khamovniki District, Moscow, Russia
Capacity 11,500 (formerly 13,700)
Construction
Opened 1956
Renovated 2002
Website
www.luzhniki.ru

Luzhniki Palace of Sports, formerly the Palace of Sports of the Central Lenin Stadium, is a sports arena in Moscow, Russia, a part of the Luzhniki Olympic Complex. Built in 1956, it originally had a spectator capacity of 13,700. In the past it was the host site of the world and European championships in ice hockey, gymnastics, volleyball, basketball, boxing, and other sports.

It hosted several games during the 1972 Summit Series ice hockey tournament between the Soviet Union and Canada and was a venue for gymnastics and judo events at the 1980 Summer Olympics.[1]

In 2002, the arena experienced a major reconstruction and the seating capacity was lowered to 11,500. The arena subsequently hosted the 2005 World Figure Skating Championships. It was primarily used for ice hockey as the home arena for HC Dynamo Moscow until the year 2000,[2] in which the club moved to Luzhniki Small Sports Arena.[2]

Notable sporting events

Notable concerts

References

  1. ^ 1980 Summer Olympics official report. Archived 2008-11-18 at the Wayback Machine. Volume 2. Part 1. pp. 58–60.
  2. ^ a b Стадион Archived 2009-05-19 at the Wayback Machine. (in Russian)
  3. ^ a b c d e f g History of the palace of the sport Archived 2008-10-22 at the Wayback Machine.(in Russian)

External links

Events and tenants
Preceded by
Unknown venue, Cortina
Sportovní hala, Prague
Sportovní hala, Prague
Sportovní hala, Prague
Ice Hockey World Championships
Venue

1957
1973
1979
1986
Succeeded by
Unknown venue, Oslo
Unknown venue, Helsinki
Scandinavium, Gothenburg
Unknown venue, Vienna
Preceded by
Centennial Hall
Wrocław
Eurobasket
Final venue

1965
Succeeded by
Helsinki Ice Hall
Helsinki
Preceded by
Palacio de Deportes
Granada
UEFA Futsal Championship
Final Venue

2001
Succeeded by
PalaMaggiò
Caserta
This page was last edited on 8 May 2018, at 07:51
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