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Louise Allbritton

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Louise Allbritton
Louise Allbritton CM744.jpg
Allbritton in 1944
Born(1920-07-03)July 3, 1920
DiedFebruary 16, 1979(1979-02-16) (aged 58)
Other namesLouise Albritton
Alma materUniversity of Oklahoma
OccupationActress
Years active1942–1964
Spouse(s)
(m. 1946)

Louise Allbritton (July 3, 1920 – February 16, 1979) was an American film and stage actress born in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Her name was sometimes seen as Louise Albritton.[1]

She played in such films as Pittsburgh (1942), Who Done It? (1942), Son of Dracula (1943), The Egg and I (1947), and Sitting Pretty (1948).[2]

Early life and career

Allbritton was born in Oklahoma City on July 3, 1920, the daughter of E.E. Allbritton of Wichita Falls, Texas.[3] She attended the University of Oklahoma and gained acting experience in the Pasadena Playhouse.[4] Her father cut off her allowance in hopes that she would return home, but her contract with Universal Studios enabled her to continue in Hollywood.[3]

During World War II, Allbritton performed overseas with a USO troupe, a group that "[g]ave show after show, many of them to the accompaniment of the thunder of enemy guns."[5]

Allbritton (right) and Milton R. Krasner on the set of The Egg and I (1947)
Allbritton (right) and Milton R. Krasner on the set of The Egg and I (1947)

She was one of several replacements for the leading female role in the long-running Broadway production of The Seven Year Itch.[6] On television, she played the title role in the NBC-TV series Concerning Miss Marlowe (1954)[7] and co-starred in the CBS drama Stage Door (1950).[7]: 1008 

Personal life

1943 portrait of Allbritton's husband Charles Collingwood by Henry Carr
1943 portrait of Allbritton's husband Charles Collingwood by Henry Carr

She was married to CBS news correspondent and author Charles Collingwood from 1946 until her death[1] and retired several years after their marriage.[4]

Death

Allbritton died of cancer on February 16, 1979, in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, where she and Collingwood had one of their homes.[8]

Complete filmography

Radio appearances

Year Program Episode/source
1943 Lady Esther Screen Guild Theatre Men in White[9]
1944 Lady Esther Screen Guild Theatre Phantom Lady[9]

References

  1. ^ a b Monush, Barry (2003). "Louise Allbritton". The Encyclopedia of Film Actors from the Silent Era to 1965. Vol. 1. New York City: Applause Theatre and Cinema Books. p. 8. ISBN 9781557835512. Retrieved December 19, 2014.
  2. ^ "America's Best-Dressed Women Named By Fashion Group; Six Are Newcomers". The Tampa Times. Florida, Tampa. Associated Press. March 21, 1947. p. 1. Retrieved March 22, 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  3. ^ a b "Wants to Show Dad". Amarillo Daily News. August 14, 1942. p. 6. Retrieved May 27, 2015 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  4. ^ a b Katz, Ephraim (1979). The Film Encyclopedia: The Most Comprehensive Encyclopedia of World Cinema in a Single Volume. Perigee Books. ISBN 0-399-50601-2. P.20.
  5. ^ "(Naugatuck War Fund ad)". The Centralia Enterprise and Tribune. November 8, 1944. p. 5. Retrieved May 27, 2015 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  6. ^ "To Be Featured on New TV Show." Picket Line Post & Mount Morris (NY) Union, 15 July 1954.
  7. ^ a b Terrace, Vincent (2011). Encyclopedia of Television Shows, 1925 through 2010 (2nd ed.). Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers. p. 206. ISBN 978-0-7864-6477-7.
  8. ^ "Louise Allbritton dead at 59". The Milwaukee Sentinel. February 17, 1979. p. Part 2-Page 28. Retrieved May 27, 2015.
  9. ^ a b "Abel, Walter". radioGOLDINdex. Retrieved May 26, 2015.

External links

This page was last edited on 22 April 2022, at 11:56
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