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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Figure skating element
Element name:Loop Jump
Alternative name:Rittberger Jump
Scoring abbreviation:Lo
Element type:Jump
Take-off edge:Back Outside
Landing edge:Back Outside
Inventor:Werner Rittberger

The loop jump is an edge jump in the sport of figure skating. It was created by German figure skater Werner Rittberger, and is often called the Rittberger in Europe. It also gets its name from the shape the blade would leave on the ice if the skater performed the rotation without leaving the ice. The skater executes it by taking off from the back outside edge of the skating foot, turning one rotation in the air, and landing on the back outside edge of the same foot. It is often performed as the second jump in a combination.

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  • ✪ HOW TO DO A LOOP JUMP | FIGURE SKATING ❄️❄️
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  • ✪ Adult Figure Skating Journey - Loop Jump Progression

Transcription

Contents

History

The loop jump is an edge jump in the sport of figure skating. It was created by German figure skater Werner Rittberger, and is often called the Rittberger in Europe.[1][2] According to U.S. Figure Skating, the loop jump is "the most fundamental of all the jumps".[3] According to writer Ellyn Kestnbaum, the jump also gets its name from the shape the blade would leave on the ice if the skater performed the rotation without leaving the ice.[4] In competitions, the base value of the single loop jump is 0.50; the base value of a double loop is 1.70; the base value of a triple loop is 4.90; and the base value of a quadruple loop is 10.50.[5]

Firsts

Russian figure skater Evgeni Plushenko (2005)
Russian figure skater Evgeni Plushenko (2005)

The first triple loop was completed by American Dick Button during the 1952 Winter Olympics.[6] The first woman to perform a triple loop was Gabriele Seyfert, from East Germany, in 1968.[1] Russian skater Evgeni Plushenko was the first to complete a loop jump in combination, a double loop, with a quadruple toe loop and a triple toe loop, at the 1999 NHK Trophy. Plushenko was also the first to complete a triple loop jump in combination, with a quadruple toe loop and a triple toe loop, at the Cup of Russia in 2002. [7] Yuzuru Hanyu from Japan was the first skater to complete the quadruple loop, at the Autumn Classic International in 2016.[8]

Execution

The loop jump is an edge jump.[9][10] The skater executes it by taking off from the back outside edge of the skating foot, turning one rotation in the air, and landing on the back outside edge of the same foot.[11] Atlantic Monthly, in its description of all jumps, states, "An easy way to remember this jump is that it's basically a toe loop without the assist of the toe pick".[9] The jump is usually approached directly from back crossovers, which allows the skater to establish his or her upper body position while gliding backwards on his or her right outside edge before springing into the air. The loop is more difficult than the toe loop and salchow because the free leg is already crossed at takeoff, so the rotation is begun from the edge of the skating foot and the upper body. The coordination and weight shift does not need to be exact while performing the loop, so many skaters consider it an easier jump than the flip and lutz.[4] It is often performed as the second jump in a combination because it takes off from the same edge as "the standard jump landing".[4] Kestnbaum states, "The fact that the free leg remains in front makes both controlling the landing of the first jump and generating the lift and rotation for the second more difficult than when a toe loop is used as the second jump".[4] A loop jump is considered incorrectly done if the takeoff is two-footed, meaning that the free foot does not leave the ice before the takeoff.[4]

References

  1. ^ a b Media Guide, p. 13
  2. ^ Hines, James R. (2011). Historical Dictionary of Figure Skating. Lanham, Maryland: Scarecrow Press. p. 150. ISBN 978-0-8108-6859-5.
  3. ^ "Identifying Jumps" (PDF). U.S. Figure Skating. p. 2. Retrieved 15 February 2019.
  4. ^ a b c d e Kestnbaum, p. 285
  5. ^ "Communication No. 2168: Single & Pair Skating". Lausanne, Switzerland: International Skating Union. 23 May 2018. p. 2. Retrieved 15 May 2019.
  6. ^ Pucin, Diane (7 January 2002). "Button Has Never Been Known to Zip His Lip". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 20 May 2019.
  7. ^ Media Guide, p. 14
  8. ^ "Hanyu first to nail quadruple loop". The Japan Times. Kyodo News. 1 October 2016. ISSN 0447-5763.
  9. ^ a b Abad-Santos, Alexander (5 February 2014). "A GIF Guide to Figure Skaters' Jumps at the Olympics". The Atlantic Monthly. Retrieved 24 May 2019.
  10. ^ Kestnbaum, p. 284
  11. ^ "Skating Glossary". Skate Canada. 2015. Retrieved 24 May 2019.

Works cited

This page was last edited on 8 October 2019, at 05:04
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