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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Long March 4B
CZ-4B.svg
Long March 4B
FunctionLaunch vehicle
ManufacturerSAST
Country of originChina
Cost per launchUS$50 million (2006) [1]
Size
Height44.1 m (145 ft)[1]
Diameter3.35 m (11.0 ft)[2]
Mass249,200 kg (549,400 lb)[2]
Stages3
Capacity
Payload to LEO
Mass4,200 kg (9,300 lb)[3]
Payload to SSO
Mass2,800 kg (6,200 lb)[3]
Payload to GTO
Mass1,500 kg (3,300 lb)[3]
Associated rockets
FamilyLong March
DerivativesLong March 4C
Launch history
StatusActive
Launch sites
Total launches40
Success(es)39
Failure(s)1
First flight10 May 1999
Last flight27 September 2020
First stage
Length27.91 m
Diameter3.35 m
Propellant mass182,000 kg (401,000 lb)
Engines4 YF-21C
Thrust2,961.6 kN (665,800 lbf)
Specific impulse2,550 m/s (8,400 ft/s)
FuelN2O4 / UDMH
Second stage
Length10.9 m
Diameter3.35 m
Propellant mass52,700 kg (116,200 lb)
Engines1 YF-24C
(1 x YF-22C (Main))
(4 x YF-23C (Vernier))
Thrust742.04 kN (166,820 lbf) (Main)
47.1 kN (10,600 lbf) (Vernier)
Specific impulse2,942 m/s (9,650 ft/s) (Main)
2,834 m/s (9,300 ft/s) (Vernier)
FuelN2O4 / UDMH
Third stage
Length14.79 m
Diameter2.9 m
Propellant mass14,000 kg (31,000 lb)
Engines2 YF-40
Thrust100.85 kN (22,670 lbf)
Specific impulse2,971 m/s (9,750 ft/s)
FuelN2O4 / UDMH

The Long March 4B (Chinese: 长征四号乙火箭), also known as the Chang Zheng 4B, CZ-4B and LM-4B is a Chinese orbital Launch vehicle. Launched from Launch Complex 1 at the Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center, it is a 3-stage rocket, used mostly to place satellites into low Earth orbit and sun-synchronous orbits. It was first launched on 10 May 1999, with the FY-1C weather satellite, which would later be used in the 2007 Chinese anti-satellite missile test.

The Chang Zheng 4B experienced its only launch failure on 9 December 2013, with the loss of the CBERS-3 satellite.[4]

List of launches

Flight
number
Date and time
(UTC)
Launch site Payload Orbit Result
1 10 May 1999
01:33
Taiyuan
LA-7
Fengyun 1C
Shijian 5
SSO Success
2 14 October 1999
03:15
Taiyuan
LA-7
CBERS-1
SACI-1
SSO Success
3 1 September 2000
03:25
Taiyuan
LA-7
Ziyuan II-01 SSO Success
4 15 May 2002
01:50
Taiyuan
LA-7
Fengyun 1D
HaiYang-1A
SSO Success
5 27 October 2002
03:17
Taiyuan
LA-7
Ziyuan II-02 SSO Success
6 21 October 2003
03:16
Taiyuan
LA-7
CBERS-2
Chuangxin 1-01
SSO Success
7 8 September 2004
23:14
Taiyuan
LA-7
Shijian 6A
Shijian 6B
SSO Success
8 6 November 2004
03:10
Taiyuan
LA-7
Ziyuan II-03 SSO Success
9 23 October 2006
23:34
Taiyuan
LA-7
Shijian 6C
Shijian 6D
SSO Success
10 19 September 2007
03:26
Taiyuan
LA-7
CBERS-2B SSO Success
11 25 October 2008
01:15
Taiyuan
LA-9
Shijian 6E
Shijian 6F
SSO Success
12 15 December 2008
03:22
Taiyuan
LA-9
Yaogan 5 SSO Success
13 6 October 2010
00:49
Taiyuan
LA-9
Shijian 6G
Shijian 6H
SSO Success
14 15 August 2011
22:57
Taiyuan
LA-9
HaiYang-2A SSO Success
15 9 November 2011
03:21
Taiyuan
LA-9
Yaogan 12
Tianxun 1
SSO Success
16 22 December 2011
03:26
Taiyuan
LA-9
Ziyuan I-02C SSO Success
17 9 January 2012
03:17
Taiyuan
LA-9
Ziyuan 3-01
VesselSat-2
SSO Success
18 10 May 2012
07:06
Taiyuan
LA-9
Yaogan 14
Tiantuo 1
SSO Success
19 25 October 2013
03:50
Jiuquan
LA-4/SLS-2
Shijian 16-01 LEO Success
20 9 December 2013
03:26
Taiyuan
LA-9
CBERS-3 SSO Failure
One of the two third-stage engines shut down prematurely, so that the satellite failed to reach orbit. The cause was traced to foreign debris that blocked the engine's fuel intake.[5]
21 19 August 2014
03:15
Taiyuan
LA-9
Gaofen 2
BRITE-PL2 (Heweliusz)
SSO Success
22 8 September 2014
03:22
Taiyuan
LA-9
Yaogan 21
Tiantuo 2
SSO Success
23 7 December 2014
03:26
Taiyuan
LA-9
CBERS-4 SSO Success
24 27 December 2014
03:22
Taiyuan
LA-9
Yaogan 26 SSO Success
25 26 June 2015
06:22
Taiyuan
LA-9
Gaofen 8 SSO Success
26 8 November 2015
07:06
Taiyuan
LA-9
Yaogan 28 SSO Success
27 30 May 2016
03:17
Taiyuan
LA-9
Ziyuan 3-02
ÑuSat-1/-2
SSO Success
28 29 June 2016
03:21
Jiuquan
LA-4/SLS-2
Shijian 16-02 LEO Success
29 15 June 2017
03:00
Jiuquan
LA-4/SLS-2
HXMT
ÑuSat-3
Zhuhai-1
LEO Success
30 31 July 2018
03:00
Taiyuan
LA-9
Gaofen 11-01 SSO Success
31 24 October 2018
22:57
Taiyuan
LA-9
Haiyang-2B SSO Success[6]
32 29 April 2019
22:52
Taiyuan
LA-9
Tianhui-2-01 A/B SSO Success
33 12 September 2019
03:26
Taiyuan
LA-9
Ziyuan I-02D SSO Success
34 3 November 2019
03:22
Taiyuan
LA-9
Gaofen 7
Xiaoxiang 1-08
SSO Success
35 20 December 2019
03:22
Taiyuan
LA-9
CBERS-4A
ETRSS-1
SSO Success
36 3 July 2020
03:10
Taiyuan
LA-9
Gaofen Multi-Mode
BY-70-2
SSO Success
37 25 July 2020
03:13
Taiyuan
LA-9
Ziyuan 3-03
Tianqi 10
NJU-HKU 1
SSO Success
38 7 September 2020
05:57
Taiyuan
LA-9
Gaofen 11-02 SSO Success
A booster presumably coming from this launch fell near populated areas.[7]
39 21 September 2020
05:40
Jiuquan
LA-4/SLS-2
Haiyang-2C LEO Success
40 27 September 2020
03:23
Taiyuan
LA-9
Huanjing-2A
Huanjing-2B
SSO Success
Source: Gunter's Space Page[8]

References

  1. ^ Brian Harvey (2013). China in Space: The Great Leap Forward. Springer Science & Business Media. p. 96. ISBN 978-1-4614-5043-6.
  2. ^ a b Mark Wade. "CZ-4B". Encyclopedia Astronautica. Archived from the original on 21 March 2008. Retrieved 27 April 2008.
  3. ^ a b c Gunter Krebs. "Long March-4B". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 27 April 2008.
  4. ^ Boadle, Anthony. "China-Brazil satellite launch fails, likely fell back to Earth". Reuters. Retrieved 10 December 2013.
  5. ^ de Selding, Peter B. (3 March 2014). "China Great Wall Pins December Long March Launch Failure on Fuel-line Clog". SpaceNews. Retrieved 10 August 2015.
  6. ^ Barbosa, Rui C. (24 October 2018). "Chinese Long March 4B lofts Haiyang-2B". NASASpaceFlight.com. Retrieved 24 October 2018.
  7. ^ Jones, Andrew (7 September 2020). "Chinese rocket booster appears to crash near school during Gaofen 11 satellite launch". Space.com. Retrieved 7 September 2020.
  8. ^ Krebs, Gunter. "CZ-4B (Chang Zheng-4B)". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 25 October 2018.
This page was last edited on 28 December 2020, at 07:27
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