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London Film Company

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The London Film Company was a British film production company active during the silent era. Founded in 1913, the company emerged as one of the dominant forces in production during the First World War. With strong financial backing the company constructed the Twickenham Studios, then the largest in Britain, and began production of features, which were then were displacing short films as the dominant form. Two of the company's key early directors were Americans: Harold Shaw and George Loane Tucker.[1] Later, British director Maurice Elvey made a number of films for the studio.[2]

By 1915, a number of ambitious productions such as The Prisoner of Zenda and its sequel Rupert of Hentzau were attempted. However, that same year the studio had 130 employees whose wage bill was estimated to be £750 a week and it suffered heavy financial losses.[3] The following year was more promising, with the release of The Manxman enjoying success in Britain and America. Unfortunately, Tucker and Shaw both departed to work in other countries and production ground to a halt. For the remainder of the war, the Twickenham Studios were rented out for other companies to shoot there.[4]

The company briefly revived after end of the war, and in 1920 it released nine films. This was the final year of operation before London Film withdrew from production completely and Twickenham was sold off.

Filmography

References

  1. ^ Low p.75
  2. ^ Low p.77
  3. ^ Low p.76
  4. ^ Low p.78

Bibliography

  • Low, Rachael. The History of the British Film: 1906-1914. Allen & Unwin, 1973.
This page was last edited on 8 September 2019, at 07:34
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