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List of third party performances in United States House elections

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

This is a list of notable performances of third party and independent candidates in elections to the United States House of Representatives. It is rare for candidates, other than those of the six parties which have succeeded as major parties (Federalist Party, Democratic-Republican Party, National Republican Party, Democratic Party, Whig Party, Republican Party), to take large shares of the vote in elections.

Listed below are sets of House elections in which a third party or independent candidate won or were reasonably close to receiving 5.0% of the vote (greater than 4.95%). Winners are shown in bold. In some of the listed cases a faction or factions of a state's major party ran against each other, often making it difficult to ascertain which was the mainline candidate and which was the bolter; in such cases, those candidates which are not listed on a standard major party line are still listed, but are not considered traditional third party victories as often these candidates sat in Congress as affiliated party members (barring cases like Joe Lieberman who, upon winning re-election in 2006 as a third party candidate, sat as an Independent Democrat).

1828–1829

1850–1851

1852–1853

1854–1855

1856–1857

1858–1859

1920–1921

2006

2008

2010

2012

2014

2016

2018

2020

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am Affiliation is actually not known.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q Faction of the Democratic Party supportive of Senator Thomas Hart Benton and part of the Anti-Nebraska movement.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g Faction of the Democratic Party opposed to Senator Thomas Hart Benton.
  4. ^ a b Faction of the California Democratic Party supportive of Senator David C. Broderick.
  5. ^ a b c Early forerunner of the Prohibition Party.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z Faction of the New York Democratic Party opposing reconciliation between the Democratic Party and Barnburner Democrats (who had defected in 1848 to support the Free Soil Party).
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa Faction of the New York Democratic Party which favored reconciliation between the Democratic Party and Barnburner Democrats (who had defected in 1848 to support the Free Soil Party).
  8. ^ Died before he could take office.
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v The Union Party in Pennsylvania was a coalition of Republicans, Americans, Whigs and Democrats opposed to the local Democratic Party and its favorite son (and national party Presidential nominee) James Buchanan, in an effort to prevent vote splitting between those parties involved.
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x Virtually identical to the Union slate that ran in 1856, it was a coalition of Republicans, Americans, Whigs and Democrats who were opposed to the Lecompton Constitution, in opposition to the local Democratic Party that had largely endorsed it, in an effort to prevent vote splitting between those parties involved.
  11. ^ Similar to the Pennsylvania People's slate, it was a coalition of Republicans, Americans, Whigs and Democrats who were opposed to the Lecompton Constitution, in opposition to the local Democratic Party that had largely endorsed it, in an effort to prevent vote splitting between those parties involved.
  12. ^ a b c d Like Anti-Lecompton Democrats, Anti-Administration Democrats were those opposed generally opposed to the adopted policy of the national Democratic Party as well as the Buchanan Presidency.
  13. ^ On ballot as "The People's Candidate."
  14. ^ Include 1 special election in 2007.
  15. ^ A special election and general election were held the same day. While write-in candidate Shelley Sekula-Gibbs came in 2nd place in the general election, she is not listed here because of her status as the de facto Republican nominee.
  16. ^ Include 3 special elections in 2009.
  17. ^ Include 1 special election in 2011.
  18. ^ Fitzpatrick, Alex (May 31, 2012). "Candidate Changes Legal Name to 'VoteForEddie.com". Mashable.com. Retrieved March 31, 2013..
  19. ^ Marso., Andy (July 23, 2012). "House hopeful changes name to Thomas Jefferson". The Topeka Capital-Journal. Retrieved October 6, 2012..
  20. ^ Include 2 special elections in 2017.
  21. ^ Listed on ballot as "People's Choice."
  22. ^ Include 1 special election.
  23. ^ a b Also listed as the de facto Democratic nominee.
  24. ^ Lost bid for the Democratic renomination. Listed on ballot as the de facto Working Families nominee.
  25. ^ Co-nominated by Pacific Green Party and Oregon Progressive Party.
  26. ^ Died before election.
This page was last edited on 7 February 2021, at 03:05
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