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List of rabbis

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

This is a list of prominent rabbis. Rabbis are Judaism's spiritual and religious leaders.

See also: List of Jews.

Pre-Mishnaic (Tannaim) (Zugot) (ca. 515 BCE – 70 CE)

Zugot

Other

Mishnaic (Tannaim) (ca. 70–200 CE)

Talmudic (Amoraim) (ca. 200–500 CE)

Middle Ages (ca. 500–1500 CE)

Abudarham. David ben Yosef ben David (née Elbaz). Rishon rabbi in Seville, Spain, in 14th century. Authored the Sefer Abudarham on explanation of Sefardi liturgy and customs. Completed c. 1339

16th century

17th centuries

18th century

Orthodox rabbis

19th century

20th century

Religious-Zionist

Haredi

Modern Orthodox

Contemporary (ca. 21st century)

Religious-Zionist

Haredi

Modern Orthodox

Conservative

19th century

20th century

Contemporary (ca. 21st century)

Union for Traditional Judaism

Reform

19th century

20th century

Contemporary (ca. 21st century)

  • Rachel Adler, theologian and Hebrew Union College professor
  • Arik Ascherman, American-born Reform rabbi and human rights activist for both Jews and non-Jews in Israel-best known for advocating for Palestinian human rights.
  • Rebecca Dubowe, first deaf woman to be ordained as a rabbi in the United States
  • Denise Eger, former rabbi of Beth Chayim Chadashim (world's first LGBT Synagogue) and founder of Temple Kol Ami in West Hollywood, first female and open lesbian to serve as president of Southern California Board of Rabbis, officiated at the first legal same-sex wedding of two women in California
  • Lisa Goldstein, Executive Director of the Institute for Jewish Spirituality
  • Dana Evan Kaplan, rabbi at Temple Beth Shalom in Sun City, Arizona; author of The New Reform Judaism: Challenges and Reflections, the most current modern scholarly analysis of contemporary Reform Judaism
  • Alysa Stanton, first ordained Black female rabbi (Reform) in America
  • Margaret Wenig, rabbi known for advocating for LGBT rights

Reconstructionists

20th century

Contemporary (ca. 21st century)

Karaite rabbis

Other rabbis

See also

References

  1. ^ "Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik as Philosopher". Spertus, Institute for Jewish Learning and Leadership. February 16, 2014. This conference situated Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik, the great American Talmudist and Modern Orthodox leader, within the tradition of Western philosophy that includes ancient, medieval, and modern figures, ranging from Aristotle to Maimonides to Kant.
  2. ^ Ain, Stewart (January 14, 2001). "Nassau Plans to Tax Parsonages". The New York Times. Rockville Centre (NY); Nassau County (NY). Retrieved July 29, 2010.
  3. ^ New York Times obituary, July 23, 1986.
  4. ^ "Black Rabbi Reaches Out to Mainstream of His Faith", Nikko Kopel, New York Times, March 16, 2008
  5. ^ "Home".

External links

Orthodox

Conservative

Reform

Reconstructionist

Pan-denominational

This page was last edited on 21 July 2021, at 08:30
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