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List of ports in the United States

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 Top 25 water ports by tonnage
Top 25 water ports by tonnage

That is a list of ports of the United States, ranked by tonnage.[1] See the articles on individual ports for more information, including geography, ownership, and link to official website.

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  • The 10 Deadliest Mass Shootings In The USA
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Transcription

Welcome to Top10Archive! We'd like to deviate from our typical intro for a moment to offer our sincerest and deepest sympathies to the families left scarred by these incidents, the 10 deadliest shootings in the United States. 10. Century Movie Theater - Aurora, Colorado While trying to enjoy a midnight screening of The Dark Knight, a theater filled with people came under fire by former University of Colorado Anschutz PH.D. student, James Holmes. Holmes' attack on the theater started with canisters of tear gas and ended in gunfire from an unusual assortment of firearms including a Smith & Wesson M&P15 rifle. By the time Holmes ceased his assault and returned to his vehicle, he had inflicted record damage, injuring 70 and killing 12. Allegedly prior to the attack, the gunman had attempted to seek help via a mental health hotline but was unable to connect with an operator. During his trial, Holmes' psychiatrist testified that her patient had admitted having frequent homicidal thoughts and even warned his mother of his condition. Holmes attempted a plea of not guilty by reason of insanity but was given 12 consecutive life sentences and 3,318 years without parole. 9. Columbine High School - Littleton, Colorado It was the shooting that rocked America and turned a normal day in April of 1999 into a nightmare. High school students Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold of Littleton, Colorado entered Columbine High School just after 11am and placed two explosive-filled duffle bags in the cafeteria. When their initial plan to blow up a portion of the school ultimately failed, the psychotic duo brandished firearms, returned to the school, and opened fire on students and teachers. The unhinged pair claimed 13 lives and injured 24 before turning their weapons on themselves, leaving behind a blood-soaked legacy that devastated unsuspecting families. While trying to determine why the two went on their spree and spent a year planning it, investigators took a hard look at several things, including their taste in video games. Ultimately, it was determined that Harris was a bona fide psychopath while Klebold was suicidal and depressive, which lent to the toxic friendship. 8. Edmond Post Office - Edmond, Oklahoma Postal worker Patrick H. Sherrill wasn't a stable man to begin with, but tack on issues he had with USPS management, a fascination with firearms, and a desire for revenge and you have the recipe that lead to the August 20th, 1986 murders of 14 of his coworkers. After being reprimanded the day prior, Sherrill decided to act upon his numerous threats of revenge, arrived to work with semi-automatic pistols, and unleashed his rage before killing himself. The disturbed man's rampage was one of 15 reported postal employee homicides between 1986 and 1999 and makes up just under half of the total victims in that time period. 7. Inland Regional Center – San Bernardino, CA Fourteen people were tragically killed during a December 2nd, 2015 attack on the Inland Regional Center in San Bernardino, California. Carried out by Syed Rizwan Farook and Tashfeen Malik, the attack was later deemed by the FBI a terrorist attack perpetrated by "homegrown violent extremists" inspired by foreign terrorism. The attack, which was meant to end with a deadly bombing, took place during a San Bernardino County Department of Public Health training event and Christmas Party, likely chosen due to the larger number of people that would be present. After 14 were needlessly killed, and an additional 21 people injured, the married couple were gunned down by local law enforcement after attempting to escape in an SUV. After the attack, a former neighbor and Farook's brother and sister-in-law were arrested in connection to the shooting. 6. University of Texas Tower - Austin, Texas August 1st, 1966 was a rather different kind of day for University of Texas engineering student Charles Joseph Whitman, who decided to forego his morning routine to go on a rampage shooting spree. Starting by killing his wife and his mother, Whitman ended up shooting a total of 49 people from the University of Texas Tower, resulting in 15 deaths, including an unborn child, and 31 injuries. Plagued by what he described in his suicide letter as "irrational thoughts," Whitman claimed to have killed his family members to release them from suffering and, according to the suicide note, requested that his body be autopsied to determine if his actions were biological in nature. Over the course of 5 city blocks, Whitman left a trail of terror so shocking that it contended with the Vietnam War for the public's attention. 5. McDonald's - San Ysidro, California The unsuspecting town of San Ysidro, California was met with tragedy on July 18th, 1984 when 41-year-old James Huberty opened fire in a McDonald's, killing 21 people and injuring 19. Days leading up to the shooting, Huberty suspected he was having mental issues, a claim he made to his wife just before attempting to make an appointment with a mental health clinic. Deemed a non-crisis by the receptionist due to his calm demeanor on the phone, the man's case was to be handled within 48-hours - a decision that inadvertently pushed him over the edge. Believing even society had failed him in his time of need, Huberty gave up, kissed his wife goodbye, and told her he was going, "hunting humans." Shortly after he left, Huberty walked into a crowded McDonald's restaurant and commenced a 77-minute killing spree before being killed by a SWAT sniper. 4. Luby's Cafeteria - Killeen, Texas Within a matter of 13 crawling minutes, former Merchant Marine George Hennard entered Luby's Cafeteria in Killeen, Texas and took the lives of 23 people and wounding another 20 before turning the gun on himself. Known for being combative and cold, those that knew Hennard expected him to have a darker side, just not one corrupt enough to execute such a tragedy. After being honorably discharged from the U.S. Navy and removed from the Merchant Marines for possession of marijuana, Hennard wasn't left with many options, especially after his ability to work at sea was stripped after being caught a second time with marijuana. In 1991, the former seaman made a failed attempt to regain the ability to work at sea, leaving him embittered and seeking revenge. On October 16th of the same year, Hennard crashed his truck into Luby's during the lunch rush and opened fire. 3. Sandy Hook Elementary School - Newtown, Connecticut One of the more heinous shooting sprees on this list, the Sandy hook Elementary School shooting that claimed the lives of 20 children and 6 adults devastated the nation. The swine behind the December 2012 tragedy, 20-year-old Adam Lanza started his killing spree closer to home, shooting and killing his mother before setting his sights on the school. The investigation that followed provided the families of the victims no solace as a motive for Lanza's crime was never determined, though his mental health, which included a possible onset of schizophrenia misdiagnosed as Asperger's, and fascination with mass shootings, including the 1999 Columbine High School massacre, were called into question. An answer may never be found, however, as Lanza killed himself as first responders started arriving at the elementary school. In 2013, the school was demolished and made way for a new institution that opened its doors in August of 2016. 2. Virginia Tech - Blacksburg, Virginia The campus of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University is not a site one would ever expect to breed disaster, but on April 16th, 2007, student Cho Seung Hui brought down a dark cloud over the school. The troubled killer behind the massacre was diagnosed at a young age with major depressive disorder and anxiety disorders and was known for being a loner and leaning his assignments towards a dark, morbid tone. On the day of the shooting, Cho had mailed a rather telling manifesto to the New York headquarters of NBC, explaining the reasons behind the shooting. Before turning the gun on himself, Cho gunned down 49 students and teachers, killing 32. 1. Pulse Nightclub - Orlando, Florida After the death of the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) leader Shaker Wahib al-Fahdawi al-Dulaimi, 29-year-old Omar Mateen sought a means to act out against those he believed responsible - the United States of America. On June 12th, 2016, the ISIL sympathizer walked into Pulse Nightclub in Orlando, Florida brandishing a SIG Sauer MCX and 9mm Glock 17 and opened fire. During the shooting, Mateen took several measures to ensure he and ISIL received credit, even calling 9-1-1 and pledging allegiance to ISIL leader, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi. The shooter was able to kill 49 and wounded an additional 53 people within the club before Orlando police officers breached the club and shot him 8 times, killing him. Mateen had no known connection with ISIL or ISIS but did demand negotiators to "tell America to stop bombing Syria and Iraq."

Contents

List by 2013 figures

Cargo volume at U.S. ports, 2013, short tons.[2]
Rank
(by total trade)
Port name State Total trade Foreign imports Foreign exports Foreign total Domestic total
1 Port of South Louisiana Louisiana 238,585,604 38,247,047 73,487,319 111,734,366 126,851,238
2 Port of Houston Texas 229,246,833 76,448,532 83,102,459 159,550,991 69,695,842
3 Port of New York and New Jersey
Port Newark
New York
New Jersey
123,322,644 56,144,985 20,461,245 76,606,230 46,716,414
4 Port of Beaumont Texas 94,403,631 48,544,096 12,488,386 61,032,482 33,371,149
5 Port of Long Beach California 84,492,739 46,019,573 27,652,598 73,672,171 10,820,568
6 Port of Hampton Roads Virginia 78,664,496 9,671,323 61,673,749 71,345,072 7,319,424
7 Port of New Orleans Louisiana 77,159,081 15,413,666 18,588,978 34,002,644 43,156,437
8 Port of Corpus Christi Texas 76,157,693 28,469,897 15,776,788 44,246,685 31,911,008
9 Port of Greater Baton Rouge Louisiana 63,875,439 14,429,910 10,713,197 25,143,107 38,732,332
10 Port of Los Angeles California 57,928,594 31,506,185 20,499,092 52,005,277 5,923,317
11 Plaquemines Port Louisiana 58,280,348 1,668,182 22,974,084 24,642,266 33,638,082
12 Port of Lake Charles Louisiana 56,577,328 22,124,549 8,960,143 31,084,692 25,492,636
13 Port of Mobile Alabama 53,992,615 12,493,015 18,178,382 30,671,397 23,321,218
14 Port of Texas City Texas 49,674,036 18,977,066 11,415,009 30,392,075 19,281,961
15 Port of Huntington-Tristate West Virginia 46,831,097 46,831,097
16 Port of Baltimore Maryland 36,578,828 10,645,458 19,347,371 29,992,829 6,585,999
17 Twin Ports of Duluth and Superior Minnesota
Wisconsin
36,477,257 659,886 7,087,895 7,747,781 28,729,476
18 Port of Port Arthur Texas 34,699,150 9,652,814 15,506,956 25,159,770 9,539,380
19 Port of St. Louis and East St. Louis Missouri
Illinois
33,574,650 33,574,650
20 Port of Pittsburgh Pennsylvania 32,746,315 32,746,315
21 Pascagoula Mississippi 32,427,863 16,445,106 7,660,249 24,105,355 8,322,508
22 Port of Tampa Bay Florida 32,406,550 5,764,600 4,940,136 10,704,736 21,701,814
23 Port of Savannah Georgia 31,990,023 13,340,970 16,892,830 30,233,800 1,756,223
24 Valdez Alaska 28,165,948 2,626 2,626 28,163,322
25 Port of Philadelphia Pennsylvania 26,046,318 13,969,775 888,169 14,857,944 11,188,374
26 Port of Richmond California 23,544,415 11,239,776 2,865,906 14,105,682 9,438,733
27 Port of Portland Oregon 23,427,235 3,545,488 11,490,879 15,036,367 8,390,868
28 Port of Tacoma Washington 22,905,704 7,272,236 11,121,702 18,393,938 4,511,766
29 Port Everglades Florida 21,702,940 8,329,969 3,520,011 11,849,980 9,852,960
30 Port of Seattle Washington 20,563,501 7,230,803 7,593,548 14,824,351 5,739,150
31 Port of Freeport Texas 19,716,053 10,511,562 1,973,680 12,485,242 7,230,811
32 Port of Oakland California 19,333,479 6,324,189 10,215,970 16,540,159 2,793,320
33 Port of Paulsboro New Jersey 19,122,088 9,599,779 2,422,011 12,021,790 7,100,298
34 Port of Charleston South Carolina 18,525,276 9,580,355 6,913,836 16,494,191 2,031,085
35 Port of Boston Massachusetts 17,087,802 9,982,605 1,442,311 11,424,916 5,662,886
36 Two Harbors Minnesota 16,709,479 129,978 129,978 16,579,501
37 Port of Jacksonville Florida 16,471,608 7,309,991 2,416,943 9,726,934 6,744,674
38 Port of Chicago Illinois 15,428,892 1,475,235 90,790 1,566,025 13,862,867
39 Port of Honolulu Hawaii 14,274,405 1,181,665 189,717 1,371,382 12,903,023
40 Port of Memphis Tennessee 14,243,251 14,243,251
41 Port of Longview Washington 13,712,139 986,463 10,260,448 11,246,911 2,465,228
42 Port of Detroit Michigan 12,981,468 2,222,427 103,008 2,325,435 10,656,033
43 Port of Indiana-Burns Harbor Indiana 12,354,161 303,902 0 303,902 12,050,259
44 Port of Portland Maine 12,039,600 11,039,596 69,819 11,109,415 930,185
45 Marcus Hook Pennsylvania 11,925,449 5,307,394 291,828 5,599,222 6,326,227
46 Cincinnati Ohio 11,682,473 11,682,473
47 Port of Cleveland Ohio 11,454,092 1,459,648 68,657 1,528,305 9,925,787
48 Port of Galveston Texas 11,406,750 1,620,851 2,665,026 4,285,877 7,120,873
49 Port of Albany–Rensselaer New York 11,021,185 585,778 429,535 1,015,313 10,005,872
50 Port of Port Lavaca – Point Comfort Texas 10,888,384 5,223,082 2,501,123 7,724,205 3,164,179
51 Port of San Juan Puerto Rico 10,451,925 5,880,262 345,443 6,225,705 4,226,220
52 Anacortes Washington 9,889,028 526,383 2,370,881 2,897,264 6,991,764
53 Kalama Washington 9,785,826 486,470 8,116,710 8,603,180 1,182,646
54 Port of Toledo Ohio 8,836,985 3,041,967 1,716,974 4,758,941 4,078,044
55 Barbers Point Hawaii 8,669,252 6,575,240 235,404 6,810,644 1,860,312
56 Buffington Harbor Indiana 8,878,052 147,323 147,323 8,521,929
57 New Haven Harbor Connecticut 8,350,899 2,232,138 341,112 2,573,250 5,777,649
58 Burns Waterway Harbor Indiana 7,969,513 449,212 21,170 470,382 7,499,131
59 Presque Isle Michigan 7,833,659 2,076,024 2,076,024 5,757,635
60 Providence Rhode Island 7,749,519 4,236,172 681,179 4,917,351 2,832,168
61 St. Clair Michigan 7,221,316 7,221,316
62 Port of Miami Florida 7,125,341 3,624,913 3,365,470 6,990,383 134,958
63 New Castle Delaware 6,918,896 1,435,452 476,292 1,911,744 5,007,152
64 Wilmington North Carolina 6,146,097 4,109,342 1,827,360 5,936,702 841,781
65 Port Fourchon Louisiana 6,626,240 1,600 1,600 6,624,640
66 Louisville Kentucky 6,402,755 6,402,755
67 Stoneport Michigan 6,315,862 27,464 836,579 864,043 5,451,819
68 Port of Wilmington Delaware 6,146,097 3,434,502 1,118,879 4,553,381 1,592,716
69 Mount Vernon Indiana 6,140,964 6,140,964
70 Port of Calcite Michigan 5,867,959 20,658 220,339 240,997 5,626,962
71 Camden-Gloucester City New Jersey 5,536,807 2,503,858 509,120 3,012,978 2,523,829
72 Port of Brownsville Texas 5,533,332 2,075,436 340,303 2,415,739 3,117,593
73 Port of Victoria Texas 5,519,511 5,519,511
74 Port of Vancouver USA Washington 5,363,607 621,054 4,227,716 4,848,770 514,837
75 Kaskaskia Illinois 5,208,066 5,208,066
76 Silver Bay Minnesota 5,163,975 925,757 925,757 4,238,218
77 Ashtabula Ohio 4,954,419 443,130 1,199,930 1,643,060 3,311,359
78 Conneaut Ohio 4,771,754 143,081 69,392 212,473 4,559,281
79 Saint Paul Minnesota 4,625,377 4,625,377
80 Nikiski Alaska 4,484,225 45,390 287,856 333,246 4,150,979
81 Port Inland Michigan 4,022,918 401,254 401,254 3,621,664
82 Escanaba, Michigan Michigan 3,756,984 195,149 195,149 3,561,835
83 Kahului Hawaii 3,668,583 11,778 11,539 23,317 3,645,266
84 Marblehead Ohio 3,579,746 72,294 1,287,318 1,359,612 2,220,134
85 Greenville Mississippi 3,474,197 3,474,197
86 Port of Stockton California 3,452,033 1,836,709 1,534,501 3,371,210 80,823
87 Morehead City North Carolina 3,425,659 690,717 1,051,004 1,741,721 1,683,938
88 Port of Terrebonne Louisiana 3,425,604 3,425,604
89 Port Canaveral Florida 3,337,439 2,671,156 143,944 2,815,100 522,339
90 Brunswick Georgia 3,227,650 1,158,954 1,969,693 3,128,647 99,003
91 Port of Milwaukee Wisconsin 3,129,354 1,572,159 1,572,159 1,557,195
92 Port Dolomite Michigan 3,087,556 464,368 464,368 2,623,188
93 Sandusky Ohio 2,987,807 100,804 1,978,338 2,079,142 908,665
94 Port of Anchorage Alaska 2,949,456 354,142 150,474 504,616 2,444,840
95 Port Manatee Florida 2,735,813 1,430,285 1,282,837 2,713,122 22,691
96 Tulsa Port of Catoosa Oklahoma 2,679,152 2,679,152
97 Portsmouth New Hampshire 2,679,152 2,003,852 157,827 2,161,679 2,094,956 517,473
98 Nashville Tennessee 2,632,700 2,632,700
99 Caruthersville Missouri 2,599,496 2,599,496
100 Port of Tucson Arizona 10,856 10,856

Not ranked

Non-continental islands

Map all coordinates using: OpenStreetMap · Google Maps
Download coordinates as: KML · GPX
Ports of non-continental islands
Port
Country,
Province
or State
GNIS
Feature
ID #
and
Reference
Link
Coordinates
Elevation
External
Link
San Juan PR 18°40′0.01″N 66°10′0.01″W / 18.6666694°N 66.1666694°W / 18.6666694; -66.1666694 (San Juan (Puerto Rico))
Marina Puerto Chico, Fajardo PR 1613388 18°20′54″N 65°38′6″W / 18.34833°N 65.63500°W / 18.34833; -65.63500 (Fajardo (Puerto Rico)) 20 feet (6.1 m)
Port of Ponce PR 18°0′4.54″N 66°43′0.01″W / 18.0012611°N 66.7166694°W / 18.0012611; -66.7166694 (Port of Ponce (Puerto Rico))
Christiansted, St Croix, Virgin Islands Port Authority VI 17°45′9.76″N 64°43′56.71″W / 17.7527111°N 64.7324194°W / 17.7527111; -64.7324194 (Christiansted, St. Croix (Virgin Islands))) [1]
Hilo HI 19°43′43″N 155°4′32.88″W / 19.72861°N 155.0758000°W / 19.72861; -155.0758000 (Hilo (Hawaii)) [2]
Kawaihae Harbor HI 20°2′16.01″N 155°49′59.88″W / 20.0377806°N 155.8333000°W / 20.0377806; -155.8333000 (Kawaihae Harbor (Hawaii)) [3]
Kahului HI 20°53′55″N 156°28′22.08″W / 20.89861°N 156.4728000°W / 20.89861; -156.4728000 (Kahului (Hawaii)) [4]
Port of Honolulu HI 21°18′40″N 157°52′18.12″W / 21.31111°N 157.8717000°W / 21.31111; -157.8717000 (Port of Honolulu (Hawaii)) [5]
Kalaeloa HI 21°17′50.03″N 158°6′32.04″W / 21.2972306°N 158.1089000°W / 21.2972306; -158.1089000 (Kalaeloa (Hawaii)) [6]
Nawiliwili HI 21°57′40″N 159°21′11.16″W / 21.96111°N 159.3531000°W / 21.96111; -159.3531000 (Nawiliwili (Hawaii))) [7]
Middle Ground harbor, Port of Guam GU 1389888 13°27′17″N 144°38′20″E / 13.45472°N 144.63889°E / 13.45472; 144.63889 (Middle Ground harbor, Port of Guam (Guam)) 0 feet (0 m) [8]
Agat harbor, Port of Guam GU 1934126 13°22′0″N 144°38′53″E / 13.36667°N 144.64806°E / 13.36667; 144.64806 (Agat Harbor, Port of Guam (Guam)) 0 feet (0 m) [9]
Ports of Saipan-Commonwealth Ports Authority of CNMI MP 15°11′N 145°45′E / 15.183°N 145.750°E / 15.183; 145.750 (Port of Saipan (MP)) [10]

See also

References

General References

This page was last edited on 13 February 2018, at 19:44.
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