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List of people pardoned by Bill Clinton

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The following is a partial list of people pardoned by Bill Clinton.[1] As President, Bill Clinton used his power under the U.S. Constitution to grant pardons and clemency to 456 people, thus commuting the sentences of those already convicted of a crime, and obviating a trial for those not yet convicted. On January 20, 2001, he pardoned 140 people in the final hours of his presidency.[2]

This list is a subset of the List of people pardoned or granted clemency by the President of the United States.

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  • ✪ Impeachment 101: Why, When, and How the President Can Be Removed from Office
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Transcription

Impeachment it turns out was a very central part of the Constitution of the United States meaning it’s obscure, people don’t know about it, but it probably was necessary for the Constitution actually to be ratified by the American people. You can see the impeachment clause, and I’m going to explain its content in a moment, but you can see it as part of the American Revolution itself in the sense that the revolt against a king who was a leader who had authority over 'We the People' was incomplete if we didn’t have a mechanism by which we could get rid of our leaders, including the president, which was a way of ensuring we didn’t have anything like a monarchy. Now the way impeachment worked is that in the early American colonies before America was America we started impeaching people who were following orders from the king. And what that meant was that an abusive authority would be called out by some legislative assembly and in the initial phase what would happen would be there would just be a vote that the person had abused authority and then if the thing fell to completion, and this goes back to England, there would be a trial. And in the trial the person would be convicted of the offense for which impeachment was had and if convicted the person would be removed from office. So to bring this back to the American structure as it developed after the Revolution and after the Constitution came into place, and this was thought through with such care in Philadelphia when the Constitution was debated, the idea was that if there is a high crime and misdemeanor, and we can talk a bit about what that means, or if there’s treason or bribery then the House of Representatives by majority vote can impeach the President, the Vice President, Supreme Court justices, members of the cabinet. And what that means is there’s a kind of official judgment that the person has done something very, very bad and after that the proceeding moves to the Senate, which is acting like a court and which decides whether to convict, which means to remove the person from office. The House makes the impeachment vote by a majority vote. That doesn’t mean anyone has to leave office. It then goes to the Senate, which if it votes by a 2/3 majority to convict on the ground on which the let’s say President was impeached then the person is, as they say about baseballs that are hit very hard... the President is gone. Yes. Because the word 'high crimes and misdemeanors' seems to mean kind of felonies, high crimes and misdemeanors, the normal current reader would think oh is there a crime? If you go back to the 18th century it’s actually a lot more inspiring than that and kind of fitting with a system that’s committed to self-government. So if there’s a crime, let’s call it jaywalking or shoplifting or not paying your income taxes, that’s not a high crime or misdemeanor in the constitutional sense. What is meant by high crime and misdemeanor is an abuse of official authority and shoplifting or income tax evasion that’s a crime, it’s not an abuse of official authority. If the President of the United States, let's suppose, decides I'm going to pardon every police officer who shot an African-American, that's not itself likely to be a crime. The President has the pardon power, but that is definitely an impeachable offense. In fact James Madison spoke of abuse of the pardon power as an impeachable offense. If the President of the United States decides I’m going to go on vacation in Paris for the next six months because it’s really beautiful, that’s certainly not a crime, but it’s an impeachable offense that’s an egregious neglect of the authority of the office. So abuse of the authority of the office if it’s egregious, pardon power for example would be one, if the president starts invading civil liberties in a terrible way by locking people up for insufficient reason, by going crazy in terms of security measures at airports and borders — and by going crazy I’m using that as kind of a legal term of art — really exceeding the bounds of the reasonable, that is not a crime but that is an abuse of authority and there we’re right back in the impeachment clause, which is I think first and foremost a way of preserving our rights and liberties and a way of calling out an authority who has invaded them. Think now about what the American Revolution was fought for. I’ve spent a lot of last months in the 18th century and the people back then were on the impeachment issues and presidential authority issues they were off the charts good. In the debate in Virginia on whether we should ratify the Constitution, one really learned person said, “We cannot ratify this Constitution. And the reason is the pardon power.” And it was urged by the skeptic, the President could participate in something really sinister with one of his advisers, then his advisor is in legal trouble and then the President can pardon the person for engaging in illegal or corrupt activity that the President initiated. How can we allow a constitution that has that in it? That’s a fair question and it was stated with great precision as an objection to the Constitution as I recall by someone who had actually signed the Declaration of Independence and I know that person was at the Constitutional Convention and refused to embrace it. James Madison very quietly responded, and he said, “I think the gentleman has overlooked something,” isn’t that a sweet way of responding to someone when the stakes are super high whether we’re going to have a Constitution. “The gentleman has overlook something,” and then Madison explained, “If the President uses the pardon power to shelter someone who’s done something terrible there’s something available in the Constitution, impeachment.” And Madison actually did his interlocutor one better, the interlocutor was saying, “If the President advises something terrible and participates in it and then pardons the person, isn’t that awful?” Madison said, “Yes that’s awful and that’s impeachable,” but Madison’s words seemed to go beyond that to say if you pardon someone who’s done something terrible, one of your own people, that’s itself a legitimate grounds for impeachment, which suggested that abuse of the pardon power, in the words of James Madison, “That’s an impeachable offense.” And with respect to the meaning of the Constitution, it is hazardous to argue with James Madison. The beauty of the impeachment mechanism is its connection with the principle that we have a republic and not a monarchy, which means it puts 'We the People' in charge. That means that in vocation of the impeachment mechanism, whether it’s a Democratic President or a Republican President, really depends on 'We the People'. So if you think of examples there was some interest under President Bush and President Obama some interest in impeaching them. But I think thank goodness we the people, even if we didn’t like either of those presidents, didn’t think there was an impeachable offense. Under President Nixon, by contrast, and I believe very unfortunately under President Clinton because he didn’t commit an impeachable offense, but under both of them there was a public demand for getting rid of them on the ground that President Nixon had abused his presidential authority to cover up crimes and also had himself use presidential authority to invade civil rights and civil liberties. That got people, whatever their political affiliation, sufficiently charged up that they either were willing to go along with those members of the House of Representatives who wanted to impeach Nixon, or they fueled that. In the Clinton case there was a thought, and again perjury and obstruction of justice, which were the charges against President Clinton, there’s nothing good about them they’re very bad, but they weren’t in his case impeachable offenses under the Constitution. Nonetheless people were charged up. A lot of people were charged up. So whether the President is a Democrat or a Republican, whether it's President Trump or in the future some left-of-center President, if people think that there's something that really is beyond the pale and that's not the Constitutional test but it's a kind of colloquial way of getting at the Constitutional test, beyond the pail of legitimate uses of authority then we the people we’re the boss. So the question who’s the boss? The first three words of the Constitution say it, we the people and the impeachment clause kind of makes that real.

Commutations

  1. James Barker (Flonzy)
  2. Ronald Henderson Blackley
  3. Bert Wayne Bolan
  4. Boss Gregory Duanne
  5. Jon Michael Burton – charged with heavy drug trafficking
  6. Gloria Libia Camargo
  7. Charles F. Campbell
  8. David Ronald Chandler – federal death row inmate[3]
  9. Lau Ching Chin
  10. Donald R. Clark
  11. Loreta De-Ann Coffman
  12. Derrick Curry
  13. Velinda Desalus
  14. Jacob Elbaum
  15. Linda Sue Evans
  16. Loretta sharon Fish
  17. Antoinette M. Frink
  18. David Goldstein
  19. Gerard A. Greenfield
  20. Bob F. Griffin – former Speaker of the Missouri House of Representatives, who was serving two years on bribery charges[4]
  21. Jodie E. Israel
  22. Kimberly Johnson
  23. Billy Thornton Langston Jr.
  24. Vicki Lopez Lukis – former Lee County, FL Commissioner who was serving a 27-month sentence for honest services mail fraud; her conviction was vacated on February 14, 2011
  25. Belinda Lynn Lumpkin
  26. Peter MacDonaldNavajo Chairman, serving a 14-year sentence for fraud and racketeering convictions
  27. Kellie Ann Mann
  28. Peter Ninemire
  29. Hugh Ricardo Padmore
  30. Amy Ralston Pofahl - released on July 7, 2000 due to "disparity of sentence" because her husband, the ringleader, received 3 years probation and she was held accountable for all the drugs he manufactured even though her role was limited.
  31. Arnold Paul Prosperi – Florida attorney, tax fraud, managed Clinton's 1967 campaign for student-council president[5]
  32. Melvin J. Reynolds – Democratic Congressman from Illinois – bank fraud and obstruction of justice
  33. Pedro Miguel Riveiro
  34. Dorothy Rivers – lead official in Jesse Jackson's Rainbow/PUSH Coalition, plead guilty to theft of $1.2 million in federal grant money
  35. Susan Rosenberg
  36. Kalmen Stern
  37. Cory Stringfellow
  38. Carlos Anibal Vignaliconvicted of cocaine trafficking
  39. Thomas Wilson Waddell III
  40. Harvey Weining
  41. Kim Allen Willis
  42. Kemba Smith

Pardons

  1. Verla Jean Allen (1990 false statements to an agency of the United States)[6]
  2. Nicholas M. Altiere (1983 importation of cocaine)
  3. Bernice Ruth Altschul (1992 money laundering conspiracy)
  4. Joe Anderson Jr. (1988 income tax evasion)
  5. William Sterling Anderson (1987 defraudment of a financial institution, false statements to a financial institution, wire fraud)
  6. Mansour Azizkhani (1984 false statements in bank loan applications)
  7. Cleveland Victor Babin Jr. (1987 using the U.S. mail service to defraud)
  8. Chris Harmon Bagley (1989 conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute cocaine)
  9. Scott Lynn Bane (unlawful distribution of marijuana)
  10. Thomas Cleveland Barber (issuing worthless checks)
  11. Peggy Ann Bargon (violation of the Lacey Act, violation of the Bald Eagle Protection Act)
  12. David Roscoe Blampied (possess with intent to distribute cocaine)
  13. William Arthur Borders Jr. (conspiracy to corruptly solicit and accept money in return for influencing the official acts of a federal district court judge (Alcee L. Hastings), and to defraud the United States in connection with the performance of lawful government functions, corruptly influencing, obstructing, impeding and endeavoring to influence, obstruct and impede the due administration of justice, and aiding and abetting therein, and traveling interstate with intent to commit bribery)
  14. Arthur David Borel (odometer rollback)[7]
  15. Douglas Charles Borel (odometer rollback)[7]
  16. George Thomas Brabham (making a false statement or report to a federally insured bank)
  17. Almon Glenn Braswell (1983 mail fraud and perjury)
  18. Leonard Browder (illegal dispensing of controlled substance and Medicaid fraud)
  19. David Steven Brown (securities fraud and mail fraud)
  20. Delores Caroylene Burleson, aka Delores Cox Burleson (possession of marijuana)
  21. John H. Bustamante (wire fraud)
  22. Mary Louise Campbell (unauthorized use and transfer of food stamps)
  23. Eloida Candelaria (false information in registering to vote)
  24. Dennis Sobrevinas Capili (filing false statements in alien registration)
  25. Donna Denise Chambers (intent to distribute cocaine)
  26. Douglas Eugene Chapman (bank fraud)
  27. Ronald Keith Chapman (bank fraud)
  28. Francisco Larois Chavez (aiding and abetting illegal entry of aliens)[7]
  29. Henry Cisneros (former HUD Secretary)
  30. Roger Clinton, Jr. (cocaine charges, half-brother of President Bill Clinton)[5]
  31. Stuart Harris Cohn (illegal sale of commodity options)
  32. David Marc Cooper (conspiracy to defraud the government)
  33. Ernest Harley Cox Jr. (defraud of federally insured savings and loan)
  34. John F. Cross Jr. (embezzlement)
  35. Rickey Lee Cunningham (intent to distribute marijuana)
  36. Richard Anthony De Labio (mail fraud)
  37. John Deutch (former Director of Central Intelligence Agency)
  38. Richard Douglas (false statements to a government agent)
  39. Edward Downe, Jr. (wire fraud, false income tax returns and securities fraud)
  40. Marvin Dean Dudley (false statements)
  41. Larry Lee Duncan
  42. Galen R. Elmore (convicted of cattle theft)
  43. Robert Clinton Fain
  44. Marcos Arcenio Fernandez
  45. Alvarez Ferrouillet
  46. Henry O. Flipper – guilty of "conduct unbecoming an officer" (1882)
  47. William Dennis Fugazy
  48. Lloyd Reid George
  49. Louis Goldstein
  50. Rubye Lee Gordon
  51. Pincus Green
  52. Robert Ivey Hamner
  53. Samuel Price Handley
  54. Woodie Randolph Handley
  55. Jay Houston Harmon
  56. Rick Hendrick
  57. John Hemmingson
  58. David S. Herdlinger
  59. Debi Rae Huckleberry
  60. Warren C. Hultgren Jr.
  61. Donald Ray James
  62. Stanley Pruet Jobe
  63. Ruben H. Johnson
  64. Linda Jones
  65. Preston King (Civil rights activism)[8]
  66. James Howard Lake
  67. June Louise Lewis
  68. Salim Bonnor Lewis
  69. John Leighton Lodwick
  70. Hildebrando Lopez
  71. Jose Julio Luaces
  72. James Timothy Maness
  73. James Lowell Manning, (1982, aiding and assisting in the preparation of a false corporate income tax return)
  74. John Robert Martin
  75. Frank Ayala Martinez
  76. Silvia Leticia Beltran Martinez
  77. John Francis McCormick
  78. Susan H. McDougal (Whitewater controversy)
  79. Howard Mechanic
  80. Brook K. Mitchell Sr.
  81. Samuel Loring Morison
  82. Charles Wilfred Morgan III
  83. Richard Anthony Nazzaro
  84. Charlene Ann Nosenko
  85. Vernon Raymond Obermeier
  86. Miguelina Ogalde
  87. David C. Owen
  88. Robert W. Palmer
  89. Kelli Anne Perhosky
  90. Richard H. Pezzopane
  91. Orville Rex Phillips
  92. Vinson Stewart Poling Jr.
  93. James G. Powell
  94. Norman Lyle Prouse – former Captain for Northwest Airlines, imprisoned for flying while intoxicated[7]
  95. Willie H. H. Pruitt Jr.[9]
  96. Danny Martin Pursley Sr.
  97. Charles D. Ravenel
  98. William Clyde Ray
  99. Alfredo Luna Regalado
  100. Ildefonso Reynes Ricafort
  101. Marc Rich
  102. Howard Winfield Riddle
  103. Richard Wilson Riley Jr. (cocaine and marijuana charges, father was Clinton's Education Secretary)[5]
  104. Samuel Lee Robbins
  105. Joel Gonzales Rodriguez
  106. Michael James Rogers
  107. Anna Louise Ross
  108. Dan Rostenkowski – former Democratic Congressman convicted in the Congressional Post Office scandal
  109. Gerald Glen Rust
  110. Jerri Ann Rust
  111. Bettye June Rutherford
  112. Gregory Lee Sands
  113. Al Schwimmer
  114. Albert A. Seretti Jr.
  115. Patricia Campbell Hearst Shaw
  116. Dennis Joseph Smith
  117. Gerald Owen Smith
  118. Stephen A. Smith
  119. Jimmie Lee Speake
  120. Charles Bernard Stewart
  121. Marlena Francisca Stewart-Rollins
  122. Fife Symington III – former Republican Arizona governor
  123. Richard Lee Tannehill
  124. Nicholas C. Tenaglia
  125. Gary Allen Thomas
  126. Larry Weldon Todd
  127. Olga C. Trevino
  128. Ignatious Vamvouklis
  129. Patricia A. Van De Weerd
  130. Christopher V. Wade
  131. Bill Wayne Warmath
  132. Jack Kenneth Watson
  133. Donna Lynn Webb
  134. Donald William Wells
  135. Robert H. Wendt
  136. Jack L. Williams
  137. Kavin Arthur Williams
  138. Robert Michael Williams
  139. Jimmie Lee Wilson
  140. Thelma Louise Wingate
  141. Mitchell Couey Wood
  142. Warren Stannard Wood
  143. Dewey Worthey
  144. Rick Allen Yale
  145. Joseph A. Yasak
  146. William Stanley Yingling
  147. Phillip David Young
  148. Keith Sanders
  149. Darren Muci
  150. John Scott (not a full pardon)
  151. Amy Ralston Pofahl (drug money laundering, distribution and manufacturing Ecstasy)

References

  1. ^ Clinton's pardons and commutations, U.S. Department of Justice
  2. ^ Healy, Patrick, "Bill Clinton Criticizes Bush on Libby Move", The New York Times, 2007-06-04
  3. ^ http://www.deathpenaltyinfo.org/article.php?did=126&scid=13
  4. ^ http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1355/is_/ai_69475108[permanent dead link]
  5. ^ a b c http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,99871-2,00.html
  6. ^ U.S. Department of Justice, Pardon Grants January 2001
  7. ^ a b c d Montero, Douglas (January 28, 2001). "They paid their dues for pardons". New York Post.
  8. ^ https://books.google.com/books?id=gMMDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA38&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q&f=false
  9. ^ "Clinton pardon arrives for AWOL", St Petersburg Times, 2001-02-11
This page was last edited on 21 February 2019, at 15:44
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