To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
Languages
Recent
Show all languages
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

List of non-extant papal tombs

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Despite his being regarded as martyred into the Black Sea, multiple churches have laid claims to the translated relics of Pope Clement I.
Despite his being regarded as martyred into the Black Sea, multiple churches have laid claims to the translated relics of Pope Clement I.

This is a list of non-extant papal tombs, which includes tombs not included on the list of extant papal tombs. Information about these tombs is generally incomplete and uncertain.

Chronologically, the main locations of destroyed or unknown papal tombs have been: the obscure tombs of the first two centuries of popes near Saint Peter, the repeated waves of translations from the Catacombs of Rome, the demolition of the papal tombs in Old St. Peter's Basilica, and the 1306 and 1361 fires in the Archbasilica of Saint John Lateran.

Papal tombs have also been destroyed by other instances of fire, remodeling, and war (most recently, World War II). Others are unknown due to creative or geographically remote methods of martyrdom, or—in the case of Pope Clement I—both. Burial in churches outside the Aurelian Walls of Rome (Italian: fuori le Mura)—in the basilicas of Paul or Lorenzo—have not generally survived.

Main locations

The main locations of destroyed or lost papal tombs include:

Other destroyed or unknown tombs

1st century

Pontificate Portrait Common English name Tomb Sculptor Location Notes
88/92–97/101
StClement1.jpg
Clement I
Saint Clement
Desjatynna westerfeld.jpg
According to doctrine, translated to the Church of the Tithes (Kiev)[6] According to doctrine thrown into the Black Sea near Crimea, translated to the Church of the Holy Apostles, then Basilica di San Clemente, then the Church of the Tithes.[6]

2nd century

Pontificate Portrait Common English name Tomb Sculptor Location Notes
105/107–115/116
Pope Alexander I.jpg
Alexander I
Saint Alexander
Competing claims (involving translation):[7]
115/116–125
SixtusI.jpg
Sixtus I
Saint Sixtus
Competing claims (involving translation and a finger):[8]
174/175–189
Eleutherius.jpg
Eleuterus
Saint Eleutherus
Competing claims:[9]

5th century

Pontificate Portrait Common English name Tomb Sculptor Location Notes
31 July 432–March/August 440 Sixtus III
Saint Sixtus
Basilica of Saint Lawrence outside the Walls.jpg
San Lorenzo fuori le Mura[10] Then called San Lorenzo al Verano; sarcophagus destroyed, possibly in 1943[10]
19 November 461 – 29 February 468
Nuremberg chronicles - Hilarius, Pope (CXXXVIv).jpg
Hilarius
Saint Hilarius
Basilica of Saint Lawrence outside the Walls.jpg
San Lorenzo fuori le Mura, crypt[11] Then called San Lorenzo al Verano
13 March 483 – 1 March 492
Felix3.jpg
Felix III (Felix II)
Saint Felix
Either San Paolo fuori le Mura or the crypt of Santissima Concenzione near Piazza Barberini[12]

6th century

Pontificate Portrait Common English name Tomb Sculptor Location Notes
1 June 536 – 11 November 537
Silverius.jpg
Silverius
Saint Silverius
Isola Palmaria.jpg
Palmaria[13] Non-contemporary shrine extant on Ponza Island[14]
29 March 537 – 7 June 555
Vigilius.jpg
Vigilius Either San Marcello on the Via Salaria (Oxford Dictionary of Popes) or San Silvestre over the Catacomb of Priscilla on the Via Salaria (Catholic Encyclopedia)[15]

7th century

Pontificate Portrait Common English name Tomb Sculptor Location Notes
July 649 – 16 September 655
Pope Martin I.jpg
Martin I
Saint Martin
Chersonesos columns.jpg
Church of our Lady (Blachdernæ), near Chersonesus Possibly buried in Archbasilica of St. John Lateran

9th century

Pontificate Portrait Common English name Tomb Sculptor Location Notes
25 January 817 – 11 February 824
Pope Paschalis I. in apsis mosaic of Santa Prassede in Rome.gif
Paschal I
Saint Paschal
Unknown, but likely destroyed Alleged to have been buried in the chapel of St. Zeno of Santa Prassade (disproved by modern research); possibly buried under the altar of the oratory of Saints Processus and Martiniano and lost when the oratory was moved in 1548 or 1605.[16]

10th century

Pontificate Portrait Common English name Tomb Sculptor Location Notes
July 903 – September 903
Pope Leo V.jpg
Leo V Unknown but destroyed Either cremated and thrown in the Tiber, buried (and thus destroyed) in Old Saint Peter's, or buried whole in Archbasilica of Saint John Lateran[17]
1 October 965 – 6 September 972 John XIII
Roma San Paolo fuori le mura BW 1.JPG
Basilica of Saint Paul Outside the Walls Destroyed[18]

11th century

Pontificate Portrait Common English name Tomb Sculptor Location Notes
June 1003 – December 1003
Papa Joao XVII.jpg
John XVII Unknown but destroyed Either San Paolo fuori le Mura, Archbasilica of Saint John Lateran or Santa Sabina[19]
25 December 1003 – July 1009
Ioannes XVIII.jpg
John XVIII Unknown but destroyed Either San Paolo fuori le Mura or Archbasilica of Saint John Lateran[20]
1032–1044
Pope Benedict IX Illustration.jpg
Benedict IX
Grottaferrata-abbazia01.jpg
Abbey of Grottaferrata Discovered on March 4, 1739; destroyed during World War II[21]
1045
Silvestro3.jpg
Sylvester III Unknown[22]
13 April 1055 – 28 July 1057
Vicii bild.jpg
Victor II Santa Maria Rotunda (Ravenna) Destroyed; claimed reburied in San Reparata (Florence) unsupported by evidence[23]
2 August 1057 – 29 March 1058
B Stephan IX.jpg
Stephen IX, O.S.B.
Duomo Firenze Apr 2008 (12).JPG
Santa Reparata (Florence) Tomb discovered in 1357 during the laying of the foundation for the new Duomo[23]
6 December 1058 – 27 July 1061
Papa Nicolau II.jpg
Nicholas II
Duomo Firenze Apr 2008 (12).JPG
Santa Reparata (Florence) Possibly reburied in the outer left aisle of St. Peter's; no remains of tomb in either today[23]
30 September 1061 – 21 April 1073
Papa alessandro II.jpg
Alexander II Unknown but lost Either Archbasilica of Saint John Lateran or St. Peter's[23]

12th century

Pontificate Portrait Common English name Tomb Sculptor Location Notes
21 October 1187 – 17 December 1187
B Gregor VIII.jpg
Gregory VIII, Can. Reg.
PisaDuomoSunset20020322.JPG
Pisa Cathedral, Chapel of Our Lady Destroyed in the fire of 1600;[24] ordered the desecration of the tomb of Antipope Victor IV in Lucca on his way to Pisa, where he died

13th century

Pontificate Portrait Common English name Tomb Sculptor Location Notes
18 July 1216 – 18 March 1227
Interior of Santi Giovanni e Paolo (Venice) - Honorius III by Leandro Bassano.jpg
Honorius III
SantaMariaMaggiore front.jpg
Basilica di Santa Maria Maggiore No longer extant[25]
12 December 1254 – 25 May 1261
B Alexander IV.jpg
Alexander IV
Duomo di viterbo, esterno 01.jpg
Viterbo Cathedral Destroyed in 1490;[26] no longer extant[27]

Notes

  1. ^ Reardon, 2004, pp. 23–26.
  2. ^ Reardon, 2004, p. 23.
  3. ^ Reardon, 2004, pp. 10–11.
  4. ^ Reardon, 2004, pp. 272–277.
  5. ^ Reardon, 2004, pp. 70–109.
  6. ^ a b Reardon, 2004, pp. 23–24.
  7. ^ Reardon, 2004, p. 24.
  8. ^ Reardon, 2004, pp. 24–25.
  9. ^ Reardon, 2005, p. 26.
  10. ^ a b Reardon, 2004, p. 40.
  11. ^ Reardon, 2004, p. 41.
  12. ^ Reardon, 2004, 41–42.
  13. ^ Reardon, 2004, p. 44.
  14. ^ Reardon, 2004, p. 270.
  15. ^ Reardon, 2004, p. 45.
  16. ^ Reardon, 2004, p. 61.
  17. ^ Reardon, 2004, p. 69.
  18. ^ Reardon, 2004, p. 73.
  19. ^ Reardon, 2004, p. 79.
  20. ^ Reardon, 2004, p. 80.
  21. ^ Reardon, 2004, p. 81.
  22. ^ Reardon, 2004, p. 82.
  23. ^ a b c d Reardon, 2004, p. 85.
  24. ^ Reardon, 2004, p. 98.
  25. ^ Reardon, 2004, p. 100.
  26. ^ Reardon, 2004, p. 103.
  27. ^ Frothingham, A. L., Jr. (1891). "Notes on Roman Artists of the Middle Ages. III. Two Tombs of the Popes at Viterbo by Vassallectus and Petrus Oderisi". The American Journal of Archaeology and of the History of the Fine Arts, 7(1/2): 38.

References

  • Reardon, Wendy J. 2004. The Deaths of the Popes. Macfarland & Company, Inc. ISBN 0-7864-1527-4
This page was last edited on 18 January 2021, at 18:08
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.