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List of motorcycles by type of engine

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

List of motorcycles by type of engine is a list of motorcycles by the type of motorcycle engine used by the vehicle, such as by the number of cylinders or configuration.

A transverse engine is an engine mounted in a vehicle so that the engine's crankshaft axis is perpendicular to the direction of travel. In a longitudinal engine configuration, the engine's crankshaft axis is parallel with the direction of travel. However, the description of the orientation of "V" and "flat" motorcycle engines differs from this convention. Motorcycles with a V-twin engine mounted with its crankshaft mounted in line with the frame, e.g. the Honda CX series, are said to have "transverse" engines,[1][2] while motorcycles with a V-twin mounted with its crankshaft mounted perpendicular to the frame, e.g. most Harley-Davidsons, are said to have "longitudinal" engines.[1][2] This convention uses the longest horizontal dimension (length or width) of the engine as its axis instead of the line of the crankshaft.

There are many different models of motorcycles that have been produced, and as such, this list is not exhaustive and contains only more notable examples.

Single cylinder

Split-single

The split-single (Doppelkolbenmotor to its German and Austrian manufacturers), is a variant on the two-stroke engine with two cylinders sharing a single combustion chamber. It is also known as a twingle, U-cylinder, or doppelkolben[4]

Two cylinder

V-twin

Longitudinal

Transverse

Flat-twin

Longitudinal

Transverse

Douglas

Straight twin

a.k.a. parallel-twin, inline-twin, vertical-twin, straight-two, or inline-two

Transverse

Longitudinal

Tandem twin

The Tandem Twin is where the cylinders are longitudinal, and have two cranks geared together. A tandem twin is effectively a pair of geared singles, and is to be distinguished from an inline twin. Tandem twins are suitable primarily for two-stroke racers.

Longitudinal

Three cylinder

Straight three

Transverse

Longitudinal

V-three

Transverse

Four cylinder

This is a partial list of some of the many four-cylinder motorcycle designs.

Straight four

Transverse

Longitudinal

V-four

Transverse

Longitudinal

Flat four

Longitudinal

Square four

H four

Transverse

Five cylinder

Straight five

Transverse

V-five

Transverse

Six cylinder

Straight six

Transverse

Flat six

Longitudinal

8 cylinder

V-8

Longitudinal

Transverse

10 cylinder

V-10

Longitudinal

12 cylinder

V-12

Transverse

48 cylinder

Transverse

  • Simon Whitlock's 48-cylinder motorcycle[32]

Turbocharged and supercharged

Wankel

The Wankel engine is a type of internal combustion engine using an eccentric rotary design to convert pressure into rotating motion. All parts rotate consistently in one direction, as opposed to the common reciprocating piston engine, which has pistons violently changing direction. It is also known as a rotary engine.

Radial

The radial engine is a reciprocating type internal combustion engine configuration in which the cylinders "radiate" outward from a central crankcase like the spokes of a wheel.

Rotary radial

The rotary engine was an early type of internal combustion engine, usually designed with an odd number of cylinders per row in a radial configuration, in which the crankshaft remained stationary in operation, with the entire crankcase and its attached cylinders rotating around it as a unit.

Turbine

Steam

Electric

Electric scooters in Vietnam
Electric scooters in Vietnam

Electric motorcycles and scooters are plug-in electric vehicles with two or three wheels powered by electricity. The electricity is stored on board in a rechargeable battery, which drives one or more electric motors.

Diesel

Only very small numbers of diesel engined motorcycles have ever been built. The improved fuel efficiency is offset by the increased weight, reduced acceleration and potential difficulty of starting, at least in colder climates.

  • Sommer Diesel 462[46]
  • Track T-800CDI[46]
  • Neander Turbo Diesel[46]
  • Star Twin Thunder Star 1200 TDI[46]
  • Hero MotoCorp RNT[46]
  • Royal Enfield Taurus

Multi-engine

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Clarke, Massimo (2010). Modern Motorcycle Technology: How Every Part of Your Motorcycle Works. Minneapolis, MN USA: MotorBooks International. p. 44. ISBN 978-0-7603-3819-3. Retrieved 2013-05-31. Moto Guzzi's transverse V-twins are unique among motorcycles, while Ducati, in keeping with the classical school, uses a longitudinal V, meaning the axis of rotation of the crankshaft is transverse to the frame.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link)
  2. ^ a b Grubb, Jake (March 1975). Linkletter, John A. (ed.). "Easy riders—the grand touring motorcycles for '75". Popular Mechanics. 143 (3): 82–85, 126–127. ISSN 0032-4558. Retrieved 2013-05-31.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link)
  3. ^ a b "NSU 2000cc Single Cylinder Motorcycle". thekneeslider.com. 16 June 2008. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  4. ^ a b SPLIT/SINGLES and what they are!
  5. ^ "Production Racer – 1938 DKW SS 250". bike-urious.com. 7 April 2014. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  6. ^ "Old Bike Australasia: Splitting the single - EMC 350cc - Shannons Club". shannons.com.au. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  7. ^ "The Other Triumph – 1953 Triumph TWN Cornet". bike-urious.com. 4 November 2014. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  8. ^ "Leonhardt Gunbus 410 named largest street legal motorbike in the world". motorbiketimes.com. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  9. ^ "Honda NT650".
  10. ^ "Honda NT650".
  11. ^ "Honda Deauville".
  12. ^ Motor Cycling, November 12th, 1902
  13. ^ "The Evolution of the Motor Cycle", Motor Cycle magazine, June 1st, 1922, pp700-706
  14. ^ a b "2014 Triple-Cylinder Street Bike Shootout - Motorcycle USA". motorcycle-usa.com. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  15. ^ a b c d e "Top 10 car-engined bikes". visordown.com. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  16. ^ a b "Section 6 - Beginner's Guide to Motorcycling". totalmotorcycle.com. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  17. ^ a b "The History Of Four-Cylinder Motorcycle Engines In America". motorcycle.com. 27 February 2015. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  18. ^ "Section 6 - Beginner's Guide to Motorcycling". totalmotorcycle.com. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  19. ^ "Suprine Exodus BMW Powered Recumbent Motorcycle". thekneeslider.com. 20 May 2013. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  20. ^ "Suzuki History - Suzuki racing models 1960—1967". www.suzukicycles.org. Retrieved 1 July 2018.
  21. ^ "Memorable Motorcycle: Honda RC148 - Motorcycle USA". motorcycle-usa.com. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  22. ^ "Honda Worldwide - Goodwood". honda.com. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  23. ^ "6-Cylinder Motorcycle Shootout - Classic Japanese Motorcycles - Motorcycle Classics". motorcycleclassics.com. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  24. ^ "Horex VR6 returns ahead of schedule - Motorbike Writer". motorbikewriter.com. 3 September 2015. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  25. ^ "Aurora Motorcycles V8 has more shove than an H2R". motorcyclenews.com. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  26. ^ "Sabertooth Motorcycles Unleashes a Twin Turbo Thrill Ride". motorcyclecruiser.com. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  27. ^ "Rapom V8: Road legal drag-machine equipped with a 1.200Hp 8.2 V8 Mopar engine". carscoops.com. 2007-01-23. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  28. ^ "The Aussie-built 2-liter, 334-horsepower PGM V8 motorcycle". gizmag.com. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  29. ^ "V10-engined Boss Hoss Cries For Millyard Viper V10's Notoriety". topspeed.com. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  30. ^ "Motorcycles with Car Engines - Good Spark Garage". goodsparkgarage.com. 15 May 2014. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  31. ^ "Honda CBX V12 by Andreas Georgeades". thekneeslider.com. 30 October 2009. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  32. ^ Wojdyla, Ben. "48-Cylinder Kawasaki Pushes Boundaries Of Sanity". jalopnik.com. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  33. ^ "Yamaha XJ650 Turbo". Motorcycle Specifications, reviews, road tests. Retrieved 1 July 2018.
  34. ^ a b c "Top 10 Wankel engined bikes". visordown.com. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  35. ^ "Customs JRL Cycles' Radial Chopper - Motorcycle USA". motorcycle-usa.com. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  36. ^ "Radial Engine Motorcycle by JRL Cycles". thekneeslider.com. 17 May 2006. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  37. ^ "Jesse James' seven-cylinder, 2800cc, Aero Bike!". fasterandfaster.net. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  38. ^ "Radial Hell - CW Exclusive Feature". cycleworld.com. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  39. ^ "Road legal turbine motorcycle breaks three world records". gizmag.com. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  40. ^ [1]
  41. ^ Daniel Strohl, "Records are meant to be broken: 80.4 MPH on a steam-powere | Hemmings Daily", October 17, 2014
  42. ^ "Steampunk Motorcycles". thekneeslider.com. 9 July 2007. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  43. ^ "AMA Motorcycle Museum Hall of Fame - Sylvester Roper". motorcyclemuseum.org. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  44. ^ "Roper Steam Powered Velocipede or Motocycle". stanleymotorcarriage.com. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  45. ^ "POLARIS ACQUIRES ELECTRIC MOTORCYCLE BUSINESS FROM BRAMMO - Polaris Industries". polaris.com. Archived from the original on 24 September 2015. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  46. ^ a b c d e "Smoke and Mirrors: 5 Best Diesel Motorcycles". gearpatrol.com. 4 August 2014. Retrieved 2 February 2017.
  47. ^ "Triumph's Bonneville Connection". Motorsports Network. Archived from the original on 2014-10-11. Retrieved 2014-10-07.
  48. ^ Yoav Gilad (September 15, 2014), "World's fastest motorcycle restored", Petrolicious, May Moon Media

External links

This page was last edited on 14 May 2020, at 21:24
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