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List of incidents of civil unrest in the United States

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Wikipedia has articles on most of the major episodes of civil unrest.[1]

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Transcription

Contents

18th century

19th century

1800–1849

1850–1859

1860–1869

1870–1879

The New York Orange Riot of 1871, between Irish Catholics and Irish Protestants.
The New York Orange Riot of 1871, between Irish Catholics and Irish Protestants.

1880–1889

1890–1899

20th century

1900–1909

1910–1919

1920–1929

1930–1939

1940–1949

1950–1959

1960–1969

1970–1979

1980–1989

1990–1999

21st century

2000–2009

2010–2018

  • 2010 – Springfest riot, April 10, 200 police disperse crowd of 8,000 using tear gas, pepper spray, rubber bullets, and bean bag rounds, near the campus of James Madison University; dozens injured. 30–35 arrested; Harrisonburg, Virginia
  • 2010 – Santa Cruz May Day riot, May 1, 250 rampage through downtown Santa Cruz attacking 18 businesses, causing an estimated $100,000 in damages. 1 arrested. Santa Cruz, California
  • 2010 – Oakland protest riot, Nov. 5, Police made more than 150 arrests as a crowd broke windows and knocked down fences, protesting sentence of former BART officer in shooting of Oscar Grant on New Years Day 2009; see BART Police shooting of Oscar Grant. Oakland, California
  • 2011 – Occupy Wall Street (Brooklyn Bridge protests). Demonstrators blocked the bridge and more than 700 people were arrested. New York, New York
  • 2011 – Occupy Wall Street Oakland protests riots. October. Protesters shattered windows, set fires, and plastered buildings with graffiti. Riot police fired heavy amounts of tear gas on the protesters.
  • 2012 – NATO 2012 Chicago Summit, May. Conflict between riot police and protesters. Dozens of demonstrators clubbed and arrested.
  • 2012 – Anaheim police shooting and protests, July 28. Violence erupted after multiple shootings in the neighborhood by police that included unarmed Manuel Diaz. 24 people were arrested
  • 2013 – Flatbush Riots, March 11, Riots in Brooklyn, New York after the death of Kimani Gray who was shot and killed by NYPD
  • 2014 – Ferguson unrest, Ferguson, Missouri, August 10. Following the shooting death of Michael Brown by a Ferguson police officer, protests erupt in the streets. Police respond with riot gear, tear gas and rubber bullets.
  • 2014 – New York, New York, and Berkeley, California – After prosecutors and a grand jury refused to indict a police officer in the death of Eric Garner, protests erupted in New York City and other cities.
  • 2014 Oakland riots, Nov. - Dec., A series of riots and civil disturbances that took place in Oakland and the surrounding area, in reaction to the events involving the Shooting of Michael Brown and later, the death of Eric Garner, Oakland, California
  • 2015 – 2015 Baltimore protests, April 25–28. Days of protests break out following the death of Freddie Gray while in police custody. 34 people are arrested and 15 Officers injured after rioting and looting break out. Gray's funeral was held on April 27 and followed by further protests and looting. Governor Hogan had pre-emptively activated the Maryland National Guard, while the Maryland State Police had activated at least 500 officers.
  • 2016 – Occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, January–February 2016. 1 killed and several dozen arrested. Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, Oregon
  • 2016 – 2016 Donald Trump Chicago rally protest, March 11. Five people arrested and two police officers injured during a demonstration at the UIC Pavilion.
  • 2016 – Democracy Spring rally in April. March to Washington D.C. and sit-ins lead to arrests.
  • 2016 – 2016 Sacramento riot, June 26, A confrontation between white nationalists and left-wing counter protesters at the California State Capitol. Ten people were hospitalized for stabbing and laceration wounds.
  • 2016 – Widespread protests erupt in response to two deaths at the hands of police, the Shooting of Alton Sterling and shooting of Philando Castile. At least 261 people were arrested in protests in New York City, Chicago, St. Paul, Baton Rouge, and other cities.
  • 2016 – 2016 Milwaukee riots, Sherman Park, August 13–15. Milwaukee, Wisconsin.
  • 2016 – 2016 Charlotte riot, September 20–21, Protests and riots break out in response to the shooting of Keith Lamont Scott by a Charlotte police officer.
  • 2016 – Dakota Access Pipeline protests, 411 protesters arrested. Multiple skirmishes with police, with vehicles, hay bales, and tires set on fire.
  • 2016 – Anti-Trump protests, Nov. 9-27. As a result of Donald Trump elected as 45th President of the U.S., thousands protested across twenty-five American cities, and unrest broke out in downtown Oakland, California, and Portland, Oregon. In Oakland, over 40 fires started and police officers were injured.
  • 2016 Portland, Oregon riots, Nov. 10-12, Protests leading to riots broke out in reaction to Trump's election. 113 arrested.
  • 2017 – Anti-Trump protests at the inauguration in Washington, D.C., January 20. Objects were thrown at police, businesses damaged, and a limousine was set on fire. More than 230 were arrested.
  • 2017 – Berkeley, California, February 1, civil unrest ensued at UC Berkeley as Milo Yiannopoulos was scheduled to speak on the campus.[2][3]
  • 2017 – 2017 Anaheim, California protests, February 21, protesters demonstrate after police officer grabs boy and fires his gun. Protesters damage property and throw bottles and rocks at police.
  • 2017 – Berkeley, California, March 4, Brawls erupt when Trump supporters and counter-protestors were attacked at the March 4 Trump rally.[4]
  • 2017 – Berkeley, California, 2017 Berkeley protests become violent when Trump supporters and protestors clashed at "Patriot's Day" rally for Trump.[5]
  • 2017 – May Day, violence breaks out at May Day protests in Olympia, and Portland, as masked anarchists damage property and clash with police.
  • 2017 – 2017 Unite the Right rally, Charlottesville, Virginia, August 11–12. At a Unite the Right rally of white nationalists and white supremacists opposing the removal of a statue of Robert E. Lee, rally attendees and counter-protesters clashed, sometimes violently. A woman was killed and 19 other injured when a rally attendee drove his car into a crowd of counterprotestors. Two law enforcement officers also died in a helicopter crash while monitoring the event. Afterward, President Trump causes backlash with "both sides" comment which was largely seen as excusing or siding with the White Nationalist and racist groups in attendance.
  • 2017 – 2017 St. Louis protests, September 15–present (December 24, 2017), protests erupted when police officer Jason Stockley was found not guilty of murder in the shooting death of Anthony Lamar Smith on December 20, 2011. Some of the protests turned violent. After declaring the protests an "unlawful assembly", police officers were pelted with water bottles and rocks. Protesters also descended upon Mayor Lyda Krewson's home, and threw bricks at the house and vandalized it. Police deployed tear gas to break up the crowd. By Monday 140 arrested.


See also

References

  1. ^ see Ronald Gottesman, and Richard Maxwell Brown, eds. Violence in America: an encyclopedia (1999).
  2. ^ "Milo Yiannopoulos talk at UC Berkeley cancelled after protests erupt". KTVU.
  3. ^ "Riot Forces Cancellation Of Yiannopoulos Talk At UC Berkeley". KPIX 5.
  4. ^ "Pro-Trump rally in Berkeley turns violent as protesters clash with the president's supporters". Washington Post. Retrieved 2017-08-22.
  5. ^ John, Paige St (2017-04-15). "21 arrested as hundreds of Trump supporters and counter-protesters clash at Berkeley rally". Los Angeles Times. ISSN 0458-3035. Retrieved 2017-08-22.

Further reading

  • Gottesman, Ronald, and Richard Maxwell Brown, eds. Violence in America: an encyclopedia (1999).
  • Graham, Hugh Davis, and Ted Robert Gurr, eds. Violence in America: Historical and comparative perspectives (1969).
  • Gurr, Ted Robert, ed. Violence in America: Protest, rebellion, reform (1979).
  • Hofstadter, Richard, and Michael Wallace, eds. American violence: A documentary history (1971).
  • Victor, Orville J. History Of American Conspiracies: A Record Of Treason, Insurrection, Rebellion, &c. In The United States Of America. From 1760 To 1860 (1863) online
This page was last edited on 19 November 2018, at 23:49
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