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List of federal judges appointed by Jimmy Carter

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Following is a list of all Article III United States federal judges appointed by President Jimmy Carter during his presidency.[1] In total Carter appointed 262 Article III federal judges, including 56 judges to the courts of appeals, 203 judges to the United States district courts, 1 judge to the United States Court of Claims and 2 judges to the United States Court of Customs and Patent Appeals. Later presidents have exceeded Carter's total number of judicial appointments, which had itself surpassed the previous record of 231 set by Richard Nixon, but Carter retains the record for the largest number of judicial appointments in a single term.

Although Carter made no appointments to the Supreme Court of the United States, two of his Court of Appeals appointees—Stephen Breyer and Ruth Bader Ginsburg—were later appointed to the Supreme Court by Bill Clinton.

Only one of Carter's appointees, Carmen Consuelo Cerezo of the District of Puerto Rico, remains on active status in the role to which Carter appointed her.

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  • ✪ The New Deal: Crash Course US History #34
  • ✪ President Carter: The White House Years
  • ✪ Judge Maryka Omatsu, Reconciling Injustices in a Pluralistic Canada
  • ✪ The Difficult Truth About Democracy and Primaries
  • ✪ Conversation Across the Divide: David French and Erwin Chemerinsky

Transcription

Episode 34 – The New Deal Hi, I’m John Green, this is CrashCourse U.S. history, and today we’re going to get a little bit controversial, as we discuss the FDR administration’s response to the Great Depression: the New Deal. That’s the National Recovery Administration, by the way, not the National Rifle Association or the No Rodents Allowed Club, which I’m a card-carrying member of. Did the New Deal end the Depression (spoiler alert: mehhh)? More controversially, did it destroy American freedom or expand the definition of liberty? In the end, was it a good thing? Mr. Green, Mr. Green. Yes. Ohh, Me from the Past, you are not qualified to make that statement. What? I was just trying to be, like, provocative and controversial. Isn’t that what gets views? You have the worst ideas about how to make people like you. But anyway, not EVERYTHING about the New Deal was controversial. This is CrashCourse, not TMZ. intro The New Deal redefined the role of the federal government for most Americans and it led to a re-alignment of the constituents in the Democratic Party, the so-called New Deal coalition. (Good job with the naming there, historians.) And regardless of whether you think the New Deal meant more freedom for more people or was a plot by red shirt wearing Communists, the New Deal is extremely important in American history. Wait a second. I’m wearing a red shirt. What are you trying to say about me, Stan? As the owner of the means of production, I demand that you dock the wages of the writer who made that joke. So after his mediocre response to the Great Depression, Herbert Hoover did not have any chance of winning the presidential election of 1932, but he also ran like he didn’t actually want the job. Plus, his opponent was Franklin Delano Roosevelt, who was as close to a born politician as the United States has ever seen, except for Kid President. The phrase New Deal came from FDR’s campaign, and when he was running FDR suggested that it was the government’s responsibility to guarantee every man a right to make a comfortable living, but he didn’t say HOW he meant to accomplish this. Like, it wasn’t gonna come from government spending, since FDR was calling for a balanced budget and criticizing Hoover for spending so much. Maybe it would somehow magically happen if we made alcohol legal again and one thing FDR did call for was an end to Prohibition, which was a campaign promise he kept. After three years of Great Depression, many Americans seriously needed a drink, and the government sought tax revenue, so no more Prohibition. FDR won 57% of the vote and the Democrats took control of Congress for the first time in a decade. While FDR gets most of the credit, he didn’t actually create the New Deal or put it into effect. It was passed by Congress. So WTFDR was the New Deal? Basically, it was a set of government programs intended to fix the depression and prevent future depressions. There are a couple of ways historians conceptualize it. One is to categorize the programs by their function. This is where we see the New Deal described as three R’s. The relief programs gave help, usually money, to poor people in need. Recovery programs were intended to fix the economy in the short run and put people back to work. And lastly, the Run DMC program was designed to increase the sales of Adidas shoes. No, alas, it was reform programs that were designed to regulate the economy in the future to prevent future depression. But some of the programs, like Social Security, don’t fit easily into one category, and there are some blurred lines between recovery and reform. Like, how do you categorize the bank holiday and the Emergency Banking Act of March 1933, for example? FDR’s order to close the banks temporarily also created the FDIC, which insures individual deposits against future banking disasters. By the way, we still have all that stuff, but was it recovery, because it helped the short-term economy by making more stable banks, or was it reform because federal deposit insurance prevents bank runs? A second way to think about the New Deal is to divide it into phases, which historians with their A number one naming creativity call the First and Second New Deal. This more chronological approach indicates that there has to be some kind of cause and effect thing going on because otherwise why would there be a second New Deal if the first one worked so perfectly? The First New Deal comprises Roosevelt’s programs before 1935, many of which were passed in the first hundred days of his presidency. It turns out that when it comes to getting our notoriously gridlocked Congress to pass legislation, nothing motivates like crisis and fear. Stan can I get the foreshadowing filter? We may see this again. So, in a brief break from its trademark obstructionism, Congress passed laws establishing the Civilian Conservation Corps, which paid young people to build national parks, the Agricultural Adjustment Act, the Glass Stegall act, which barred commercial banks from buying and selling stocks, and the National Industrial Recovery Act. Which established the National Recovery Administration, which has lightening bolts in its claws. The NRA was designed to be government planners and business leaders working together to coordinate industry standards for production, prices, and working conditions. But that whole public-private cooperation idea wasn’t much immediate help to many of the starving unemployed, so the Hundred Days reluctantly included the Federal Emergency Relief Administration, to give welfare payments to people who were desperate. Alright. Let’s go to the ThoughtBubble. Roosevelt worried about people becoming dependent on relief handouts, and preferred programs that created temporary jobs. One section of the NIRA created the Public Works Administration, which appropriated $33 billion to build stuff like the Triborough Bridge. So much for a balanced budget. The Civil Works Administration, launched in November 1933 and eventually employed 4 million people building bridges, schools, and airports. Government intervention reached its highest point however in the Tennessee Valley Authority. This program built a series of dams in the Tennessee River Valley to control floods, prevent deforestation, and provide cheap electric power to people in rural counties in seven southern states. But, despite all that sweet sweet electricity, the TVA was really controversial because it put the government in direct competition with private companies. Other than the NIRA, few acts were as contentious as the Agricultural Adjustment Act. The AAA basically gave the government the power to try to raise farm prices by setting production quotas and paying farmers to plant less food. This seemed ridiculous to the hungry Americans who watched as 6 million pigs were slaughtered and not made into bacon. Wait, Stan, 6 million pigs? But…bacon is good for me... Only property owning farmers actually saw the benefits of the AAA, so most African American farmers who were tenants or sharecroppers continued to suffer. And the suffering was especially acute in Oklahoma, Texas, Kansas, and Colorado, where drought created the Dust Bowl. All this direct government intervention in the economy was too much for the Supreme Court. In 1936 the court struck down the AAA in U.S. v. Butler. Earlier in the Schechter Poultry case (AKA the sick chicken case - finally a Supreme Court case with an interesting name) the court invalidated the NIRA because its regulations “delegated legislative powers to the president and attempted to regulate local businesses that did not engage in interstate commerce.”[1] Thanks, ThoughtBubble. So with the Supreme Court invalidating acts left and right, it looked like the New Deal was about to unravel. FDR responded by proposing a law that would allow him to appoint new Supreme Court justices if sitting justices reached the age of 70 and failed to retire. Now, this was totally constitutional – you can go ahead at the Constitution, if Nicolas Cage hasn’t already swiped it – but it seemed like such a blatant power grab that Roosevelt’s plan to “pack the court” brought on a huge backlash. Stop everything. I’ve just been informed that Nicolas Cage stole the Declaration of Independence not the Constitution. I want to apologize to Nic Cage himself and also everyone involved in the National Treasure franchise, which is truly a national treasure. Anyway, in the end, the Supreme Court began upholding the New Deal laws, starting a new era of Supreme Court jurisprudence in which the government regulation of the economy was allowed under a very broad reading of the commerce clause. Because really isn’t all commerce interstate commerce? I mean if I go to Jimmy John’s, don’t I exit the state of hungry and enter the state of satisfied? Thus began the Second New Deal shifting focus away from recovery and towards economic security. Two laws stand out for their far-reaching effects here, the National Labor Relations Act, also called the Wagner Act, and the Social Security Act. The Wagner Act guaranteed workers the right to unionize and it created a National Labor Relations Board to hear disputes over unfair labor practices. In 1934 alone there were more than 2,000 strikes, including one that involved 400,000 textile workers. Oh, it’s time for the Mystery Document? Man, I wish there were a union to prevent me from getting electrocuted. The rules here are simple. I guess the author of the Mystery Document. And I’m usually wrong and get shocked. “Refusing to allow people to be paid less than a living wage preserves to us our own market. There is absolutely no use in producing anything if you gradually reduce the number of people able to buy even the cheapest products. The only way to preserve our markets is an adequate wage.” Uh I mean you usually don’t make it this easy, but I’m going to guess that it’s Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Dang it! Eleanor Roosevelt? Eleanor. Of course it was Eleanor. Gah! The most important union during the 1930s was the Congress of Industrial Organizations, which set out to unionize entire industries like steel manufacturing and automobile workers. In 1936 the United Auto Workers launched a new tactic called the sit-down strike. Workers at the Fisher Body Plant in Flint, Michigan simply stopped working, sat down, and occupied the plant. Eventually GM agreed to negotiate, and the UAW won. Union membership rose to 9 million people as “CIO unions helped to stabilize a chaotic employment situation and offered members a sense of dignity and freedom.”[2] That quote, by the way, is from our old buddy Eric Foner. God, I love you, Foner. And unions played an important role in shaping the ideology of the second New Deal because they insisted that the economic downturn had been caused by underconsumption, and that the best way to combat the depression was to raise workers’ wages so that they could buy lots of stuff. The thinking went that if people experienced less economic insecurity, they would spend more of their money so there were widespread calls for public housing and universal health insurance. And that brings us to the crowning achievement of the Second New Deal, and/or the crowning achievement of its Communist plot, the Social Security Act of 1935. Social Security included unemployment insurance, aid to the disabled, aid to poor families with children, and, of course, retirement benefits. It was, and is, funded through payroll taxes rather than general tax revenue, and while state and local governments retained a lot of discretion over how benefits would be distributed, Social Security still represented a transformation in the relationship between the federal government and American citizens. Like, before the New Deal, most Americans didn’t expect the government to help them in times of economic distress. After the New Deal the question was no longer if the government should intervene, but how it should. For a while, the U.S. government under FDR embraced Keynesian economics, the idea that the government should spend money even if it means going into deficits in order to prop up demand. And this meant that the state was much more present in people’s lives. I mean for some people that meant relief or social security checks. For others, it meant a job with the most successful government employment program, the Works Progress Administration. The WPA didn’t just build post offices, it paid painters to make them beautiful with murals, it paid actors and writers to put together plays, and ultimately employed more than 3 million Americans each year until it ended in 1943. It also, by the way, payed for lots of photographers to take amazing photographs, which we can show you for free because they are owned by the government so I’m just going to keep talking about how great they are. Oh, look at that one, that’s a winner. Okay. Equally transformative, if less visually stimulating, was the change that the New Deal brought to American politics. The popularity of FDR and his programs brought together urban progressives who would have been Republicans two decades earlier, with unionized workers - often immigrants, left wing intellectuals, urban Catholics and Jews. FDR also gained the support of middle class homeowners, and he brought African Americans into the Democratic Party. Who was left to be a Republican, Stan? I guess there weren’t many, which is why FDR kept getting re-elected until, you know, he died. But, fascinatingly, one of the biggest and politically most important blocs in the New Deal Coalition was white southerners, many of whom were extremely racist. Democrats had dominated in the South since the end of reconstruction, you know since the other party was the party of Lincoln. And all those Southern democrats who had been in Congress for so long became important legislative leaders. In fact, without them, FDR never could have passed the New Deal laws, but Southerners expected whites to dominate the government and the economy and they insisted on local administration of many New Deal programs. And that ensured that the AAA and the NLRA would exclude sharecroppers, and tenant farmers, and domestic servants, all of whom were disproportionately African American. So, did the New Deal end the depression? No. I mean, by 1940 over 15% of the American workforce remained unemployed. But, then again, when FDR took office in 1933, the unemployment rate was at 25%. Maybe the best evidence that government spending was working is that when FDR reduced government subsidies to farms and the WPA in 1937, unemployment immediately jumped back up to almost 20%. And many economic historians believe that it’s inaccurate to say that government spending failed to end the Depression because in the end, at least according to a lot of economists, what brought the Depression to an end was a massive government spending program called World War II. So, given that, is the New Deal really that important? Yes. Because first, it changed the shape of the American Democratic Party. African Americans and union workers became reliable Democratic votes. And secondly, it changed our way of thinking. Like, liberalism in the 19th century meant limited government and free-market economics. Roosevelt used the term to refer to a large, active state that saw liberty as “greater security for the average man.” And that idea that liberty is more closely linked to security than it is to, like, freedom from government intervention is still really important in the way we think about liberty today. No matter where they fall on the contemporary political spectrum, politicians are constantly talking about keeping Americans safe. Also our tendency to associate the New Deal with FDR himself points to what Arthur Schlessinger called the “imperial presidency.” That is, we tend to associate all government policy with the president. Like, after Jackson and Lincoln’s presidencies Congress reasserted itself as the most important branch of the government. But that didn’t happen after FDR. But above all that, the New Deal changed the expectations that Americans had of their government. Now, when things go sour, we expect the government to do something. We’ll give our last words today to Eric Foner, who never Foner-s it in, the New Deal “made the government an institution directly experienced in Americans’ daily lives and directly concerned with their welfare.”[3] Thanks for watching. I’ll see you next week. Crash Course is made with the help of all of these nice people. And it is possible because of your support at subbable.com. Here at Crash Course we want to make educational video for free, for everyone, forever. And that’s possible thanks to your subscription at subbable.com. You can make a monthly subscription and the price is up to you. It can even be zero dollars although more is better. Thanks so much for watching Crash Course and as we say in my hometown, don’t forget to be awesome. ________________ [1] Foner. Give me Liberty ebook version p. 870 [2] Foner. Give me Liberty ebook version p. 873 [3] Give me Liberty ebook version p. 898

Contents

Courts of Appeals

# Judge Circuit Nomination
date
Confirmation
date
Began active
service
Ended active
service
Ended senior
status
1 Procter Ralph Hug Jr. Ninth August 29, 1977 September 15, 1977 September 15, 1977 January 1, 2002 November 30, 2017
2 Alvin Benjamin Rubin Fifth August 16, 1977 September 16, 1977 September 19, 1977 July 1, 1989 June 11, 1991
3 Hugh H. Bownes First September 19, 1977 October 7, 1977 October 11, 1977 January 1, 1990 November 5, 2003
4 A. Leon Higginbotham Jr. Third September 19, 1977 October 7, 1977 October 11, 1977 January 31, 1991 March 5, 1993
5 Thomas Tang Ninth August 29, 1977 October 7, 1977 October 12, 1977 October 12, 1993 July 18, 1995
6 Damon Keith Sixth September 28, 1977 October 20, 1977 October 21, 1977 May 1, 1995 April 28, 2019
7 Gilbert S. Merritt Jr. Sixth August 25, 1977 October 29, 1977 October 31, 1977 January 17, 2001 Incumbent
8 Monroe G. McKay Tenth November 2, 1977 November 29, 1977 December 1, 1977 December 31, 1993 Incumbent
9 Robert Smith Vance Fifth / Eleventh November 4, 1977 December 15, 1977 December 15, 1977 December 16, 1989[2]
10 James Kenneth Logan Tenth November 4, 1977 December 15, 1977 December 16, 1977 August 31, 1994 July 15, 1998
11 James Dickson Phillips Jr. Fourth July 20, 1978 August 11, 1978 August 11, 1978 July 31, 1994 August 27, 2017
12 Theodore McMillian Eighth August 3, 1978 September 22, 1978 September 23, 1978 July 1, 2003 January 18, 2006
13 Phyllis A. Kravitch Fifth / Eleventh January 19, 1979 March 21, 1979 March 23, 1979 December 31, 1996[2] June 15, 2017
14 Frank Minis Johnson Fifth / Eleventh April 2, 1979 June 19, 1979 June 21, 1979 October 30, 1991[2] July 23, 1999
15 Amalya Lyle Kearse Second May 3, 1979 June 19, 1979 June 21, 1979 June 11, 2002 Incumbent
16 Jon O. Newman Second April 30, 1979 June 19, 1979 June 21, 1979 July 1, 1997 Incumbent
17 Dolores Sloviter Third April 4, 1979 June 19, 1979 June 21, 1979 June 21, 2013 Incumbent
18 R. Lanier Anderson III Fifth / Eleventh April 18, 1979 July 12, 1979 July 13, 1979 January 31, 2009[2] Incumbent
19 Reynaldo Guerra Garza Fifth April 30, 1979 July 12, 1979 July 13, 1979 July 7, 1982 September 14, 2004
20 Joseph Woodrow Hatchett Fifth / Eleventh May 17, 1979 July 12, 1979 July 13, 1979 May 14, 1999[2]
21 Albert John Henderson Fifth / Eleventh April 18, 1979 July 12, 1979 July 13, 1979 January 31, 1986[2] May 11, 1999
22 Carolyn Dineen King Fifth April 30, 1979 July 12, 1979 July 13, 1979 December 31, 2013 Incumbent
23 Francis Dominic Murnaghan Jr. Fourth May 8, 1979 July 12, 1979 July 13, 1979 August 31, 2000
24 Henry Anthony Politz Fifth May 3, 1979 July 12, 1979 July 13, 1979 August 10, 1999 May 25, 2002
25 Thomas Morrow Reavley Fifth May 17, 1979 July 12, 1979 July 13, 1979 August 1, 1990 Incumbent
26 Patricia Wald D.C. April 30, 1979 July 24, 1979 July 26, 1979 November 16, 1999
27 James Marshall Sprouse Fourth July 5, 1979 September 11, 1979 September 13, 1979 October 31, 1992 July 31, 1995
28 Bailey Brown Sixth March 15, 1979 September 25, 1979 September 26, 1979 June 16, 1982 December 31, 1997
29 Richard Dickson Cudahy Seventh May 22, 1979 September 25, 1979 September 26, 1979 August 15, 1994 September 22, 2015
30 Betty Binns Fletcher Ninth July 12, 1979 September 26, 1979 September 26, 1979 November 1, 1998 October 22, 2012
31 Cornelia Groefsema Kennedy Sixth April 9, 1979 September 25, 1979 September 26, 1979 March 1, 1999 May 12, 2014
32 Boyce F. Martin Jr. Sixth June 5, 1979 September 25, 1979 September 26, 1979 August 16, 2013
33 Abner Mikva D.C. May 29, 1979 September 25, 1979 September 26, 1979 September 19, 1994
34 Mary M. Schroeder Ninth May 3, 1979 September 25, 1979 September 26, 1979 December 31, 2011 Incumbent
35 Otto Richard Skopil Jr. Ninth June 14, 1979 September 25, 1979 September 26, 1979 June 30, 1986 October 18, 2012
36 Joseph Jerome Farris Ninth July 12, 1979 September 26, 1979 September 27, 1979 March 4, 1995 Incumbent
37 Samuel D. Johnson Jr. Fifth August 10, 1979 October 4, 1979 October 5, 1979 May 10, 1991 July 27, 2002
38 Nathaniel R. Jones Sixth August 28, 1979 October 4, 1979 October 5, 1979 May 13, 1995 March 30, 2002
39 Albert Tate Jr. Fifth July 31, 1979 October 4, 1979 October 5, 1979 March 27, 1986
40 Arthur Lawrence Alarcon Ninth August 28, 1979 October 31, 1979 November 2, 1979 November 21, 1992 January 28, 2015
41 Thomas Alonzo Clark Fifth / Eleventh August 28, 1979 October 31, 1979 November 2, 1979 August 31, 1991[2] September 4, 2005
42 Harry Pregerson Ninth August 28, 1979 October 31, 1979 November 2, 1979 December 11, 2015 November 25, 2017
43 Stephanie Kulp Seymour Tenth August 28, 1979 October 31, 1979 November 2, 1979 October 16, 2005 Incumbent
44 Warren J. Ferguson Ninth September 28, 1979 November 26, 1979 November 27, 1979 July 31, 1986 June 25, 2008
45 Cecil F. Poole Ninth October 11, 1979 November 26, 1979 November 27, 1979 January 15, 1996 November 12, 1997
46 Dorothy Wright Nelson Ninth September 28, 1979 December 19, 1979 December 20, 1979 January 1, 1995 Incumbent
47 Richard S. Arnold Eighth December 19, 1979 February 20, 1980 February 20, 1980 April 1, 2001 September 23, 2004
48 Harry T. Edwards D.C. December 6, 1979 February 20, 1980 February 20, 1980 November 3, 2005 Incumbent
49 William Canby Ninth April 2, 1980 May 21, 1980 May 23, 1980 May 23, 1996 Incumbent
50 Samuel James Ervin III Fourth April 2, 1980 May 21, 1980 May 23, 1980 September 18, 1999
51 Robert Boochever Ninth May 22, 1980 June 18, 1980 June 18, 1980 June 10, 1986 October 9, 2011
52 Ruth Bader Ginsburg D.C. April 14, 1980 June 18, 1980 June 18, 1980 August 9, 1993 Elevated
53 William Albert Norris Ninth February 27, 1980 June 18, 1980 June 18, 1980 July 7, 1994 October 24, 1997
54 Jerre Stockton Williams Fifth April 14, 1980 June 18, 1980 June 18, 1980 July 2, 1990 August 29, 1993
55 Stephen Reinhardt Ninth November 30, 1979 September 11, 1980 September 11, 1980 March 29, 2018
56 Stephen Breyer First November 13, 1980 December 9, 1980 December 10, 1980 August 2, 1994 Elevated

District Courts

# Judge Court
[Note 1]
Nomination
date
Confirmation
date
Began active
service
Ended active
service
Ended senior
status
1 Howell W. Melton M.D. Fla. March 29, 1977 April 25, 1977 April 26, 1977 February 1, 1991 December 18, 2015
2 William Hoeveler S.D. Fla. April 5, 1977 April 25, 1977 April 26, 1977 January 31, 1991 November 18, 2017
3 Finis E. Cowan S.D. Tex. May 19, 1977 June 13, 1977 June 14, 1977 June 30, 1979
4 Francis Joseph Boyle D.R.I. May 2, 1977 June 30, 1977 July 1, 1977 December 1, 1992 September 11, 2006
5 Russell Gentry Clark W.D. Mo. June 13, 1977 July 1, 1977 July 5, 1977 August 1, 1991 July 31, 2000
6 Edward Louis Filippine E.D. Mo. June 22, 1977 July 21, 1977 July 22, 1977 June 11, 1995 Incumbent
7 Harold Lloyd Murphy N.D. Ga. July 7, 1977 July 28, 1977 July 29, 1977 March 31, 2017 Incumbent
8 T. F. Gilroy Daly D. Conn. June 29, 1977 August 5, 1977 August 5, 1977 July 11, 1996
9 Earl Ernest Veron W.D. La. July 19, 1977 August 4, 1977 August 5, 1977 February 13, 1990 August 28, 1990
10 Harry H. MacLaughlin D. Minn. August 4, 1977 September 16, 1977 September 19, 1977 October 1, 1992 May 3, 2005
11 Nicholas John Bua N.D. Ill. July 19, 1977 October 7, 1977 October 11, 1977 November 4, 1991
12 Edward Huggins Johnstone W.D. Ky. August 25, 1977 October 7, 1977 October 11, 1977 October 22, 1993 June 26, 2013
13 Louis F. Oberdorfer D.D.C. September 16, 1977 October 7, 1977 October 11, 1977 July 31, 1992 February 21, 2013
14 Stanley Julian Roszkowski N.D. Ill. July 19, 1977 October 7, 1977 October 11, 1977 January 9, 1991 January 31, 1998
15 Thomas Austin Ballantine Jr. W.D. Ky. September 27, 1977 October 12, 1977 October 12, 1977 November 29, 1991 February 18, 1992
16 Charles Proctor Sifton E.D.N.Y. August 16, 1977 October 12, 1977 October 12, 1977 March 18, 2000 November 9, 2009
17 Eugene Nickerson E.D.N.Y. August 16, 1977 October 20, 1977 October 21, 1977 January 1, 1994 January 1, 2002
18 Pierre N. Leval S.D.N.Y. October 17, 1977 October 29, 1977 October 31, 1977 November 8, 1993 Elevated
19 Elsijane Trimble Roy E.D. Ark.
W.D. Ark.
October 21, 1977 November 1, 1977 November 2, 1977 January 1, 1989 January 23, 2007
December 1, 1990[3]
20 George C. Carr M.D. Fla. November 21, 1977 December 15, 1977 December 16, 1977 January 26, 1990
21 John L. Kane Jr. D. Colo. November 2, 1977 December 15, 1977 December 16, 1977 April 8, 1988 Incumbent
22 A. David Mazzone D. Mass. January 26, 1978 February 7, 1978 February 10, 1978 June 3, 1993 October 25, 2004
23 Paul Allen Simmons W.D. Pa. January 26, 1978 April 6, 1978 April 7, 1978 June 1, 1990 October 9, 2014
24 Robert W. Sweet S.D.N.Y. February 17, 1978 April 25, 1978 April 28, 1978 March 1, 1991 March 24, 2019
25 Gustave Diamond W.D. Pa. March 22, 1978 May 1, 1978 May 2, 1978 January 31, 1994 Incumbent
26 Donald Emil Ziegler W.D. Pa. March 22, 1978 May 1, 1978 May 2, 1978 October 1, 2001 May 31, 2003
27 Ellen Bree Burns D. Conn. February 15, 1978 May 17, 1978 May 18, 1978 September 1, 1992 June 3, 2019
28 Robert Frederick Collins E.D. La. January 26, 1978 May 17, 1978 May 19, 1978 August 6, 1993
29 Harold H. Greene D.D.C. March 22, 1978 May 17, 1978 May 19, 1978 August 6, 1995 January 29, 2000
30 Leonard B. Sand S.D.N.Y. April 7, 1978 May 17, 1978 May 19, 1978 July 1, 1993 December 3, 2016
31 Jack Edward Tanner E.D. Wash.
W.D. Wash.
January 20, 1978 May 17, 1978 May 19, 1978 November 8, 1978[4]
January 28, 1991

January 10, 2006
32 Adrian G. Duplantier E.D. La. April 24, 1978 May 26, 1978 May 31, 1978 March 6, 1994 August 15, 2007
33 Shane Devine D.N.H. May 17, 1978 June 23, 1978 June 27, 1978 September 8, 1992 February 22, 1999
34 Mary Johnson Lowe S.D.N.Y. May 10, 1978 June 23, 1978 June 27, 1978 July 27, 1991 February 27, 1999
35 Santiago E. Campos D.N.M. June 2, 1978 July 10, 1978 July 12, 1978 December 26, 1992 January 20, 2001
36 Louis H. Pollak E.D. Pa. June 7, 1978 July 10, 1978 July 12, 1978 January 1, 1991 May 8, 2012
37 Jose Alejandro Gonzalez Jr. S.D. Fla. July 6, 1978 July 26, 1978 July 28, 1978 November 30, 1996 Incumbent
38 Harry E. Claiborne D. Nev. July 25, 1978 August 11, 1978 August 11, 1978 October 9, 1986
39 Norma Levy Shapiro E.D. Pa. August 1, 1978 August 11, 1978 August 11, 1978 December 31, 1998 July 22, 2016
40 Thomas A. Wiseman Jr. M.D. Tenn. August 1, 1978 August 11, 1978 August 11, 1978 November 3, 1995 Incumbent
41 Richard S. Arnold E.D. Ark.
W.D. Ark.
August 14, 1978 September 20, 1978 September 22, 1978 March 7, 1980 Elevated
42 Bruce Sterling Jenkins D. Utah August 28, 1978 September 20, 1978 September 22, 1978 September 30, 1994 Incumbent
43 Harold A. Baker E.D. Ill. August 9, 1978 September 22, 1978 September 23, 1978 March 31, 1979[5]
44 Patricia Boyle E.D. Mich. July 25, 1978 September 22, 1978 September 23, 1978 April 20, 1983
45 Julian Abele Cook Jr. E.D. Mich. July 25, 1978 September 22, 1978 September 23, 1978 December 30, 1996 May 16, 2017
46 Mariana Pfaelzer C.D. Cal. August 8, 1978 September 22, 1978 September 23, 1978 December 31, 1997 May 14, 2015
47 Donald Eugene O'Brien N.D. Iowa
S.D. Iowa
September 27, 1978 October 4, 1978 October 5, 1978 December 30, 1992
December 1, 1990[6]
August 18, 2015
48 Berry Avant Edenfield S.D. Ga. September 27, 1978 October 10, 1978 October 11, 1978 August 2, 2006 May 9, 2015
49 Robert Keeton D. Mass. January 25, 1979 March 21, 1979 March 23, 1979 February 28, 2003 September 8, 2006
50 John Joseph McNaught D. Mass. January 25, 1979 March 21, 1979 March 23, 1979 February 1, 1991
51 David Sutherland Nelson D. Mass. January 25, 1979 March 21, 1979 March 23, 1979 September 27, 1991 October 21, 1998
52 John Garrett Penn D.D.C. January 19, 1979 March 21, 1979 March 23, 1979 March 31, 1998 September 9, 2007
53 Abraham David Sofaer S.D.N.Y. January 19, 1979 March 21, 1979 March 23, 1979 June 9, 1985
54 Rya W. Zobel D. Mass. January 25, 1979 March 21, 1979 March 23, 1979 April 1, 2014 Incumbent
55 David Owen Belew Jr. N.D. Tex. February 9, 1979 April 24, 1979 April 26, 1979 May 7, 1990 November 21, 2001
56 Martin F. Loughlin D.N.H. February 9, 1979 April 24, 1979 April 26, 1979 May 15, 1989 December 4, 1995
57 Robert Manley Parker E.D. Tex. February 6, 1979 April 24, 1979 April 26, 1979 June 17, 1994 Elevated
58 Mary Lou Robinson N.D. Tex. February 23, 1979 April 24, 1979 April 26, 1979 February 11, 2016 January 26, 2019
59 Barefoot Sanders N.D. Tex. February 6, 1979 April 24, 1979 April 26, 1979 January 1, 1996 September 21, 2008
60 Paul G. Hatfield D. Mont. March 15, 1979 May 9, 1979 May 10, 1979 February 9, 1996 July 3, 2000
61 Norman William Black S.D. Tex. February 23, 1979 May 10, 1979 May 11, 1979 December 6, 1996 July 23, 1997
62 George Edward Cire S.D. Tex. February 13, 1979 May 10, 1979 May 11, 1979 May 5, 1985
63 James DeAnda S.D. Tex. February 13, 1979 May 10, 1979 May 11, 1979 October 1, 1992
64 Joyce Hens Green D.D.C. March 6, 1979 May 10, 1979 May 11, 1979 July 1, 1995 Incumbent
65 George P. Kazen S.D. Tex. March 7, 1979 May 10, 1979 May 11, 1979 May 31, 2009 March 9, 2018
66 Gabrielle Kirk McDonald S.D. Tex. February 27, 1979 May 10, 1979 May 11, 1979 August 14, 1988
67 William Overton E.D. Ark. March 7, 1979 May 10, 1979 May 11, 1979 July 14, 1987
68 Donald James Porter D.S.D. March 15, 1979 May 10, 1979 May 11, 1979 March 16, 1992 February 17, 2003
69 Harold Duane Vietor S.D. Iowa March 15, 1979 May 10, 1979 May 11, 1979 December 29, 1996 July 23, 2016
70 Valdemar Aguirre Cordova D. Ariz. April 30, 1979 June 19, 1979 June 21, 1979 June 18, 1988
71 Marvin E. Aspen N.D. Ill. April 30, 1979 July 23, 1979 July 24, 1979 July 1, 2002 Incumbent
72 Susan H. Black M.D. Fla. May 22, 1979 July 23, 1979 July 24, 1979 September 3, 1992 Elevated
73 William J. Castagna M.D. Fla. June 5, 1979 July 23, 1979 July 24, 1979 June 29, 1992 Incumbent
74 Richard Paul Conaboy M.D. Pa. May 29, 1979 July 23, 1979 July 24, 1979 September 1, 1992 November 9, 2018
75 Warren William Eginton D. Conn. June 5, 1979 July 23, 1979 July 24, 1979 August 1, 1992 October 7, 2019
76 Orinda Dale Evans N.D. Ga. June 5, 1979 July 23, 1979 July 24, 1979 December 31, 2008 Incumbent
77 Lawrence K. Karlton E.D. Cal. June 5, 1979 July 23, 1979 July 24, 1979 May 28, 2000 July 11, 2015
78 James Byron Moran N.D. Ill. May 22, 1979 July 23, 1979 July 24, 1979 June 30, 1995 April 21, 2009
79 Sylvia H. Rambo M.D. Pa. May 29, 1979 July 23, 1979 July 24, 1979 April 18, 2001 Incumbent
80 Marvin Herman Shoob N.D. Ga. June 5, 1979 July 23, 1979 July 24, 1979 September 30, 1991 June 12, 2017
81 George Ernest Tidwell N.D. Ga. June 5, 1979 July 23, 1979 July 24, 1979 October 8, 1999 August 4, 2011
82 Robert L. Vining Jr. N.D. Ga. June 14, 1979 July 23, 1979 July 24, 1979 March 31, 1996 Incumbent
83 Robert Jackson Staker S.D. W. Va. June 14, 1979 September 11, 1979 September 13, 1979 December 31, 1994 September 30, 2005
84 Matthew J. Perry D.S.C. July 5, 1979 September 19, 1979 September 20, 1979 October 1, 1995 July 29, 2011
85 George Arceneaux Jr. E.D. La. June 12, 1979 September 25, 1979 September 26, 1979 April 6, 1993
86 Richard Bilby D. Ariz. June 5, 1979 September 25, 1979 September 26, 1979 May 29, 1996 August 11, 1998
87 Patrick Eugene Carr E.D. La. June 14, 1979 September 25, 1979 September 26, 1979 October 1, 1991 June 1, 1998
88 Jim Carrigan D. Colo. June 1, 1979 September 25, 1979 September 26, 1979 October 10, 1994 August 19, 1995
89 Avern Cohn E.D. Mich. May 17, 1979 September 25, 1979 September 26, 1979 October 9, 1999 Incumbent
90 Benjamin F. Gibson W.D. Mich. July 12, 1979 September 25, 1979 September 26, 1979 July 13, 1996 January 31, 1999
91 Falcon Black Hawkins Jr. D.S.C. June 5, 1979 September 25, 1979 September 26, 1979 October 1, 1993 July 20, 2005
92 Douglas Woodruff Hillman W.D. Mich. July 12, 1979 September 25, 1979 September 26, 1979 February 15, 1991 October 1, 2002
93 Charles Weston Houck D.S.C. June 5, 1979 September 25, 1979 September 26, 1979 October 1, 2003 July 19, 2017
94 William L. Hungate E.D. Mo. May 17, 1979 September 25, 1979 September 26, 1979 October 1, 1991 June 30, 1992
95 Stewart Albert Newblatt E.D. Mich. May 17, 1979 September 25, 1979 September 26, 1979 December 23, 1993 Incumbent
96 John Victor Parker M.D. La. May 24, 1979 September 25, 1979 September 26, 1979 October 31, 1998 July 14, 2014
97 Edward Cornelius Reed Jr. D. Nev. April 12, 1979 September 25, 1979 September 26, 1979 July 15, 1992 June 1, 2013
98 Howard F. Sachs W.D. Mo. May 17, 1979 September 25, 1979 September 26, 1979 October 31, 1992 Incumbent
99 John Malach Shaw W.D. La. June 5, 1979 September 25, 1979 September 26, 1979 November 15, 1996 December 24, 1999
100 Zita Leeson Weinshienk D. Colo. June 1, 1979 September 25, 1979 September 26, 1979 April 3, 1998 March 31, 2011
101 Veronica DiCarlo Wicker E.D. La. June 5, 1979 September 25, 1979 September 26, 1979 December 10, 1994
102 Scott Olin Wright W.D. Mo. May 24, 1979 September 25, 1979 September 26, 1979 October 5, 1991 July 11, 2016
103 William Louis Beatty S.D. Ill. July 31, 1979 October 4, 1979 October 5, 1979 November 9, 1992 July 22, 2001
104 Gene Edward Brooks S.D. Ind. July 27, 1979 October 4, 1979 October 5, 1979 December 31, 1996
105 Jerry Buchmeyer N.D. Tex. August 3, 1979 October 4, 1979 October 5, 1979 September 5, 2003 September 21, 2009
106 Edward B. Davis S.D. Fla. August 10, 1979 October 4, 1979 October 5, 1979 June 30, 2000
107 Hugh Gibson S.D. Tex. July 31, 1979 October 4, 1979 October 5, 1979 November 1, 1989 June 18, 1998
108 Lynn Carlton Higby N.D. Fla. June 14, 1979 October 4, 1979 October 5, 1979 January 3, 1983
109 Joseph C. Howard Sr. D. Md. May 22, 1979 October 4, 1979 October 5, 1979 November 15, 1991 September 16, 2000
110 Shirley Brannock Jones D. Md. May 22, 1979 October 4, 1979 October 5, 1979 December 31, 1982
111 James W. Kehoe S.D. Fla. July 18, 1979 October 4, 1979 October 5, 1979 October 16, 1992 December 13, 1998
112 George J. Mitchell D. Me. July 31, 1979 October 4, 1979 October 5, 1979 May 16, 1980
113 James Carriger Paine S.D. Fla. July 12, 1979 October 4, 1979 October 5, 1979 May 20, 1992 March 7, 2010
114 Eugene P. Spellman S.D. Fla. July 21, 1979 October 4, 1979 October 5, 1979 May 4, 1991
115 Harold A. Ackerman D.N.J. September 28, 1979 October 31, 1979 November 2, 1979 February 15, 1994 December 2, 2009
116 Alan Neil Bloch W.D. Pa. August 3, 1979 October 31, 1979 November 2, 1979 April 12, 1997 Incumbent
117 Thomas Rutherford Brett N.D. Okla. September 28, 1979 October 31, 1979 November 2, 1979 October 3, 1996 February 1, 2003
118 Juan Guerrero Burciaga D.N.M. July 19, 1979 October 31, 1979 November 2, 1979 November 9, 1994 March 5, 1995
119 Barbara Brandriff Crabb W.D. Wis. July 21, 1979 October 31, 1979 November 2, 1979 March 24, 2010 Incumbent
120 Dickinson R. Debevoise D.N.J. September 28, 1979 October 31, 1979 November 2, 1979 May 1, 1994 August 14, 2015
121 James O. Ellison N.D. Okla. September 28, 1979 October 31, 1979 November 2, 1979 November 7, 1994 November 22, 2014
122 Terence T. Evans E.D. Wis. July 21, 1979 October 31, 1979 November 2, 1979 August 11, 1995 Elevated
123 Robert Howell Hall N.D. Ga. September 28, 1979 October 31, 1979 November 2, 1979 December 31, 1990 October 14, 1995
124 Alcee Hastings S.D. Fla. August 28, 1979 October 31, 1979 November 2, 1979 October 20, 1989
125 Neal Peters McCurn N.D.N.Y. September 28, 1979 October 31, 1979 November 2, 1979 April 6, 1993 September 7, 2014
126 Scott Elgin Reed E.D. Ky. August 28, 1979 October 31, 1979 November 2, 1979 August 1, 1988 February 17, 1994
127 Dale E. Saffels D. Kan. September 28, 1979 October 31, 1979 November 2, 1979 November 16, 1990 November 14, 2002
128 H. Lee Sarokin D.N.J. September 28, 1979 October 31, 1979 November 2, 1979 October 5, 1994 Elevated
129 Frank Howell Seay E.D. Okla. September 28, 1979 October 31, 1979 November 2, 1979 September 25, 2003 Incumbent
130 Anna Diggs Taylor E.D. Mich. May 17, 1979 October 31, 1979 November 2, 1979 December 31, 1998 November 4, 2017
131 Anne Elise Thompson D.N.J. September 28, 1979 October 31, 1979 November 2, 1979 June 1, 2001 Incumbent
132 Lee Roy West W.D. Okla. September 28, 1979 October 31, 1979 November 2, 1979 November 26, 1994 Incumbent
133 Peter Hill Beer E.D. La. October 11, 1979 November 26, 1979 November 27, 1979 April 12, 1994 February 9, 2018
134 William Odis Bertelsman E.D. Ky. October 11, 1979 November 26, 1979 November 27, 1979 February 1, 2001 Incumbent
135 Dudley Hollingsworth Bowen Jr. S.D. Ga. July 19, 1979 November 26, 1979 November 27, 1979 June 25, 2006 Incumbent
136 Lucius Desha Bunton III W.D. Tex. October 11, 1979 November 26, 1979 November 27, 1979 December 1, 1992 January 17, 2001
137 James T. Giles E.D. Pa. October 11, 1979 November 26, 1979 November 27, 1979 February 11, 2008 October 3, 2008
138 Harry Lee Hudspeth W.D. Tex. October 11, 1979 November 26, 1979 November 27, 1979 June 30, 2001 January 31, 2016
139 Milton Lewis Schwartz E.D. Cal. September 28, 1979 November 26, 1979 November 27, 1979 January 20, 1990 October 3, 2005
140 Juan Pérez-Giménez D.P.R. October 23, 1979 December 5, 1979 December 6, 1979 March 28, 2006 Incumbent
141 Horace Ward N.D. Ga. November 1, 1979 December 5, 1979 December 6, 1979 December 31, 1993 April 23, 2016
142 David Kent Winder D. Utah November 1, 1979 December 4, 1979 December 6, 1979 June 8, 1997 May 19, 2009
143 José A. Cabranes D. Conn. November 6, 1979 December 5, 1979 December 10, 1979 August 12, 1994 Elevated
144 Robert James McNichols E.D. Wash. November 6, 1979 December 5, 1979 December 10, 1979 April 20, 1991 January 20, 1993
145 Terry J. Hatter Jr. C.D. Cal. September 28, 1979 December 19, 1979 December 20, 1979 April 22, 2005 Incumbent
146 Edward Dean Price E.D. Cal. November 1, 1979 December 19, 1979 December 20, 1979 December 31, 1989 November 3, 1997
147 Richard Alan Enslen W.D. Mich. November 30, 1979 December 20, 1979 December 21, 1979 September 1, 2005 February 17, 2015
148 William Matthew Kidd S.D. W. Va. November 30, 1979 December 20, 1979 December 21, 1979 January 14, 1983[7]
149 Lyonel Thomas Senter Jr. N.D. Miss. October 11, 1979 December 20, 1979 December 21, 1979 July 30, 1998 May 18, 2011
150 Helen J. Frye D. Ore. December 3, 1979 February 20, 1980 February 20, 1980 December 10, 1995 April 21, 2011
151 Gilberto Gierbolini-Ortiz D.P.R. November 30, 1979 February 20, 1980 February 20, 1980 December 27, 1993 March 23, 2004
152 Diana E. Murphy D. Minn. November 30, 1979 February 20, 1980 February 20, 1980 October 13, 1994 Elevated
153 Owen M. Panner D. Ore. December 3, 1979 February 20, 1980 February 20, 1980 July 28, 1992 December 19, 2018
154 James A. Redden D. Ore. December 3, 1979 February 20, 1980 February 20, 1980 March 13, 1995 Incumbent
155 Robert G. Renner D. Minn. November 30, 1979 February 20, 1980 February 20, 1980 February 22, 1992 March 1, 2005
156 Barbara Jacobs Rothstein W.D. Wash. December 3, 1979 February 20, 1980 February 20, 1980 September 1, 2011 Incumbent
157 Henry Woods E.D. Ark. December 14, 1979 February 20, 1980 February 20, 1980 March 1, 1995 March 14, 2002
158 Truman McGill Hobbs M.D. Ala. January 23, 1980 April 3, 1980 April 3, 1980 February 11, 1991 November 4, 2015
159 Odell Horton W.D. Tenn. February 27, 1980 May 9, 1980 May 12, 1980 May 16, 1995 February 22, 2006
160 Norma Holloway Johnson D.D.C. February 28, 1980 May 9, 1980 May 12, 1980 June 18, 2001 December 31, 2003
161 John Trice Nixon M.D. Tenn. February 27, 1980 May 9, 1980 May 12, 1980 August 15, 1998 December 19, 2019
162 George Ross Anderson Jr. D.S.C. April 18, 1980 May 21, 1980 May 23, 1980 January 29, 2009 March 1, 2016
163 William Earl Britt E.D.N.C. April 14, 1980 May 21, 1980 May 23, 1980 December 7, 1997 Incumbent
164 Clyde S. Cahill Jr. E.D. Mo. April 2, 1980 May 21, 1980 May 23, 1980 April 9, 1992 August 18, 2004
165 Charles Leach Hardy D. Ariz. April 2, 1980 May 21, 1980 May 23, 1980 June 2, 1990 December 24, 2010
166 John David Holschuh S.D. Ohio March 28, 1980 May 21, 1980 May 23, 1980 October 12, 1996 January 26, 2011
167 Patrick F. Kelly D. Kan. April 14, 1980 May 21, 1980 May 23, 1980 June 6, 1995 March 15, 1996
168 Frank Joseph Polozola M.D. La. April 2, 1980 May 21, 1980 May 23, 1980 January 15, 2007 February 24, 2013
169 Raul Anthony Ramirez E.D. Cal. December 14, 1979 May 21, 1980 May 23, 1980 December 31, 1989
170 Walter Herbert Rice S.D. Ohio April 14, 1980 May 21, 1980 May 23, 1980 November 30, 2004 Incumbent
171 Milton Shadur N.D. Ill. April 2, 1980 May 21, 1980 May 23, 1980 June 25, 1992 January 14, 2018
172 S. Arthur Spiegel S.D. Ohio April 14, 1980 May 21, 1980 May 23, 1980 June 5, 1995 December 31, 2014
173 George Washington White N.D. Ohio March 28, 1980 May 21, 1980 May 23, 1980 February 26, 1999 November 12, 2011
174 Ann Aldrich N.D. Ohio March 28, 1980 May 21, 1980 May 24, 1980 May 12, 1995 May 2, 2010
175 Elbert Bertram Haltom Jr. N.D. Ala. January 10, 1980 May 29, 1980 May 30, 1980 December 31, 1991 October 12, 2003
176 Robert Bruce Propst N.D. Ala. January 10, 1980 May 29, 1980 May 30, 1980 July 15, 1996 May 14, 2019
177 Robert Peter Aguilar N.D. Cal. April 3, 1980 June 18, 1980 June 18, 1980 April 15, 1996 June 24, 1996
178 Horace Weldon Gilmore E.D. Mich. May 22, 1980 June 18, 1980 June 18, 1980 May 1, 1991 January 25, 2010
179 Justin Lowe Quackenbush E.D. Wash. May 9, 1980 June 18, 1980 June 18, 1980 June 27, 1995 Incumbent
180 Clyde Frederick Shannon Jr. W.D. Tex. December 19, 1979 June 18, 1980 June 18, 1980 January 1, 1984
181 Green Wix Unthank E.D. Ky. December 19, 1979 June 18, 1980 June 18, 1980 June 14, 1988 June 25, 2013
182 Filemon Vela Sr. S.D. Tex. January 22, 1980 June 18, 1980 June 18, 1980 May 1, 2000 April 13, 2004
183 Earl H. Carroll D. Ariz. June 2, 1980 June 26, 1980 June 30, 1980 October 10, 1994 February 3, 2017
184 Carmen Consuelo Cerezo D.P.R. May 14, 1980 June 26, 1980 June 30, 1980 Incumbent
185 U. W. Clemon N.D. Ala. January 10, 1980 June 26, 1980 June 30, 1980 January 31, 2009
186 Thelton Henderson N.D. Cal. May 9, 1980 June 26, 1980 June 30, 1980 November 28, 1998 Incumbent
187 Judith Keep S.D. Cal. May 9, 1980 June 26, 1980 June 30, 1980 September 14, 2004
188 Alfredo Chavez Marquez D. Ariz. June 2, 1980 June 26, 1980 June 30, 1980 July 25, 1991 August 27, 2014
189 Marilyn Hall Patel N.D. Cal. May 9, 1980 June 26, 1980 June 30, 1980 October 30, 2009 September 30, 2012
190 A. Wallace Tashima C.D. Cal. May 9, 1980 June 26, 1980 June 30, 1980 January 8, 1996 Elevated
191 Earl Ben Gilliam S.D. Cal. December 7, 1979 August 19, 1980 August 20, 1980 April 2, 1993 January 28, 2001
192 Myron Herbert Thompson M.D. Ala. September 17, 1980 September 26, 1980 September 29, 1980 August 22, 2013 Incumbent
193 Richard Erwin M.D.N.C. June 11, 1980 September 29, 1980 September 30, 1980 September 22, 1992 November 7, 2006
194 Hipolito Frank Garcia W.D. Tex. December 19, 1979 September 29, 1980 September 30, 1980 January 16, 2002
195 Susan Getzendanner N.D. Ill. June 4, 1980 September 29, 1980 September 30, 1980 September 30, 1987
196 George Howard Jr. E.D. Ark.
W.D. Ark
June 2, 1980 September 29, 1980 September 30, 1980 April 21, 2007
December 1, 1990[8]
197 David Vreeland Kenyon C.D. Cal. June 20, 1980 September 29, 1980 September 30, 1980 October 27, 1995 July 31, 1997
198 Charles P. Kocoras N.D. Ill. June 2, 1980 September 29, 1980 September 30, 1980 June 30, 2006 Incumbent
199 Consuelo Bland Marshall C.D. Cal. June 20, 1980 September 29, 1980 September 30, 1980 October 24, 2005 Incumbent
200 James Harry Michael Jr. W.D. Va. April 9, 1980 September 29, 1980 September 30, 1980 October 31, 1995 August 29, 2005
201 Norman Park Ramsey D. Md. July 25, 1980 September 29, 1980 September 30, 1980 November 1, 1991 September 30, 1992
202 Richard Leroy Williams E.D. Va. April 9, 1979 September 29, 1980 September 30, 1980 May 1, 1992 February 19, 2011
203 Walter Meheula Heen D. Haw. January 8, 1981 January 1, 1981[9] December 16, 1981

Specialty courts (Article III)

United States Court of Customs and Patent Appeals

# Judge Nomination
date
Confirmation
date
Began active
service
Ended active
service
Ended senior
status
1 Helen W. Nies May 9, 1980 June 18, 1980 June 18, 1980 November 1, 1995[10] August 7, 1996

United States Court of Claims

# Judge Nomination
date
Confirmation
date
Began active
service
Ended active
service
Ended senior
status
1 Daniel Mortimer Friedman March 22, 1978 May 17, 1978 May 19, 1978 November 1, 1989[10] July 6, 2011
2 Edward Samuel Smith June 30, 1978 July 26, 1978 July 28, 1978 June 1, 1989[10] March 22, 2001

Notes

References

General
  • "Judges of the United States Courts". Biographical Directory of Federal Judges. Federal Judicial Center. Archived from the original on 2016-07-30. Retrieved 2009-04-03.
Specific
  1. ^ All information on the names, terms of service, and details of appointment of federal judges is derived from the Biographical Directory of Federal Judges, a public-domain publication of the Federal Judicial Center.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g Originally appointed to the Fifth Circuit, but reassigned by operation of law to the newly created Eleventh Circuit on October 1, 1981.
  3. ^ Reassigned to only the Eastern District of Arkansas on December 1, 1990.
  4. ^ Reassigned to only the Western District of Washington on November 8, 1978.
  5. ^ On March 31, 1979, the Eastern District and Southern District of Illinois were rearranged into the Southern District and a new United States District Court for the Central District of Illinois; Baker was reassigned by operation of law to the Central District, and was there for the remainder of his service.
  6. ^ Reassigned to only the Northern District of Iowa on December 1, 1990.
  7. ^ Reassigned from the Southern District of West Virginia to the Northern District of West Virginia on January 14, 1983.
  8. ^ Reassigned to only the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Arkansas on December 1, 1990.
  9. ^ Recess appointment; the United States Senate later rejected the appointment.
  10. ^ a b c Reassigned by operation of law to the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit on October 1, 1982.

Sources

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