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List of crossings of the Lower Passaic River

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The NX, Clay Street, and Stickel bridges are seen in this view looking downstream, or south, to Newark Gateway.
The NX, Clay Street, and Stickel bridges are seen in this view looking downstream, or south, to Newark Gateway.
Five bridges over the Passaic River at Newark.

The Lower Passaic River in New Jersey is the section of the Passaic River below the Great Falls which flows over the Dundee Dam to the river mouth at Newark Bay in the northeastern part of the state. Its midpoint generally delineates the Essex-Hudson and Passaic-Bergen county lines. Numerous spans, mostly moveable bridges, have been built over of the lower reaches of the river, which is tidally influenced to the dam at about mile point (MP) 17.4 and channelized to about MP 17. Once one of the most heavily used waterways in the Port of New York and New Jersey, it remains partially navigable for commercial marine traffic. While requests have significantly diminished since the mid-late 20th century, the bridge at MP 11.7 and those downstream from it are required by federal regulations to open with advance notice, with the exception of the first at MP 1.8, which is manned and opens on demand.

Early fixed crossings included turnpikes, sometimes built as plank roads. Wood, and later, metal bridges were constructed by competing railroads to access railyards, carfloat operations, passenger terminals, and ferries on the Hudson Waterfront. Rail lines led to further industrialization, urbanization-suburbanization, and the construction of vehicular bridges and streetcar lines. The advent of automobile age in the early and mid 20th century saw the building of highway bridges.

The Acquackanonk Bridge was dismantled in 1776 as George Washington retreated from Fort Lee. Another with the same name at the crossing was lost to flooding in 1903. The first railroad swing bridge in the United States was built in 1833. Numerous bridges have been demolished or fallen into disuse, while others have had their swing spans removed, replaced or immobilized. The first new bridge to be built since 2002, the Passaic River Crossing, opened in 2014.[1]

Crossings

MP Crossing Image Open Carries/Carried Locale/Connecting NBI Coordinate Notes Reference
1.2 PD Draw
(unused-swing span removed)
PD Draw Bridge 20070712.jpg
1869
1912
Newark and New York Railroad (CNJ) Kearny Point &
Newark Ironbound
40°43′22″N 74°07′14″W / 40.72279°N 74.12053°W / 40.72279; -74.12053 (PD Draw) Swing span shifted to new alignment [2][3][4]
Portway Bridge
(proposed)
Doremus Avenue to Central/Pennsylvania Aves Kearny Point &
Port Newark
alignment undetermined NJDOT to
Wittpenn Bridge replacement
[5][6]
1.8 Lincoln Highway Passaic River Bridge
9 truck Passaic br jeh.JPG
1941
US 1-9 Truck
milepoint 0.67
Lincoln Highway
Kearny Point &
Newark Ironbound
0705151 40°43′57″N 74°07′04″W / 40.7324°N 74.1179°W / 40.7324; -74.1179 (Lincoln Highway Passaic River Bridge) East Coast Greenway
Raymond Boulevard
NJRHP
[7][8][9][10][11]
Newark Plank Road
(removed)
1795 original
1941 last
Lincoln Highway
PS
40°43′58″N 74°07′04″W / 40.7327°N 74.1179°W / 40.7327; -74.1179 (Newark Plank Road) Ferry Street
Communipaw Ave
[10]
2.0 Pulaski Skyway
Pulaski Skyway full view.jpg
1932 US 1/9 0901150 (Hudson)[12]

0704150 (Essex)[13]

40°44′06″N 74°07′03″W / 40.73495°N 74.11743°W / 40.73495; -74.11743 (Pulaski Skyway) no trucks, bicycles, or peds
NJRHP & NRHP
[7][8]
2.6 Point-No-Point Bridge Point No Point Passaic River.tiff Conrail
Passaic and Harsimus Line (CSX) (NS)
Kearny Meadows &
Newark Ironbound
40°44′30″N 74°07′16″W / 40.7416°N 74.1211°W / 40.7416; -74.1211 (Point-No-Point Bridge) PRR [2][14]
2.7 Chaplain Washington Bridge
NewJerseyTurnpikePassaicRiver.jpg
1952 NJ Turnpike Eastern Spur
I-95
W107870 40°44′31″N 74°07′22″W / 40.74204°N 74.12264°W / 40.74204; -74.12264 (Chaplain Washington Bridge) no bicycles or pedestrians [7][8][15]
2.7 Harry Laderman Bridge
Interstate 95 Bridges 20070712.jpg
1970 NJ Turnpike Western Spur
I-95
E107880 40°44′31″N 74°07′23″W / 40.74196°N 74.12307°W / 40.74196; -74.12307 (Harry Laderman Bridge) no bicycles or pedestrians [7][8][15]
4.6 Jackson Street Bridge
Jackson Rogers Passaic br jeh.JPG
1903 Jackson Street
Frank E. Rodgers Blvd
Harrison &
Newark Ironbound
0700H02 40°44′02″N 74°09′19″W / 40.73383°N 74.15527°W / 40.73383; -74.15527 (Jackson Street Bridge) NJRHP [7][8][16]
Market Street Bridge (removed) 1868
1899
NJRR
PRR
Harrison &
Newark Penn
40°44′09″N 74°09′43″W / 40.7358°N 74.1619°W / 40.7358; -74.1619 (Market Street Bridge) Swing span shifted to new alignment [17]
5.0 Dock Bridge
(2 spans)
Dock Bridge - Newark, NJ.jpg
1935 (west)
1937 (east)
Northeast Corridor
Amtrak
Northeast Corridor Line (NJT)
North Jersey Coast Line (NJT)
Raritan Valley Line (NJT)
PATH
40°44′10″N 74°09′41″W / 40.7361°N 74.1615°W / 40.7361; -74.1615 (Dock Bridge) PRR & H&M
NJRPH & NRHP
[2][2]
Centre Street Bridge
(removed)
Centre Street Bridge, Newark, NJ.tif 1834
1911
New Jersey Railroad
PRR
H&M
Route 158
Harrison &
Downtown Newark
Park Place Station
40°44′28″N 74°09′51″W / 40.74099°N 74.16404°W / 40.74099; -74.16404 (Centre Street Bridge) Upper level added
Converted from rail to vehicular bridge 1927
5.6 Bridge Street Bridge
Newark Bridge Street Bridge.jpg
1913 Bridge Street & Harrison Avenue
CR 508
Harrison &
Downtown Newark
0700H03 40°44′43″N 74°09′57″W / 40.74515°N 74.16574°W / 40.74515; -74.16574 (Bridge Street Bridge) NJRHP [7][8][18]
5.85 Newark Drawbridge
Passaic River Morristown Line bridge jeh.jpg
1903 Montclair-Boonton Line (NJT)
Morristown Line (NJT)
Gladstone Branch (NJT)
Harrison & Newark Broad Street Station 40°44′51″N 74°09′57″W / 40.74743°N 74.16589°W / 40.74743; -74.16589 (Newark Drawbridge) Morris and Essex Railroad
(DL&W)
[2][7][19][7]
5.9 William A. Stickel Memorial Bridge
William Stickel Memorial Bridge from train on adjacent railroad bridge (2010).jpg
1949 I-280 Harrison &
Newark
0731161 40°44′53″N 74°09′57″W / 40.7480°N 74.1659°W / 40.7480; -74.1659 (William A. Stickel Memorial Bridge) [7][8][20]
6.0 Clay Street Bridge
Clay Street Bridge Newark jeh.jpg
1908
1976 rehab
Central Avenue
Clay Street
East Newark &
Newark Broadway
0700H01 40°45′04″N 74°09′55″W / 40.75103°N 74.16522°W / 40.75103; -74.16522 (Clay Street Bridge) [7][8][21]
6.35 NX Bridge (abandoned)
Erie-Lackawanna bascule E Newark jeh.jpg
1922 Newark Branch (Erie) Harrison/East Newark &
Newark
40°45′16″N 74°09′51″W / 40.7544°N 74.1643°W / 40.7544; -74.1643 (NX Bridge) Fixed open position [2][22]
8.1 WR Draw
(unused)
WR Draw Passaic River (North Newark-West Arlington).tiff 1897 New York & Greenwood Lake (Erie)
Boonton Line (NJT)
Arlington, Kearny &
North Newark
40°46′36″N 74°09′01″W / 40.7768°N 74.1502°W / 40.7768; -74.1502 (WR Draw) Kearny Riverbank Park [2][23]
Passaic Avenue Passaic Avenue
CR 699
CR 699 jct.svg
Arlington, Kearny 0900029 40°46′36″N 74°09′01″W / 40.7768°N 74.1502°W / 40.7768; -74.1502 (WR Draw) branch of Passaic [8][7]
8.9 Belleville Turnpike Bridge
Belleville Turnpike lift bridge SW cloudy jeh.jpg
1790
1841
1914
2002
Route 7 (Belleville Turnpike) Arlington, Kearny &
Belleville
0208150 40°47′11″N 74°08′51″W / 40.78647°N 74.14750°W / 40.78647; -74.14750 (Belleville Turnpike Bridge) [7][8][24]
10.7 Avondale Bridge KingslandAveBridgePassaicRiver1.tif 1905
1986 rehab
Park Avenue to Kingsland Avenue Nutley &
Lyndhurst
NJ 0700B01
NJ 020032A
40°48′40″N 74°08′19″W / 40.81103°N 74.13852°W / 40.81103; -74.13852 (Avondale Bridge) aka DeJessa Memorial Bridge or Park Avenue Bridge [7][8][25]
11.7 Lyndhurst Draw Lyndhurst Draw (Passaic River).tiff 1903 Main Line (NJT)
NS
Clifton Delawanna &
Lyndhurst
40°49′14″N 74°07′36″W / 40.82069°N 74.12668°W / 40.82069; -74.12668 (Lyndhurst Draw) DL&W & Erie
Boonton Branch
NJRHP
[2][7][26][7]
Route 3 Passaic River Crossing
Dual bridges
2014 Route 3
milepoint 4.95
Clifton &
Rutherford/Lyndhurst
1601155
1601164
40°49′23″N 74°07′26″W / 40.82296°N 74.12394°W / 40.82296; -74.12394 (Route 3 Passaic River Crossing) NJDOT [7][7][8][8][27]
11.8 Old Route 3 Passaic River Bridge
(demolished)
Old Route 3 Bridge 200707.jpg
1949
demolished 2013
Clifton &
Rutherford
40°49′23″N 74°07′26″W / 40.82296°N 74.12394°W / 40.82296; -74.12394 (Old Route 3 Passaic River Bridge) [28]
13.2 Union Avenue Bridge
1896 Bridge
2002 Bridge
2002 Bridge
1896
2002 replace
Union Avenue Route 21
Passaic &
Rutherford
1600022 40°50′29″N 74°07′22″W / 40.84150°N 74.12283°W / 40.84150; -74.12283 (Union Avenue Bridge) aka Douglas O. Mead Bridge
Swing removed and reconstructed (2002)
[7][8][29]
BE Draw
(removed)
1833
1897
Paterson and Hudson River Railroad (Erie)
MP 10.22
Passaic-Passaic Park &
Rutherford/Wallington
Carlton Hill
40°50′49″N 74°07′16″W / 40.8470°N 74.1212°W / 40.8470; -74.1212 (BE Draw) Erie Main Line until 1963 [2][30][31][32][32][33]
14.0 Gregory Avenue Bridge GregoryAveBridge(PassaicRiver).tiff 1906 Gregory Avenue to Paterson Avenue Passaic &
Wallington
1600002 40°51′15″N 74°07′11″W / 40.8543°N 74.1196°W / 40.8543; -74.1196 (Gregory Avenue Bridge) aka Slomiany Memorial Bridge
Fixed closed position (1986)
NJRHP
[7][8][34]
Acquackanonk Bridge
(removed)
1741
1776
1835
1863
1890
1905
Paterson Plank Road
Paterson, Passaic and Rutherford Electric Railway
40°51′18″N 74°07′12″W / 40.8550°N 74.1199°W / 40.8550; -74.1199 (Acquackanonk Bridge) burned 1776
destroyed in flood 1903
[35][36][37][38]
14.7 Market Street Bridge
aka Second Street Bridge
Market Street Bridge 20100829.jpg
1930
2002
Market Street Bridge 1600003 40°51′36″N 74°06′58″W / 40.860°N 74.116°W / 40.860; -74.116 (Second Street Bridge) Fixed closed position (1977)
swing removed & reconstructed (2002)
[7][8]
15.3 Eighth Street Bridge
Eighth Street Bridge 20070717.jpg
1915 Eighth Street
Main Avenue
1600004 40°51′19″N 74°06′34″W / 40.85531°N 74.10953°W / 40.85531; -74.10953 (Eighth Street Bridge) Fixed closed position (1976)
NJRHP
[7][8][39]
Passaic Street Bridge
Passaic Ave Bridge 20100829.jpg
1898
1976 rehab
Wall Street
Passaic Street
Passaic &
Garfield
020021C 40°51′53″N 74°06′36″W / 40.86472°N 74.11003°W / 40.86472; -74.11003 (Passaic Street Bridge) NJRHP [7][8][40]
Bergen County Short-Cut
Monroe Railroad Bridge 20100829.jpg
1881 original Dundee Spur (Erie)
New York and Greenwood Lake Railway (1996)
40°52′07″N 74°06′44″W / 40.86862°N 74.11234°W / 40.86862; -74.11234 (Bergen County Short-Cut) connections to NS/Bergen County Line (NJT) [2][41]
Monroe Street Bridge
Monroe Street Bridge 20100829.jpg
1908 Monroe Street 02000I6
020021D
40°52′08″N 74°06′45″W / 40.86883°N 74.11249°W / 40.86883; -74.11249 (Monroe Street Bridge) 1875-1878 bridge lost to flooding [7][8][42][43]
Passaic Branch[44]
(removed)
1885 Passaic and New York Railroad (NYS&W) 40°52′23″N 74°06′54″W / 40.8731°N 74.1150°W / 40.8731; -74.1150 (Passaic Branch rail bridge) Passaic Junction (rail yard)
Botany Mills
Veterans Bridge
Outwater Lane Bridge 20070803-jag9889.jpg

Dundee Canal 1997.jpg

Ackerman Avenue
Outwater Lane
Clifton &
Garfield
020021E 40°52′47″N 74°07′12″W / 40.8798°N 74.1201°W / 40.8798; -74.1201 (Veterans Bridge) aka Robertsford Bridge
Dundee Canal Industrial Historic District
[7][8]
17.4 Dundee Dam Lock (water navigation) DundeeDamPassaicRiver1.tif 1861 n/a 40°53′01″N 74°07′36″W / 40.8835°N 74.1266°W / 40.8835; -74.1266 (Dundee Dam)
17.4 Dundee Canal Lock 1861 n/a 40°53′01″N 74°07′36″W / 40.8835°N 74.1266°W / 40.8835; -74.1266 (Dundee Dam) lock head gate [45]
Map all coordinates using: OpenStreetMap 
Download coordinates as: KML · GPX

Abbreviations

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Grant, Meghan. "Expanded Route 3 bridge reopened". Retrieved December 8, 2016.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "New Jersey Coverage Map". Bridgehunter. Retrieved December 10, 2016.
  3. ^ "CNJ - PD Draw". Retrieved December 8, 2016.
  4. ^ "An Unusual Bridge-Moving Operation", Popular Mechanics Magazine, p. 26, July 1912, retrieved August 8, 2012
  5. ^ "Portway-Passaic River Crossing" (PDF). FY 2010-2011 Studies and Development. NJDOT. Retrieved August 8, 2012. This project will study Doremus Avenue, Passaic River Crossing and Central Avenue over Route 1&9T as one project because of their connectivity. The areas of the project service industrial and commercial facilities in a section of Newark and the southern section of Kearny. The purpose of the proposed improvement is to create a connection with NJ Turnpike at Interchange 15E and Route 1&9T, and/or another variation of the two. The improved section will serve to improve access to/from trucking distribution facilities along Doremus Avenue and the NJ Turnpike and will help reduce truck traffic on Route 1&9T. It will range from replacing the existing Route 1&9T bridge to providing dual bridge structures. The reconfiguration of Central Avenue/Route 1&9T interchange may provide four 12-foot travel lanes and two 12-foot shoulders to improve flow and safety. The proposed geometry will primarily follow the existing alignment except at the interchange. Sidewalks could be provided within the proposed berm. A rail crossing on the same facility will also be investigated as part of this project.
  6. ^ "Lower Passaic River Restoration Project Commercial Navigation Analysis 2nd revision" (PDF). United States Army Corps of Engineers. July 2, 2010. Retrieved August 5, 2012. The abutments of a formerly utilized railroad freight bridge (Central Railroad of NJ) lie at approximately RM 1.2. These abutments limit channel width to 145 feet. However, NJDOT is currently investigating the feasibility of a new Lower Passaic River Bridge within the existing alignment of the former railroad freight bridge. If construction of the new bridge was to move forward, the derelict structure at RM 1.2 would be removed and would be replaced with a structure designed with adequate horizontal and vertical clearance for typical vessel traffic on the Lower Passaic River
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x "Interim Bridge Report" (PDF). NJDOT. August 9, 2007. Retrieved December 1, 2016.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t "National Bridge Inventory NJ2015". Federal Highway Administration. 2015. Retrieved January 10, 2017.
  9. ^ "Passaic River Bridge". Retrieved December 8, 2016.
  10. ^ a b "To Close Road, Open New Span". The New York Times. January 23, 1941. Retrieved December 8, 2016.
  11. ^ "U.S. Route 1-9 Truck straight line diagram" (PDF). NJDOT. Retrieved December 21, 2016.
  12. ^ Federal Highway Administration (2012). "NBI Structure Number: 0901150". National Bridge Inventory. Federal Highway Administration.
  13. ^ Federal Highway Administration (2012). "NBI Structure Number: 0704150". National Bridge Inventory. Federal Highway Administration.
  14. ^ "CRCX - Point No Point Bridge". Retrieved December 8, 2016.
  15. ^ a b Staff. "Route 700 Straight Line Diagram" (PDF). NJDOT. Retrieved March 25, 2016.
  16. ^ "Jackson Street Bridge". Retrieved December 8, 2016.
  17. ^ "Civil Engineering Feat Old Bridge Removed and New One Substituted in 18 1/2 Minutes Crosses the Passaic" (PDF), The New York Times, July 24, 1899, retrieved August 25, 2012
  18. ^ "Bridge Street Bridge". Retrieved December 8, 2016.
  19. ^ "NJT - Newark Draw". Retrieved December 8, 2016.
  20. ^ "Stickel Bridge -". Retrieved December 8, 2016.
  21. ^ "Clay Street Bridge". Retrieved December 8, 2016.
  22. ^ "Erie - NX Bridge". Retrieved December 8, 2016.
  23. ^ "NJT - WR Draw". Retrieved December 8, 2016.
  24. ^ "Belleville Turnpike Bridge". Retrieved December 8, 2016.
  25. ^ "Avondale Bridge". Retrieved December 8, 2016.
  26. ^ "NJT - Lyndhurst Draw". Retrieved December 8, 2016.
  27. ^ "Route 3 straight line diagram" (PDF). NJDOT. Retrieved December 21, 2016.
  28. ^ "Masonry and Metal: The Historic Bridges of Bergen County, New Jersey" (PDF). Richard Grubb and Associates. 2008. Archived from the original (PDF) on July 10, 2012. Retrieved May 18, 2017.
  29. ^ "Passaic River Bridge". Retrieved December 8, 2016.
  30. ^ "EL - Passaic River Bridge". Retrieved December 8, 2016.
  31. ^ Bianculli, Anthony J. (2001). Trains and Technology: The American Railroad in the Nineteenth Century. 4. University of Delaware Press. ISBN 9780874138030. The first railroad drawbridge in the United States was built by the Paterson and Hudson River Railroad across the Passaic River in New Jersey in 1832
  32. ^ a b https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1934/11/18/95497819.pdf
  33. ^ Brydon, Norman F. (December 2006). "Passaic County's Covered Bridges (Extracted frcm Of Time, Ftre and the River:The Story of New Jersey's Covered Bridges)" (PDF). Vol. 6. The Fassaie County Historical Society by Norman F. Brydon). Archived from the original (PDF) on June 24, 2016. Retrieved February 9, 2017. Cite magazine requires |magazine= (help)
  34. ^ "Gregory Avenue Bridge". Retrieved December 8, 2016.
  35. ^ "Masonry and Metal The Historic Bridges of Bergen County, New Jersey" (PDF). Richard Grubb and Associates. 2008. Archived from the original (PDF) on July 10, 2012. Retrieved August 21, 2012.
  36. ^ Scott, William W. How Washington's Retreat Became Stabilized at Passaic Passaic County Historical Publication September 1, 1931 Archived December 19, 2015, at the Wayback Machine
  37. ^ "Passaic, New Jersey Revolutionary War Sites - Passaic Historic Sites". revolutionarywarnewjersey.com. Retrieved September 28, 2015.
  38. ^ "Full text of "Washington and his army at Acquackanonk : an incident of the retreat of 'seventy-six"". archive.org. Retrieved September 28, 2015.
  39. ^ http://bridgehunter.com/nj/passaic/1600004/
  40. ^ https://bridgehunter.com/nj/bergen/passaic-river/
  41. ^ https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1885/07/10/103630028.pdf
  42. ^ "Monroe Street Bridge". Retrieved December 8, 2016.
  43. ^ http://www.bridgesnyc.com/tag/monroe-street/
  44. ^ "THE BRIDGE TORN DOWN; THE ERIE'S PROPERTY DESTROYED BY ITS RIVAL'S WORKMEN. FIVE HUNDRED HUNGARIANS PLUNGE INTO THE CANAL AFTER THE FLOATING TIMBER--A COMPROMISE.", The New York Times, July 11, 1885
  45. ^ http://www.lambertcastle.org/dundeebridge.html

Sources

External links

Ensslin, John C. (September 30, 2012), Many Bergen County bridges nearing end of lifespan, retrieved October 3, 2012

This page was last edited on 21 September 2019, at 07:23
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