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List of characters and names mentioned in the Quran

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

List of characters and names, mentioned in the Quran. Standard form: Islamic name / Biblical name (title or relationship). This list makes use of ISO 233 for the Romanization of Arabic words.[1]

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Transcription

Contents

Supernatural

Deity

Angels

Jinn

Beings in Paradise

  • Wildān[16][17] - perpetually youthful attendants (male and female)
  • Ḥūr[a][21] - pure companions (male and female) with beautiful eyes

Animals

Related

Non-related

Prophets

Anbiyāʾ (Arabic: أَنۢبِيَاء‎, Prophets)[c] were of two types:

Mentioned

Ulu-l-ʿAzm

Those of the Perseverance and Strong Will (Arabic: أُولُو ٱلْعَزْم‎, romanizedUlu-l-ʿAzm)[h] in reverse chronological order:

Debatable ones

Implicitly mentioned

Contemporaries, relatives or followers of Prophets

Aʿdāʾ (Arabic: أَعْدَاء‎, Enemies or foes), aṣḥāb (Arabic: أَصْحَاب‎, companions or friends), qurbā (Arabic: قُرْبَى‎, kin), or followers[j] of Prophets:

Good ones

Evil ones

Implicitly or non-specifically mentioned

Groups

Mentioned

Tribes, ethnicities or families

Implicitly mentioned

Religious groups

Locations

Mentioned

Religious locations

Implicitly mentioned

Plant matter

  • Baṣal (Arabic: بَصَل‎, Onion) (2:61)[3]
  • Fūm (Arabic: فُوْم‎, Garlic]] or wheat) (2:61)[3]
  • Shaṭʾ (Arabic: شَطْئ‎, Shoot) (48:29)[50]
  • Sūq (Arabic: سُوْق‎, Plant stem) (48:29)[50]
  • Zarʿ (Arabic: زَرْع‎, Seed)[t]

Fruits

Fawākih (Arabic: فَوَاكِه‎)[u] or Thamarāt (Arabic: ثَمَرَات‎):[98][v]

Plants

Shajar (Arabic: شَجَر‎,[20] Bushes, trees or plants):[x]

Holy books

Objects of people or beings

Mentioned idols (cult images)

Celestial bodies

Maṣābīḥ (Arabic: مَصَابِيْح‎,[102][103] literally 'lamps'):

Liquids

Events, incidents, occasions or times

Battles or military expeditions

Days

  • Al-Jumuʿah[108] (The Friday)
  • As-Sabt[3][73] (The Sabbath or Saturday)
  • Days of battles or military expeditions (see the above section)
  • Days of Hajj
    • Ayyāminm-Maʿdūdatin (Arabic: أَيَّامٍ مَّعْدُوْدَاتٍ‎, lit. 'Appointed Days') (2:203)[3]
    • Yawm al-Ḥajj al-Akbar (Arabic: يَوْم ٱلْحَجّ ٱلْأَكْبَر‎, lit. 'Day of the Greatest Pilgrimage') (9:2)[68]
  • Doomsday

Months of the Islamic calendar

  • Four holy months (2:189–217; 9:1–36)
    • Al-Ash-hur Al-Ḥurum (Arabic: ٱلْأَشْهُر ٱلْحُرُم‎, The Sacred or Forbidden Months) (9:5)[68]
      • Ash-Shahr Al-Ḥarām (Arabic: ٱلشَّهْر ٱلْحَرَام‎, The Sacred or Forbidden Month) (2:194–217;[3] 5:97)[81]
    • Arbaʿah ḥurum (Arabic: أَرْبَعَة حُرُم‎, Four (months which are) Sacred) (9:36)[68]
    • Ash-hur maʿlūmāt (Arabic: أَشْهُر مَعْلُوْمَات‎, Months (which are) well-known (for the Hajj)) (2:197)[3]
  • Ramaḍān (Arabic: رَمَضَان‎) (2:183–187)[3]

Pilgrimages

  • Al-Ḥajj (The Greater Pilgrimage)
    • Ḥajj al-Bayt (Arabic: حَجّ ٱلْبَيْت‎, "Pilgrimage of the House") (2:158)[3]
    • Ḥijj al-Bayt (Arabic: حِجّ ٱلْبَيْت‎, "Pilgrimage of the House") (3:97)[42]
  • Al-ʿUmrah (The Lesser Pilgrimage) (2:158–196)[3]

Times for Prayer or Remembrance

Times for Duʿāʾ ('Invocation'), Ṣalāh and Dhikr ('Remembrance', including Taḥmīd ('Praising'),[109][110] Takbīr and Tasbīḥ):

  • Al-ʿAshiyy (Arabic: ٱلْعَشِيّ‎, The Afternoon or the Night) (30:17–18)[111]
  • Al-Ghuduww (Arabic: ٱلْغُدُوّ‎, lit. 'The Mornings') (7:205–206)[26]
    • Al-Bukrah (Arabic: ٱلْبُكْرَة‎, lit. 'The Morning') (48:9)[50]
    • Aṣ-Ṣabāḥ (Arabic: ٱلصَّبَاح‎, lit. 'The Morning') (30:17–18)[111]
  • Al-Layl (Arabic: ٱللَّيْل‎, lit. 'The Night') (17:78–81;[44] 50:39–40)[14]
  • Aẓ-Ẓuhr (Arabic: ٱلظُّهْر‎, lit. 'The Noon') (30:17–18)[111]
    • Aẓ-Ẓahīrah (Arabic: ٱلظَّهِيْرَة‎) (24:58)[112]
  • Dulūk ash-Shams (Arabic: دُلُوْك ٱلشَّمْس‎, lit. 'Decline of the Sun') (17:78–81)[44]
  • Qabl ṭulūʿ ash-Shams (Arabic: قَبْل طُلُوْع ٱلشَّمْس‎, lit. 'Before the rising of the Sun') (50:39–40)[14]

Implied

Others

  • Bayt (Arabic: بًيْت‎, Home or House)
    • Al-Bayt al-Maʿmūr (Arabic: ٱلْبَيْت ٱلْمَعْمُوْر‎)
  • Ḥunafāʾ (Arabic: حُنَفَاء‎)
  • Ṭāhā (Arabic: طـٰهٰ‎)
  • Ṭayyibah (Arabic: طَيِّبَة‎)
  • Zīnah (Arabic: زِيْنَة‎), Adornment, beauty, beautiful thing or splendour)

See also

Notelist

  1. ^ 44:54;[18] 52:20;[19] 55:72;[20] 56:22.[16]
  2. ^ Plural: ḥumur (Arabic: حُمُر‎).[25]
  3. ^ Pronounced "Ambiyāʾ," due to Nūn (ن) preceding Ba (ب). It is also written as Nabiyyīn (نَبِيِّيْن)[33] and Nabiyyūn (نَبِيُّوْن).
    • Singular: Nabiyy نَبِيّ
  4. ^ Also Mursalīn (مُرْسَلِيْن) or Mursalūn (مُرْسَلُوْن).
    • Singular: Mursal (مُرْسَل) or Rasūl (رَسُوْل).[34]
  5. ^ 4:163;[31] 6:84;[37] 21:83;[38] 38:41.[36]
  6. ^ 7:73 – 79;[26] 11:61 – 68;[27] 26:141 – 158;[5] 54:23 – 31;[28] 89:6 – 13;[29] 91:11 – 15.[30]
  7. ^ 4:163;[31] 6:86;[37] 10:98;[43] 37:139.
  8. ^ 2:253;[3] 17:55;[44] 33:7;[33] 42:13;[45] 46:35.[46]
  9. ^ 3:144;[42] 33:09;[33] 47:02;[47] 48:22.[48]
  10. ^ Tabiʿīn (Arabic: تَابِعِيْن‎) or Tabiʿūn (Arabic: تَابِعُوْن‎).
  11. ^ Treating all humans as his relatives.
  12. ^ 9:114;[68] 43:26;[7] 19:41 – 42.[39]
  13. ^ 28:6 – 38;[58] 29:39; 40:24 – 36.
  14. ^ 28:76 – 79;[58] 29:39; 40:24.
  15. ^ Forms:
    • Masculine: Muslimīn (Arabic: مُسْلِمِيْن‎) or Muslimūn (Arabic: مُسْلِمُوْن‎),
    • Feminine: Muslimāt (Arabic: مُسْلِمَات‎),
    • Singular: masculine: Muslim (Arabic: مُسْلِم‎), feminine: Muslimah (Arabic: مُسْلِمَة‎).
  16. ^ Forms:
    • Masculine: Muʾminīn (Arabic: مُؤْمِنِيْن‎) or Muʾminūn (Arabic: مُؤْمِنُوْن‎),
    • Feminine: Muʾmināt (Arabic: مُؤْمِنَات‎),
    • Singular: masculine: Mu’min (Arabic: مُؤْمِن‎), feminine: Muʾminah (Arabic: مُؤْمِنَة‎).
  17. ^ Forms:
    • Masculine: Ṣāliḥīn (Arabic: صَالِحِيْن‎) or Ṣāliḥūn (Arabic: صَالِحُوْن‎),
    • Feminine: Ṣāliḥāt (Arabic: صَالِحَات‎),
    • Singular: masculine: Ṣāliḥ (Arabic: صَالِح‎), feminine: Ṣāliḥah (Arabic: صَالِحَة‎).
  18. ^ Forms:
    • Masculine: Mushrikīn (Arabic: مُشْرِكِيْن‎) or Mushrikūn (Arabic: مُشْرِكُوْن‎), literally "Those who associate",
    • Feminine: Mushrikāt (Arabic: مُشْرِكَات‎), literally "Females who associate",
    • Singular: masculine: Mushrik (Arabic: مُشْرِك‎), literally "He who associates," feminine: Mushrikah (Arabic: مُشْرِكَة‎), literally "She who associates".
  19. ^ 2:61;[3] 10:87;[43] 12:21 – 99;[22] 43:51.[7]
  20. ^ Plural: Zurrā‘ (Arabic: زَرَّاع‎ (48:29))[50]
  21. ^ Singular: fākihah (Arabic: فَاكِهَة‎).[19][20]
  22. ^ Singular: thamarah (Arabic: ثَمَرَة‎).
  23. ^ Plural Aʿnāb (Arabic: أَعْنَاب‎): 2:266.[3]
  24. ^ Singular: shajarah (Arabic: شَجَرَة‎).[3]
  25. ^ Singular: Kawkab (Arabic: كَـوْكَـب‎.[22]
  26. ^ Singular: Najm (Arabic: الـنَّـجْـم‎).[100]
  27. ^ 2:249;[3] 18:33;[15] 54:54.[28]
  28. ^ Al-Āṣāl (Arabic: ٱلْأٓصَال‎, lit. 'the Afternoons') (7:205–206).[26]

References

Individual

  1. ^ "Transliteration of Arabic" (PDF), EKI, 2008-02-25, retrieved 2018-05-27
  2. ^ Quran 1:1–4
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar Quran 2:7–286
  4. ^ Quran 66:4 (Translated by Yusuf Ali)
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i Quran 26:141–195
  6. ^ a b Quran 16:68–69
  7. ^ a b c d e Quran 43:1–77
  8. ^ Quran 96:9–19
  9. ^ a b Quran 39:65–75
  10. ^ a b Webster, Richard (2009). Encyclopedia of angels (1st ed.). Woodbury, he will blow the trumpet when the day comes to the end Minn.: Llewellyn Publications. p. 97. ISBN 9780738714622.
  11. ^ a b "Israfil". Encyclopaedia. Britannica. Retrieved 2012-11-20.
  12. ^ Quran 82:10–12
  13. ^ a b c d e Quran 27:6–93
  14. ^ a b c d e f Quran 50:12–40
  15. ^ a b c d e f Quran 18:33–94
  16. ^ a b Quran 56:17–22
  17. ^ a b Quran 76:19–31
  18. ^ a b c Quran 44:1–54
  19. ^ a b c Quran 52:1–24
  20. ^ a b c d e f g Quran 55:5–72
  21. ^ Asad, M. (2003). "(Surah) 56 Al-Waqiah, Ayah 38". The Message of The Qur'an. Note 15.
  22. ^ a b c d e f g h Quran 12:4–102
  23. ^ al-Tabari, Muhammad ibn Jarir (Translated by William Brinner) (1987). The History of al-Tabari Vol. 2: Prophets and Patriarchs. SUNY. p. 150.
  24. ^ a b Quran 105:1–5
  25. ^ a b c Quran 74:41–51
  26. ^ a b c d e f g h i Quran 7:2–206
  27. ^ a b c d e f Quran 11:61–68
  28. ^ a b c d e f g h i Quran 54:1–54
  29. ^ a b c d e Quran 89:6–13
  30. ^ a b c d e Quran 91:11–15
  31. ^ a b c Quran 4:163 (Translated by Yusuf Ali)
  32. ^ a b Quran 29:41–67
  33. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Quran 33:09–73
  34. ^ a b c Quran 61:6 (Translated by Yusuf Ali)
  35. ^ a b c d Quran 22:25–52
  36. ^ a b c d Quran 38:13–48
  37. ^ a b c d Quran 6:74–92
  38. ^ a b c d e f Quran 21:51–83
  39. ^ a b Quran 19:41–56
  40. ^ Quran 6:85 (Translated by Yusuf Ali)
  41. ^ Quran 37:123 (Translated by Yusuf Ali)
  42. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p Quran 3:2–200
  43. ^ a b c d e f g Quran 10:3–101
  44. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Quran 17:1–110
  45. ^ a b Quran 42:5–13
  46. ^ a b Quran 46:21–35
  47. ^ Quran 47:02 (Translated by Yusuf Ali)
  48. ^ a b Quran 48:22–29
  49. ^ Guthrie, A.; Bishop, E. F. F. (October 1951), The Paraclete, Almunhamanna and Ahmad, XLI, Muslim World, pp. 254–255
  50. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Quran 48:1–29
  51. ^ a b Parrinder, Geoffrey (1965). Jesus in the Quran. London: Oxford Oneworld Publications. ISBN 978-1-8516-8999-6.
  52. ^ Schumann, Olaf H. (2002). Jesus the Messiah in Muslim Thought. Delhi: ISPCK/HIM. p. 13. ISBN 978-8172145224.
  53. ^ Little, John T. (3 April 2007). "AL-INSĀN AL-KĀMIL: THE PERFECT MAN ACCORDING TO IBN AL-'ARAB?". The Muslim World. 77 (1): 43–54. doi:10.1111/j.1478-1913.1987.tb02785.x. Ibn al-'Arabi uses no less than twenty-two different terms to describe the various aspects under which this single Logos may be viewed.
  54. ^ a b McDowell, Jim, Josh; Walker, Jim (2002). Understanding Islam and Christianity: Beliefs That Separate Us and How to Talk About Them. Eugene, Oregon: Harvest House Publishers. ISBN 9780736949910.
  55. ^ a b c d Quran 20:9–99
  56. ^ a b Quran 36:1–81
  57. ^ Williams, J. (1993–2011). "The Book Of Jubilees". Wesley Center Online. Retrieved 2018-02-18.
  58. ^ a b c d e f g Quran 28:3–86
  59. ^ Vajda, G.; Wensick, A. J. Binyamin. I. Encyclopaedia of Islam.
  60. ^ Testament of Simeon 4
  61. ^ Book of Genesis, 39:1
  62. ^ al-Tabari, Muhammad ibn Jarir (Translated by William Brinner) (1987). The History of al-Tabari Vol. 2: Prophets and Patriarchs. SUNY. p. 153.
  63. ^ "Quran Tafsir Ibn Kathir". Qtafsir.com. Retrieved 2018-02-17.
  64. ^ Imani, A. A. A-H. S. K. F.; Sadr-Ameli, S. A. (2014-10-07). An Enlightening Commentary Into the Light of the Holy Qur'an: From Surah Yunus (10) to Surah Yusuf (12). 7. Lulu Press Inc. p. 35. ISBN 9781312523258.
  65. ^ Bruijn (2013). "Yūsuf and Zulayk̲h̲ā". Encyclopedia of Islam; Second Edition: 1.
  66. ^ Stories of the Prophets, Ibn Kathir, Abraham and his father
  67. ^ Book of Joshua, Chapter 24, Verse 2
  68. ^ a b c d e f g h i Quran 9:1–129
  69. ^ a b Quran 79:15–26
  70. ^ a b Quran 111:1–5
  71. ^ Ibn Hisham note 97. Translated by Guillaume, A. (1955). The Life of Muhammad p. 707. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  72. ^ Ayoub, Mahmoud M. (2013-05-21). The Qur'an and Its Interpreters: Volume 2: Surah 3. Islamic Book Trust. p. 93. ISBN 978-967-5062-91-9.
  73. ^ a b Quran 4:47 (Translated by Yusuf Ali)
  74. ^ a b Quran 63:1–11
  75. ^ Brannon M. Wheeler (2002). Prophets in the Quran: An Introduction to the Quran and Muslim Exegesis. Continuum International Publishing Group. p. 166. ISBN 978-0-8264-4956-6.
  76. ^ a b c d e f Quran 34:10–18
  77. ^ a b Quran 106:1–4
  78. ^ a b c Quran 15:78–84
  79. ^ a b Quran 11:69–83
  80. ^ Jacobsen, Thorkild. "Mesopotamian religion". Encyclopædia Britannica.
  81. ^ a b c d e Quran 5:1–120
  82. ^ a b c d Quran 95:1–8
  83. ^ Quran 6:92 (Translated by Yusuf Ali)
  84. ^ "Saba / Sa'abia / Sheba". The History Files (http://www.historyfiles.co.uk). Retrieved 2008-06-27. The kingdom of Saba is known to have existed in the region of Yemen. By 1000 BC caravan trains of camels journeyed from Oman in south-east Arabia to the Mediterranean. As the camel drivers passed through the deserts of Yemen, experts believe that many of them would have called in at Ma'rib. Dating from at least 1050 BC, and now barren and dry, Ma'rib was then a lush oasis teeming with palm trees and exotic plants. Ideally placed, it was situated on the trade routes and with a unique dam of vast proportions. It was also one of only two main sources of frankincense (the other being East Africa), so Saba had a virtual monopoly. Ma'rib's wealth accumulated to such an extent that the city became a byword for riches beyond belief throughout the Arab world. Its people, the Sabeans - a group whose name bears the same etymological root as Saba - lived in South Arabia between the tenth and sixth centuries BC. Their main temple - Mahram Bilqis, or temple of the moon god (situated about three miles (5 km) from the capital city of Ma'rib) - was so famous that it remained sacred even after the collapse of the Sabean civilisation in the sixth century BC - caused by the rerouting of the spice trail. By that point the dam, now in a poor state of repair, was finally breached. The irrigation system was lost, the people abandoned the site within a year or so, and the temple fell into disrepair and was eventually covered by sand. Saba was known by the Hebrews as Sheba [Note that the collapse of the dam was actually in 575 CE, as shown in the timeline in the same article in the History Files, and attested by MacCulloch (2009)].
  85. ^ Robert D. Burrowes (2010). Historical Dictionary of Yemen. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 234–319. ISBN 978-0810855281.
  86. ^ a b Quran 11:44 (Translated by Yusuf Ali)
  87. ^ Quran 23:23–30
  88. ^ a b Summarized from the book of story of Muhammad by Ibn Hisham Volume 1 pg.419–421
  89. ^ a b "Three Day Fast of Nineveh". Syrian orthodox Church. Archived from the original on 2012-10-25. Retrieved 1 February 2012.
  90. ^ Quran 76:19–31
  91. ^ Ibn Kathir (2013-01-01). Dr Mohammad Hilmi Al-Ahmad (ed.). Stories of the Prophets: [قصص الأنبياء [انكليزي. Dar Al Kotob Al Ilmiyah (Arabic: دار الـكـتـب الـعـلـمـيـة‎). ISBN 978-2745151360.
  92. ^ Elhadary, Osman (2016-02-08). "11, 15". Moses in the Holy Scriptures of Judaism, Christianity and Islam: A Call for Peace. BookBaby. ISBN 978-1483563039.
  93. ^ Long, David E. (1979). "2: The Rites of the Hajj". The Hajj Today: A Survey of the Contemporary Pilgrimage to Makkah. pp. 11–24. ISBN 978-0873953825. With thousands of Hajjis, most of them in motor vehicles, rushing headlong for Muzdalifah, the potential is there for one of ... There is special grace for praying at the roofless mosque in Muzdalifah called al-Mash'ar al-Haram (the Sacred Grove) ...
  94. ^ Danarto (1989). A Javanese pilgrim in Mecca. p. 27. ISBN 978-0867469394. It was still dark when we arrived at Muzdalifah, four miles away. The Koran instructs us to spend the night at al-Mash'ar al-Haram. the Sacred Grove at Muzdalifah, as one of the conditions for the hajj . We scrambled out of the bus and looked ...
  95. ^ Jones, Lindsay (2005). Encyclopedia of religion. 10. Macmillan Reference USA. p. 7159. ISBN 978-0028657431. The Qur'an admonishes: "When you hurry from Arafat, remember God at the Sacred Grove (al-mash' ar al-haram)," that is, at Muzdalifah (2:198). Today a mosque marks the place in Muzdalifah where pilgrims gather to perform the special saldt ...
  96. ^ Ziauddin Sardar; M. A. Zaki Badawi (1978). Hajj Studies. King Abdul Aziz University. Jeddah: Croom Helm for Hajj Research Centre. p. 32. ISBN 978-0856646812. Muzdalifah is an open plain sheltered by parched hills with sparse growth of thorn bushes. The pilgrims spend a night under the open sky of the roofless Mosque, the Sacred Grove, Al Mush'ar al-Haram. On the morning of the tenth, all depart ...
  97. ^ "Mecca: Islam's cosmopolitan heart". The Hijaz is the largest, most populated, and most culturally and religiously diverse region of Saudi Arabia, in large part because it was the traditional host area of all the pilgrims to Mecca, many of whom settled and intermarried there.
  98. ^ a b Quran 13:3–39
  99. ^ Quran 59:3
  100. ^ a b c Quran 53:1–20
  101. ^ Quran 4:51–57
  102. ^ Quran 41:12 (Translated by Yusuf Ali)
  103. ^ Quran 67:5 (Translated by Yusuf Ali)
  104. ^ Quran 37:6 (Translated by Yusuf Ali)
  105. ^ Quran 82:2 (Translated by Yusuf Ali)
  106. ^ Quran 53:49
  107. ^ Quran 97:1–5
  108. ^ Quran 62:1–11
  109. ^ "Meaning, Origin and History of the Name Tahmid". Behind the Name. Retrieved 2015-07-10.
  110. ^ Wehr, H.; Cowan, J. M. (1979). A Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic (PDF) (4th ed.). Spoken Language Services.
  111. ^ a b c d Quran 30:1–18
  112. ^ a b c Quran 24:58 (Translated by Yusuf Ali)
  113. ^ Quran 103:1–3
  114. ^ Tafsir ibn Abi Hatim Vol. 4 Pg. 1172 Hadith no. 6609
  115. ^ Al-Shahrastani (1984). Kitab al–Milal wa al-Nihal. London: Kegan Paul. pp. 139–140.
  116. ^ Tabataba'i, Al-Mizan, 2, p. 135
  117. ^ Nishapuri, Al-Hakim, Al-Mustadrak, 3, p. 5
  118. ^ Shaybani, Fada'il al-sahaba, 2, p. 484
  119. ^ 'Ayyashi, Tafsir, 1, p. 101
  120. ^ Zarkashī, Al-Burhān fī 'ulūm al-Qur'ān, 1, p. 206
  121. ^ Mubarakpuri, S. R., "The Compensatory 'Umrah (Lesser Pilgrimage)", Ar-Raḥīq Al-Makhtūm ("The Sealed Nectar"), archived from the original on 2011-08-20, retrieved 2006-07-25

Grouped

  1. ^ 2:87, 2:136, 2:253, 3:45, 3:52, 3:55, 3:59, 3:84, 4:157, 4:163, 4:171, 5:46, 5:78, 5:110, 5:112, 5:114, 5:116, 6:85, 19:34, 33:7, 42:13, 43:63, 57:27, 61:6, 61:14
  2. ^ 3:45, 4:171, 4:172, 5:17, 5:72(2), 5:75, 9:30, 9:31
  3. ^ 2:87, 2:253, 3:45, 4:157, 4:171, 5:17, 5:46, 5:72, 5:75, 5:78, 5:110, 5:112, 5:114, 5:116, 9:31, 19:34, 23:50, 33:7, 43:57, 57:27, 61:6, 61:14
  4. ^ 19:19, 19:20, 19:21, 19:29, 19:35, 19:88, 19:91, 19:92, 21:91
  5. ^ 3:39, 3:45, 3:48, 4:171, 5:46, 5:110
  6. ^ 3:49, 4:157, 4:171, 19:30, 61:6
  7. ^ 19:21, 21:91, 23:50, 43:61
  8. ^ 19:19
  9. ^ 19:21
  10. ^ 19:30
  11. ^ 19:31
  12. ^ 19:34
  13. ^ 19:27
  14. ^ 43:57
  15. ^ 43:61
  16. ^ 4:159
  17. ^ 3:45
  18. ^ 2:87, 2:253, 3:46(2), 3:48, 3:52, 3:55(4), 4:157(3), 4.159(3), 5:110(11), 5:46(3), 5:75(2), 19:21, 19:22(2), 19:27(2), 19:29, 23:50, 43:58(2), 43:59(3), 43:63, 57:27(2), 61:6.
  19. ^ 3:49(6), 3:50, 3:52, 5:116(3), 5:72, 5:116(3), 19:19, 19:30(3), 19:31(4), 19:32(2), 19:33(4), 19:33, 43:61, 43:63(2), 61:6(2), 61:14.

External links

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