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List of asteroid-discovering observatories

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The list of asteroid-discovering observatories contains a section for each observatory which has discovered one or more asteroids, along with a list of those asteroids.

For each numbered asteroid, the Minor Planet Center lists one or more discoverers who have been given credit for the discovery. Sometimes these are individuals (by modern rules there can be no more than three co-discoverers), and sometimes the credit is given to an organization (for instance, Purple Mountain Observatory).

YouTube Encyclopedic

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  • ✪ Asteroids: Crash Course Astronomy #20
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  • ✪ Most MYSTERIOUS Discoveries Made In Space!
  • ✪ First Interstellar Asteroid seen in our Solar System
  • ✪ Are explosions on the Sun a threat to us?

Transcription

When you look at a diagram of the solar system, you’ll see a big gap between Mars and Jupiter. A few centuries ago, that gap bugged astronomers; they really wanted there to be a planet in there. On the first day of the 19th century—January 1, 1801—they got their wish. Kinda. Italian astronomer Giuseppi Piazzi found a point of light moving at just the right speed to be the desired planet, but it was just a dot, and too faint to physically be a terribly big object. He suspected it might be a comet, but follow-up observations showed it wasn’t fuzzy. The object was given the name Ceres… but was it really a planet? Well... Hopes were high that Ceres was the wished-for planet between Mars and Jupiter. But then something rather amazing happened: A little over a year later, in 1802, another one was found. Then, in 1804, astronomers spotted a third one, and a fourth in 1807. It was becoming clear that a new class of solar system object had been discovered. Given that they were all just dots in the telescopes of the time, points of light like stars, they were given the name “asteroids”, which literally means star-like. By the end of the 19th century more than 450 had been found in total. The rate of discovery has accelerated over the years, and now, today, we know of hundreds of thousands. There are probably billions—yes, billions—of them larger than 100 meters across in the solar system, and over a million larger than 1 km in size. So what are we dealing with here? What are these asteroids? There’s not really a hard-and-fast definition of what’s an asteroid and what isn’t. But generally speaking, it’s a class of smaller bodies that are rocky or metallic that orbit the Sun out to Jupiter. Objects past Jupiter have special designations that we’ll get to in the next episode. Over the centuries we’ve learned a lot about them by scrutinizing them with telescopes. Asteroids come in a few basic flavors. Most, of them, about 3/4, are carbonaceous, which means they have lots of carbon in them. About 1/6th are silicaceous—heavy on the silicon-based materials, y’know, rock. The rest are lumped into one catch-all category, but are dominated by metallic objects, literally loaded with iron, nickel, and other metals. So many of them orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter that this region is now called the Main Belt. The Main Belt has structure; for example, there are very few asteroids about 425 million kilometers from the Sun. An asteroid at that distance would have an orbital period of about 4 years; a simple fraction of Jupiter’s 12 year period. Any asteroid there would feel a repeated tug from Jupiter’s mighty gravity, pulling it out of that orbit. The resulting gap is called the Kirkwood Gap, and there are several such asteroid deserts, all with simple multiples of Jupiter’s period. In this way, the main belt is like Saturn’s rings, whose gaps are carved out by the gravity of the orbiting moons. Another way to group asteroids is by orbit; some have similar orbits and may have formed from a bigger, parent asteroid that got disrupted by an impact. These groups are called families, and there are a few dozen known. For example, the Eunomia family has over 400 members, and are silicaceous, rocky asteroids and probably all formed from a parent body that was about 300 km across. When you watch movies, they always show spaceships dodging and swooping through asteroid belts, trying to evade the bad guys. But in reality our asteroid belt is mostly empty space! On average, decent-sized asteroids are millions of kilometers apart; so far that if you stood on an asteroid, odds are good you wouldn’t even be able to see another one with your naked eye. And despite their huge numbers, they don’t add up to much. If you took all the asteroids in the main belt and lumped ‘em together they’d be far smaller than our own Moon! Ceres is the biggest, at about 900 km across. It’s round, nearly spherical due to its own gravity crushing it into a ball. A funny thing about Ceres: As we write and record this episode, it’s being visited for the first time, by a spacecraft named Dawn. That means everything I tell you about this asteroid is probably about to be obsolete. But we do know a few things. Ceres probably has a rocky core surrounded by a water ice mantle. The amount of water in it is staggering; probably more than all the fresh water on Earth! It may even be liquid under the surface, like the oceans of Enceladus and Europa. Early images by Dawn as it approached the asteroid show its surface is heavily cratered, and some craters are very bright; they may be exposing ice under the surface, or just fresher, brighter material. There are tantalizing observations of localized water vapor on the surface, which may be from sublimation; ice turning directly into a gas due to the Sun’s heat, or it might indicate cryovolcanoes. Dawn also visited Vesta, which is the third largest but second most massive asteroid known. Vesta is round…ish, what’s called an oblate spheroid, flattened a bit like a ball someone’s sitting on. The southern hemisphere got hammered by impacts long ago, leaving a huge basin there. Several other main-belt asteroids have been visited by spacecraft, mostly via flybys. Lutetia, Gaspra, Steins, Mathilde. Ida is another, and was discovered to have a small moon orbiting it. In fact, a lot of asteroids have moons or are actually binary, with two similarly-sized bodies in orbit around each other. Kleopatra, a weird dog bone-shape rock, has two moons! You might think asteroids are just giant versions of rocks you might find in your garden; tough, solid, singular bodies. But it turns out that’s not the case. A few years ago scientists realized that asteroids have spent billions of years whacking into one another -- sometimes in high-speed collisions, sometimes more slowly. Slower hits can disrupt the asteroid, crack it, but not necessarily be strong enough to actually disrupt it so that it breaks apart. Over time, enough hits like that can leave behind what’s called a rubble pile: Individual rocks held together by their own gravity, like a bag of gravel, or a car window that’s been cracked and still holds its overall shape. This became more clear when the Japanese Hayabusa spacecraft visited the asteroid Itokawa, and saw what can only be described as a jumbled mess. The asteroid had no craters on it, and was littered with rubble and debris. It was also very low density, just what you’d expect for a loosely bound rock pile. It’s weird to think of some asteroids as being not much more than free-floating bags of gravel, but the Universe is under no obligation to adhere to our expectations. It’s full of surprises, and we need to keep our minds flexible. So here’s a question: why is there even a main asteroid belt at all? The solar system formed from a disk of material, and over time, that material started to clump into bigger and bigger pieces. As planets formed, they swept up and pulled in lots more stuff, and grew large. Jupiter consumed a lot of the material around it, but not all, and left a lot of debris inside its orbit. Some of this clumped together to form middling-sized objects, probably smaller than the planets we have now, but big enough to undergo differentiation: Heavy stuff like metals sank to the middle, and lighter stuff formed a mantle and crust. Collisions broke almost all of them apart, though, and that’s why we see asteroids with different compositions: Some are from the denser core, others from the lighter crust. There was probably a lot more material between Mars and Jupiter billions of years ago, but it either got eaten by Jupiter, or the planet’s immense gravity altered the asteroids’ orbits, flinging them away. This may be why Mars is so small, too; Jupiter robbed it of all of its food as it formed. While most asteroids live in the main belt, not all of them do. Some have orbits that cross that of Mars, taking them closer to the Sun. We call those -- wait for it -- Mars-crossing asteroids. Some have orbits that take them even closer to the Sun, crossing Earth’s orbit. We call those… Apollo asteroids. Eh? Gotcha! They’re named after the asteroid Apollo, the first of its kind to be found. Some have orbits that are almost entirely inside Earth’s orbit, called Aten asteroids. Aten and Apollo asteroids can get pretty close to Earth, so we call them Near-Earth Asteroids. Now, while they get close to us, that doesn’t mean they’ll hit us, because, for example, their orbits may be tilted, so their orbits and the orbit of the Earth don’t actually ever physically cross. But… some do have paths that literally intersect Earth’s. That doesn’t mean they’ll hit us every pass, either; after all, you can walk across a street without getting hit by a car. The problem comes when you try to occupy the same volume of space as a car at the same time. Astronomers, unsurprisingly, are very concerned about asteroids that can hit us. That’s why we have surveys, observatories scanning the skies, looking for them. This is a pretty important topic, and I’ll go into in more depth in a future episode. There’s another category of asteroid that exists due to a quirk of gravity. When a planet orbits a star, there are points along the planet’s orbit and near it in space where the gravitational forces are in balance. If you place an object there, it tends to stay there, like an egg in a cup. These are called Lagrange points. One of them is along the same orbit as the planet, but 60° ahead; another is 60° behind. The first such asteroid found was orbiting 60° ahead Jupiter, and was named Achilles, after the Greek hero in the Trojan war. As more were found, the naming convention stuck; asteroids ahead of Jupiter were named after Greek figures in the Trojan war, and those behind Jupiter were named for Trojans, and now we just call them all Trojan asteroids. Trojan asteroids have been spotted for Jupiter, Mars, Uranus, Neptune, and even Earth! Earth’s was found in 2010 using observations by an orbiting observatory called WISE, which scans the skies in infrared light, where asteroids glow due to their own heat. 2010 TK7, as it’s called, is about 300 meters across and 800 million kilometers away, orbiting the Sun ahead of the Earth. There are also asteroids that have orbits that are very similar to Earth’s, but are slightly elliptical and tilted with respect to ours. Because of this, they can stay relatively near the Earth in space, but don’t really orbit us; instead they sometimes get closer and sometimes recede. It’s pretty weird, but a natural outcome of orbital mechanics. Some people say these asteroids are moons of Earth, but it’s better to say they’re co-orbital with us. Only a few are known, the most famous being Cruithne, which can get as close as 12 or so million kilometers from us. Oh, one more thing. Originally, asteroids were named after female goddesses; Ceres, Vesta, Juno, and so on. But as hundreds more were found, and then thousands, we ran out of names. Eventually astronomers who discovered asteroids were allowed to name them -- through a lengthy proposal and acceptance process governed by the International Astronomical Union. They also get a number assigned to them as well. A lot of astronomers have asteroids named after them, including astronomers who study asteroids, like my friend Amy Mainzer, who works on the WISE mission—hers is 234750 Amymainzer—and Eleanor Helin, who discovered quite a few asteroids and comets. Hers is 3267 Glo; for her nickname. And this one? It’s a one-kilometer wide rock in the main belt, and goes by the name 165347 Philplait. Must be coincidence. Today you learned that asteroids are chunks of rock, metal, or both that were once part of smallish planets but were destroyed after collisions. Most orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter, but some get near the Earth. The biggest, Ceres is far smaller than the Moon but still big enough to be round and have undergone differentiation. Crash Course Astronomy is produced in association with PBS Digital Studios. Head over to their channel for even more awesome videos. This episode was written by me, Phil Plait -- I hosted it too. You probably saw that. The script was edited by Blake de Pastino, and our consultant is Dr. Michelle Thaller. It was directed by Nicholas Jenkins. The script supervisor and editor is Nicole Sweeney. The sound designer is Michael Aranda, and the graphics team is Thought Café.

Contents

Observatories

Andrushivka Astronomical Observatory

It is a private observatory near Andrushivka in Zhytomyr oblast, Ukraine. The observatory has IAU observatory code A50.[1]

It has discovered the following asteroids:

  • 117240 Zhytomyr
  • 120405 Svyatylivka
  • 133293 Andrushivka
  • 152217 Akosipov
  • 155116 Verkhivnya
  • 157271 Gurtovenko
  • 159011 Radomyshl
  • 159181 Berdychiv
  • 161962 Galchyn
  • 175636 Zvyagel
  • 177982 Popilnia
  • 181249 Tkachenko
  • 185250 Korostyshiv
  • 190026 Iskorosten
  • 199986 Chervone
  • 202778 Dmytria
  • 207585 Lubar
  • 207653
  • 207695 Olgakopyl
  • 207899 Grinmalia
  • 212465 Goroshky
  • 212723 Klitschko
  • 214487 Baranivka
  • 216451 Irsha
  • 216910 Vnukov
  • 217420 Olevsk
  • 220418 Golovyno
  • 221073 Ovruch
  • 226858
  • 227326 Narodychi
  • 235615
  • 239307 Kruchynenko
  • 240381 Emilchyne
  • 241192 Pulyny
  • 241538 Chudniv
  • 243204 Kubanchoria
  • 245890 Krynychenka
  • 246132 Lugyny
  • 246164 Zdvyzhensk
  • 251001 Sluch
  • 251018 Liubirena
  • 251449 Olexakorol'
  • 253536 Tymchenko
  • 261691
  • 262418 Samofalov
  • 263349
  • 266574
  • 269245 Catastini
  • 269251 Kolomna
  • 269252 Bogdanstupka
  • 274300 UNESCO
  • 274301 Wikipedia
  • 274333 Voznyukigor
  • 274334 Kyivplaniy
  • 274843 Mykhailopetrenko
  • 275225
  • 278386
  • 278609 Avrudenko
  • 278645 Kontsevych
  • 281459 Kyrylenko
  • 284754
  • 287875
  • 290127 Linakostenko
  • 291855 Calabròcorrado
  • 291923 Kuzmaskryabin
  • 293707 Govoradloanatoly
  • 294814
  • 295329
  • 295492
  • 295841 Gorbulin
  • 295842
  • 296987 Piotrflin
  • 300932 Kyslyuk
  • 302932 Francoballoni
  • 311784
  • 311786
  • 315276 Yurigradovsky
  • 315492
  • 316084 Mykolapokropyvny
  • 318794 Uglia
  • 325368 Ihorhuk
  • 325372
  • 328509
  • 329637
  • 330753
  • 332084 Vasyakulbeda
  • 332409
  • 332434
  • 335416
  • 336094
  • 336470
  • 341109
  • 342666
  • 345848
  • 348239 Societadante
  • 352167
  • 352654
  • 354252
  • 355683
  • 361329
  • 361674
  • 369274
  • 379350
  • 379355
  • 380590
  • 384074
  • 386102
  • 386167
  • 388057
  • 388952
  • 391834
  • 394805
  • 398474
  • 399673 Kadenyuk
  • 402964
  • 424648
  • 436049
  • 436371
  • 438571
  • 440794
  • 456963
  • 485152
  • 490218

Bohyunsan Optical Astronomy Observatory

The telescope atop Mount Bohyeon is among the items pictured on the back of the country's 10,000 won note.[2]
The telescope atop Mount Bohyeon is among the items pictured on the back of the country's 10,000 won note.[2]

The Korean Bohyunsan Optical Astronomy Observatory (BOAO), located at Mount Bohyeon near the city of Yeongcheon, is a member of the East-Asian Planet Search Network, an international collaboration between Korea, China and Japan. Each facility, BOAO (Korea), Xinglong Station (NAOC) (China), and Okayama Astrophysical Observatory (Japan), has a 2m class telescope, a high dispersion echelle spectrograph, and an iodine absorption cell for precise RV measurements, looking for extrasolar planets.[3]

It has discovered the following asteroids:

  • 34666 Bohyunsan
  • 63145 Choemuseon
  • 63156 Yicheon
  • 68719 Jangyeongsil
  • 72021 Yisunji
  • 72059 Heojun
  • 94400 Hongdaeyong
  • 95016 Kimjeongho
  • 99503 Leewonchul
  • 106817 Yubangtaek
  • 118931
  • 123532
  • 123741
  • 126172
  • 126578 Suhhosoo
  • 149119
  • 153236
  • 155813
  • 156550
  • 156984
  • 161021
  • 165390
  • 165406
  • 166139
  • 166143
  • 168878
  • 168911
  • 174076
  • 179553
  • 182205
  • 189787
  • 193158 Haechan
  • 193397
  • 193457
  • 193487
  • 201424
  • 203603
  • 201424
  • 203603
  • 205557
  • 205834
  • 208538
  • 219878
  • 225969
  • 228384
  • 234637
  • 234651
  • 244269
  • 247151
  • 250028
  • 250035
  • 252128
  • 257944
  • 270440
  • 279960
  • 285801
  • 286606
  • 287454
  • 302083
  • 306710
  • 307120
  • 310514
  • 313113
  • 322925
  • 323107
  • 336894
  • 337292
  • 347579
  • 350819
  • 354147
  • 416027
  • 434010
  • 455297
  • 483458

Cerro El Roble Astronomical Station

Between 1968 and 1982, Carlos Torres discovered or co-discovered with S. Cofré and others a number of asteroids from the Chilean Cerro El Roble Station. It has discovered the following asteroids:

Chichibu Observatory

This is the private observatory of Naoto Sato in Chichibu, Saitama, Japan.[4] This Observatory has IAU observatory code 369.[1]

It has discovered the following asteroids:

  • 6991 Chichibu
  • 7038 Tokorozawa
  • 7851 Azumino
  • 8581 Johnen
  • 8924 Iruma
  • 8933 Kurobe
  • 9230 Yasuda
  • 9418 Mayumi
  • 10224 Hisashi
  • 10880 Kaguya
  • 10916 Okina-Ouna
  • 11114
  • 11607
  • 12027 Masaakitanaka
  • 12031 Kobaton
  • 12432 Usuda
  • 12456 Genichiaraki
  • 12460 Mando
  • 12469 Katsuura
  • 13188 Okinawa
  • 13654 Masuda
  • 13694
  • 15884 Maspalomas
  • 15916 Shigeoyamada
  • 16716
  • 16723 Fumiofuke
  • 16790 Yuuzou
  • 16796 Shinji
  • 16826 Daisuke
  • 16853 Masafumi
  • 17612 Whiteknight
  • 17656 Hayabusa
  • 17657 Himawari
  • 17666
  • 18469 Hakodate
  • 18488
  • 18520 Wolfratshausen
  • 18553 Kinkakuji
  • 20193 Yakushima,
  • 21250 Kamikouchi
  • 21302 Shirakamisanchi
  • 21348 Toyoteru
  • 22470 Shirakawa-go
  • 23586
  • 23628 Ichimura
  • 23630
  • 23638 Nagano
  • 23649 Tohoku
  • 23963
  • 25302 Niim
  • 26223 Enari
  • 26224
  • 26902
  • 26990 Culbertson
  • 26998 Iriso
  • 27918 Azusagawa
  • 27982 Atsushimiyazaki
  • 27991 Koheijimiura
  • 27997 Bandos
  • 28173 Hisakichi
  • 28174 Harue
  • 29420 Ikuo
  • 29421
  • 29514 Karatsu
  • 29644
  • 31075
  • 31083
  • 31084
  • 31087 Oirase
  • 31095 Buneiou
  • 31179 Gongju
  • 31199
  • 32984
  • 32990 Sayo-hime
  • 32998
  • 33070
  • 33088
  • 33096
  • 35322
  • 35400
  • 35401
  • 37743
  • 37746
  • 39818
  • 43919
  • 43949
  • 44012
  • 48734
  • 52479
  • 52546
  • 52550
  • 52623
  • 52629
  • 53019
  • 55883
  • 58410
  • 58613
  • 58614
  • 58619
  • 58620
  • 58662
  • 58667
  • 65838
  • 69411
  • 69482
  • 69486
  • 69490
  • 69562
  • 73867
  • 73968
  • 90880
  • 90883
  • 90951
  • 90955
  • 90982
  • 96319
  • 96321
  • 96368
  • 96369
  • 96372
  • 100389
  • 100499
  • 100689
  • 100703
  • 101431
  • 118230 Sado
  • 120665
  • 120741 Iijimayuichi
  • 120974
  • 129600
  • 136743 Echigo
  • 136790
  • 160025
  • 162144
  • 164696
  • 175768
  • 192452
  • 200141
  • 210489
  • 251709
  • 269706
  • 297291
  • 336762

Dynic Astronomical Observatory

It has discovered the following asteroids:

Emerald Lane Observatory

It has discovered the following asteroids:

  • 34351 Decatur
  • 51599 Brittany
  • 61400 Voxandreae
  • 62701 Davidrankin
  • 64123
  • 65260
  • 72834 Guywells
  • 73073
  • 73196
  • 78284
  • 83596
  • 88377
  • 92586
  • 93164
  • 93466
  • 93490
  • 94404
  • 105272
  • 105508
  • 106096
  • 108917
  • 112483
  • 112484
  • 112539
  • 114910
  • 115492
  • 119195
  • 120148
  • 125266
  • 128345 Danielbamberger
  • 131327
  • 131414
  • 131446
  • 132296
  • 132298
  • 140603
  • 140632
  • 140633
  • 142155
  • 144553
  • 148772
  • 153175
  • 153757
  • 154345
  • 156036
  • 158330
  • 160165
  • 163363
  • 166422
  • 166857
  • 170072
  • 173449
  • 173875
  • 177191
  • 180683
  • 182595
  • 183379
  • 187987
  • 189076
  • 193801
  • 193947
  • 194124
  • 195511
  • 195874
  • 203866
  • 205558
  • 209155
  • 213785
  • 219382
  • 219590
  • 222873
  • 237607
  • 239965
  • 242244
  • 243777
  • 247588
  • 259901
  • 264594
  • 270980
  • 286262
  • 286762
  • 287059
  • 287436
  • 287622
  • 288473
  • 297382
  • 298268
  • 298353
  • 302625
  • 313062
  • 317288
  • 323243
  • 333352
  • 334264
  • 337704
  • 337814
  • 344229
  • 344291
  • 344455
  • 354414
  • 357096
  • 373481
  • 390557
  • 399394
  • 405121
  • 415816
  • 434064

Fair Oaks Ranch Observatory

It has discovered the following asteroids:

  • 13389 Stacey
  • 27267 Wiberg
  • 29651
  • 31318
  • 31420
  • 37280
  • 44468
  • 44545
  • 47044 Mcpainter
  • 49298
  • 49465
  • 56081
  • 76229
  • 82076
  • 85857
  • 106851
  • 123747
  • 134935
  • 138113
  • 138563
  • 153216
  • 155845

Geisei Observatory

Tsutomu Seki is the director of the Geisei Observatory in Geisei, Kōchi, Japan.

It has discovered the following asteroids:

  • 2396 Kochi
  • 2571 Geisei
  • 2582 Harimaya-Bashi
  • 2621 Goto
  • 2835 Ryoma
  • 2880 Nihondaira
  • 2961 Katsurahama
  • 3150 Tosa
  • 3182 Shimanto
  • 3262 Miune
  • 3431 Nakano
  • 3785 Kitami
  • 3822 Segovia
  • 3851 Alhambra
  • 3914 Kotogahama
  • 3935 Toatenmongakkai
  • 4039 Souseki
  • 4095 Ishizuchisan
  • 4097 Tsurugisan
  • 4101 Ruikou
  • 4223 Shikoku
  • 4256 Kagamigawa
  • 4290 Heisei
  • 4399 Ashizuri
  • 4411 Kochibunkyo
  • 4439 Muroto
  • 4441 Toshie
  • 4496 Kamimachi
  • 4498 Shinkoyama
  • 4505 Okamura
  • 4578 Kurashiki
  • 4606 Saheki
  • 4639 Minox
  • 4670 Yoshinogawa
  • 4675 Ohboke
  • 4841 Manjiro
  • 4865 Sor
  • 5058 Tarrega
  • 5113 Kohno
  • 5124 Muraoka
  • 5141 Tachibana
  • 5179 Takeshima
  • (5209) 1989 CW1
  • 5815 Shinsengumi
  • 5823 Oryo
  • 5824 Inagaki
  • 5862 Sakanoue
  • 5915 Yoshihiro
  • 5962 Shikokutenkyo
  • 5966 Tomeko
  • 5969 Ryuichiro
  • 6088 Hoshigakubo
  • 6237 Chikushi
  • 6244 Okamoto
  • 6302 Tengukogen
  • 6399 Harada
  • 6449 Kudara
  • 6458 Nouda
  • 6497 Yamasaki
  • 6514 Torahiko
  • 6606 Makino
  • 6660 Matsumoto
  • 6699 Igaueno
  • 6720 Gifu
  • 6925 Susumu
  • 6965 Niyodogawa
  • 6971 Omogokei
  • 7017 Uradowan
  • 7094 Godaisan
  • 7125 Eitarodate
  • 7235 Hitsuzan
  • 7274 Washioyama
  • 7287 Yokokurayama
  • 7289 Kamegamori
  • 7410 Kawazoe
  • 7415 Susumuimoto
  • 7463 Oukawamine
  • 7594 Shotaro
  • 7650 Kaname
  • 7693 Hoshitakuhai
  • 8083 Mayeda
  • 8163 Ishizaki
  • 8234 Nobeoka
  • 8367 Bokusui
  • 8375 Kenzokohno
  • 8387 Fujimori
  • 8428 Okiko
  • 8485 Satoru
  • 8492 Kikuoka
  • 8732 Champion
  • 8877 Rentaro
  • 8957 Koujounotsuki
  • 9032 Tanakami
  • 9062 Ohnishi
  • 9063 Washi
  • 9196 Sukagawa
  • 9198 Sasagamine
  • 9323 Hirohisasato
  • 9409 Kanpuzan
  • 9745 Shinkenwada
  • 9751 Kadota
  • 9756 Ezaki
  • 9852 Gora
  • 9870 Maehata
  • 9964 Hideyonoguchi
  • 10078 Stanthorpe
  • 10091 Bandaisan
  • 10094 Eijikato
  • 10167 Yoshiwatiso
  • 10300 Tanakadate
  • 10321 Rampo
  • 10547 Yosakoi
  • 10791
  • 10803 Caléyo
  • 10829 Matsuobasho
  • 11288 Okunohosomichi
  • 11294
  • 11296 Denzen
  • 11304 Cowra
  • 11321 Tosimatumoto
  • 11361 Orbinskij
  • 11516 Arthurpage
  • 11878 Hanamiyama
  • 11925
  • 11927 Mount Kent
  • 12084 Unno
  • 12277 Tajimasatonokai
  • 12335
  • 12690
  • 12706 Tanezaki
  • 12749
  • 13015 Noradokei
  • 13529 Yokaboshi
  • 13553 Masaakikoyama
  • 13569 Oshu
  • 13918 Tsukinada
  • 13933 Charleville
  • 13978 Hiwasa
  • 13989 Murikabushi
  • 14012 Amedee
  • 14880 Moa
  • 15238 Hisaohori
  • 15252 Yoshiken
  • 15723 Girraween
  • 15739 Matsukuma
  • 16503 Ayato
  • 16602 Anabuki
  • 17461
  • 17465 Inawashiroko
  • 17508 Takumadan
  • 17509 Ikumadan
  • 18365 Shimomoto
  • 18400
  • 18609 Shinobuyama
  • 18644 Arashiyama
  • 19156 Heco
  • 19161
  • 19197 Akasaki
  • 19210
  • 20040
  • 20102 Takasago
  • 21014 Daishi
  • 21016 Miyazawaseiroku
  • 21022 Ike
  • 21089 Mochizuki
  • 21126 Katsuyoshi
  • 21166 Nobuyukishouji
  • 21282 Shimizuyuka
  • 23468 Kannabe
  • 23478
  • 23504 Haneda
  • 23587 Abukumado
  • 24889 Tamurahosinomura
  • 26092
  • 26097
  • 26123
  • 26127 Otakasakajyo
  • 26151 Irinokaigan
  • 26837 Yoshitakaokazaki
  • 27716 Nobuyuki
  • 27739 Kimihiro
  • 27740 Obatomoyuki
  • 27790 Urashimataro
  • 29157 Higashinihon
  • 29186 Lake Tekapo
  • 29199 Himeji
  • 29249 Hiraizumi
  • 29252 Konjikido
  • 29337 Hakurojo
  • 30838
  • 30879 Hiroshikanai
  • 30888 Okitsumisaki
  • 32858 Kitakamigawa
  • 35076 Yataro
  • 35093 Akicity
  • 37729 Akiratakao
  • 39558 Kishine
  • 39566 Carllewis
  • 39712 Ehimedaigaku
  • 39809 Fukuchan
  • 42566 Ryutaro
  • 43792
  • 43794 Yabetakemoto
  • 43803
  • 43857
  • 46580 Ryouichiirie
  • 46592
  • 46595 Kita-Kyushu
  • 46596 Tobata
  • 48482 Oruki
  • 48495 Ryugado
  • 52285 Kakurinji
  • 52455 Masamika
  • 58164
  • 58184 Masayukiyamamoto
  • 58185 Rokkosan
  • 65716 Ohkinohama
  • 65894 Echizenmisaki
  • 79130 Bandanomori
  • 79149 Kajigamori
  • 79152 Abukumagawa
  • 90713 Chajnantor
  • 120462 Amanohashidate

Jurassien-Vicques Observatory

It has discovered the following asteroids:

  • 42113 Jura
  • 42191 Thurmann
  • 46095 Frederickoby
  • 57658 Nilrem
  • 68718 Safi
  • 77755 Delemont
  • 84902 Porrentruy
  • 88906 Moutier
  • 95771 Lachat
  • 99824 Polnareff
  • 113415 Rauracia
  • 115950 Kocherpeter
  • 117736 Sherrod
  • 125076 Michelmayor
  • 126160 Fabienkuntz
  • 126748 Mariegerbet
  • 128629
  • 129078 Animoo
  • 129137 Hippolochos
  • 143577
  • 143622 Robertbloch
  • 145456 bsxkoam njhalo[ajanmoksa IHO
  • 145559
  • 145565
  • 152190
  • 155018
  • 162937 Prêtre
  • 163380

Kingsnake Observatory

It has discovered the following asteroids:

  • 37390
  • 52004
  • 64838
  • 68570
  • 72945
  • 83972
  • 84618
  • 84650
  • 84717
  • 84722
  • 84830
  • 90434
  • 94771
  • 99373
  • 114094 Irvpatterson
  • 114096 Haroldbier
  • 114097
  • 114153
  • 115431
  • 115490
  • 115491
  • 116143
  • 125524
  • 126444 Wylie
  • 126445 Prestonreeves
  • 127929
  • 128266
  • 131701
  • 133558
  • 135515
  • 141397
  • 141398
  • 149924
  • 151197
  • 156372
  • 156703
  • 157072
  • 159167
  • 160956
  • 163958
  • 164185
  • 402070
  • 405304
  • 405305
  • 416546
  • 430523
  • 443992
  • 506466

Kitami Observatory

It has discovered the following asteroids:

  • 5356 Neagari
  • 5357 Sekiguchi
  • 7773 Kyokuchiken
  • 10092 Sasaki
  • 10117 Tanikawa
  • 10138 Ohtanihiroshi
  • 10146 Mukaitadashi
  • 10155 Numaguti
  • 10182 Junkobiwaki
  • 10301 Kataoka
  • 10304 Iwaki
  • 10319 Toshiharu
  • 10322 Mayuminarita
  • 10326 Kuragano
  • 10351 Seiichisato
  • 10352 Kawamura
  • 10355 Kojiroharada
  • 10366 Shozosato
  • 10546 Nakanomakoto
  • 10555 Tagaharue
  • 10559 Yukihisa
  • 10560 Michinari
  • 10561 Shimizumasahiro
  • 10569 Kinoshitamasao
  • 10570 Shibayasuo
  • 10608 Mameta
  • 10616 Inouetakeshi
  • 10760 Ozeki
  • 10767 Toyomasu
  • 10802 Masamifuruya
  • 10805 Iwano
  • 10821 Kimuratakeshi
  • 10822 Yasunori
  • 10823 Sakaguchi
  • 10827 Doikazunori
  • 10873
  • 10882 Shinonaga
  • 10884 Tsuboimasaki
  • 10885 Horimasato
  • 11072 Hiraoka
  • 11074 Kuniwake
  • 11079 Mitsunori
  • 11086 Nagatayuji
  • 11087 Yamasakimakoto
  • 11099 Sonodamasaki
  • 11280 Sakurai
  • 11282 Hanakusa
  • 11316 Fuchitatsuo
  • 11323 Nasu
  • 11324 Hayamizu
  • 11492 Shimose
  • 11494 Hibiki
  • 11495 Fukunaga
  • 11545 Hashimoto
  • 11546 Miyoshimachi
  • 11579 Tsujitsuka
  • 11593 Uchikawa
  • 11615 Naoya
  • 11664 Kashiwagi
  • 11860 Uedasatoshi
  • 11915 Nishiinoue
  • 11921 Mitamasahiro
  • 11928 Akimotohiro
  • 11929 Uchino
  • 11933 Himuka
  • 11949 Kagayayutaka
  • 11959 Okunokeno
  • 11978 Makotomasako
  • 11987 Yonematsu
  • 12012 Kitahiroshima
  • 12013 Sibatahosimi
  • 12047 Hideomitani
  • 12262 Nishio
  • 12278 Kisohinoki
  • 12326 Shirasaki
  • 12357 Toyako
  • 12362 Mumuryk
  • 12383 Eboshi
  • 12387 Tomokofujiwara
  • 12388 Kikunokai
  • 12391 Ecoadachi
  • 12411 Tannokayo
  • 12412 Muchisachie
  • 12415 Wakatatakayo
  • 12435 Sudachi
  • 12440 Koshigayaboshi
  • 12734 Haruna
  • 12746 Yumeginga
  • 12751 Kamihayashi
  • 12769 Kandakurenai
  • 12771 Kimshin
  • 12787 Abetadashi
  • 12810 Okumiomote
  • 13039 Awashima
  • 13094 Shinshuueda
  • 13140 Shinchukai
  • 13156 Mannoucyo
  • 13163 Koyamachuya
  • 13198 Banpeiyu
  • 13540 Kazukitakahashi
  • 13561 Kudogou
  • 13564 Kodomomiraikan
  • 13565 Yotakanashi
  • 13567 Urabe
  • 13576 Gotoyoshi
  • 13577 Ukawa
  • 13582 Tominari
  • 13605 Nakamuraminoru
  • 13608 Andosatoru
  • 13627 Yukitamayo
  • 13640 Ohtateruaki
  • 13942 Shiratakihime
  • 14004 Chikama
  • 14006 Sakamotofumio
  • 14010 Jomonaomori
  • 14027
  • 14028 Nakamurahiroshi
  • 14031 Rozyo
  • 14047 Kohichiro
  • 14105 Nakadai
  • 14401 Reikoyukawa
  • 14426 Katotsuyoshi
  • 14436 Morishita
  • 14441 Atakanoseki
  • 14443 Sekinenomatsu
  • 14445 Koichi
  • 14447 Hosakakanai
  • 14449 Myogizinzya
  • 14469 Komatsuataka
  • 14487 Sakaisakae
  • 14491 Hitachiomiya
  • 14492 Bistar
  • 14499 Satotoshio
  • 14555 Shinohara
  • 14850 Nagashimacho
  • 14853 Shimokawa
  • 14888 Kanazawashi
  • 14901 Hidatakayama
  • 14911 Fukamatsu
  • 14922 Ohyama
  • 14925 Naoko
  • 14926 Hoshide
  • 14927 Satoshi
  • 14981 Uenoiwakura
  • 14998 Ogosemachi
  • 15246 Kumeta
  • 15248 Hidekazu
  • 15250 Nishiyamahiro
  • 15303 Hatoyamamachi
  • 15316 Okagakimachi
  • 15330
  • 15351 Yamaguchimamoru
  • 15716 Narahara
  • 15729 Yumikoitahana
  • 15736 Hamanasu
  • 15740 Hyakumangoku
  • 15763
  • 15786
  • 15791
  • 15805 Murakamitakehiko
  • 15806 Kohei
  • 15821 Iijimatatsushi
  • 15843 Comcom
  • 15856 Yanokoji
  • 15857 Touji
  • 15910 Shinkamigoto
  • 15922 Masajisaito
  • 16439 Yamehoshinokawa
  • 16449 Kigoyama
  • 16463 Nayoro
  • 16466 Piyashiriyama
  • 16507 Fuuren
  • 16525 Shumarinaiko
  • 16528 Terakado
  • 16552 Sawamura
  • 16555 Nagaomasami
  • 16587 Nagamori
  • 16594 Sorachi
  • 16624 Hoshizawa
  • 16625 Kunitsugu
  • 16644 Otemaedaigaku
  • 16649
  • 16650 Sakushingakuin
  • 16671 Tago
  • 16675 Torii
  • 16680 Minamitanemachi
  • 16713
  • 16718 Morikawa
  • 16719 Mizokami
  • 17462 Takahisa
  • 17470 Mitsuhashi
  • 17501 Tetsuro
  • 17502 Manabeseiji
  • 17516 Kogayukihito
  • 17520 Hisayukiyoshio
  • 17544 Kojiroishikawa
  • 17546 Osadakentaro
  • 17567 Hoshinoyakata
  • 17603 Qoyllurwasi
  • 17615 Takeomasaru
  • 17617 Takimotoikuo
  • 18399 Tentoumushi
  • 18403 Atsuhirotaisei
  • 18404 Kenichi
  • 18418 Ujibe
  • 18453 Nishiyamayukio
  • 18472 Hatada
  • 18473 Kikuchijun
  • 18524 Tagatoshihiro
  • 19135 Takashionaka
  • 19159 Taenakano
  • 19160 Chikayoshitomi
  • 19165 Nariyuki
  • 19228 Uemuraikuo
  • 19230 Sugazi
  • 19288 Egami
  • 19303 Chinacyo
  • 19304
  • 19307 Hanayama
  • 19313
  • 19314
  • 19315
  • 20019 Yukiotanaka
  • 20038 Arasaki
  • 20080 Maeharatorakichi
  • 20096 Shiraishiakihiko
  • 20098 Shibatagenji
  • 20117 Tannoakira
  • 21015
  • 21033 Akahirakiyozo
  • 21035 Iwabu
  • 21117 Tashimaseizo
  • 21120
  • 21121
  • 21161 Yamashitaharuo
  • 21182
  • 21187 Setsuo
  • 21188
  • 21237 Suematsu
  • 21280
  • 21292
  • 21293
  • 21294
  • 22346 Katsumatatakashi
  • 22347 Mishinatakashi
  • 22351
  • 22352
  • 22355 Yahabananshozan
  • 22394 Kondouakira
  • 22395 Ourakenji
  • 22397
  • 22409
  • 22416
  • 22443
  • 22453
  • 22480
  • 23465
  • 23471
  • 23475
  • 23495
  • 23524
  • 23543
  • 23562
  • 23662
  • 23676
  • 24673
  • 24726
  • 24753
  • 24757
  • 24808
  • 24816
  • 24825
  • 24830
  • 24841
  • 24844
  • 24911 Kojimashigemi
  • 24919 Teruyoshi
  • 24960
  • 26104
  • 26171
  • 26213
  • 26828
  • 26852
  • 26855
  • 26886
  • 27749
  • 27787
  • 27809
  • 27815
  • 27816
  • 27844
  • 27861
  • 27882
  • 27887
  • 27920
  • 29159
  • 29167
  • 29251
  • 29299
  • 29374 Kazumitsu
  • 29408
  • 29474
  • 30805
  • 30886
  • 30924
  • 30925
  • 30943
  • 30944
  • 31063
  • 32815
  • 32854
  • 32909
  • 32919
  • 32973
  • 33008
  • 33059
  • 35141
  • 35143
  • 35169
  • 35170
  • 35171
  • 35172
  • 35231
  • 35298
  • 35299
  • 35343
  • 37565
  • 37625
  • 37626
  • 37669
  • 37693
  • 37764
  • 39703
  • 39723
  • 42527
  • 43851
  • 43870
  • 43899
  • 43926
  • 43935
  • 46588
  • 46589
  • 46590
  • 46608
  • 46609
  • 46610 Bésixdouze
  • 46631
  • 46634
  • 46649
  • 48433
  • 48448
  • 48590
  • 48591
  • 48635
  • 48680
  • 48686
  • 48739
  • 48748
  • 48802

Lime Creek Observatory

It has discovered the following asteroids:

  • 10195 Nebraska
  • 10392 Brace
  • 11726 Edgerton
  • 14969 Willacather
  • 16750 Marisandoz
  • 19294 Weymouth
  • 20328
  • 23763
  • 24918 Tedkooser
  • 27909
  • 28005
  • 29518
  • 31054
  • 33051
  • 46670
  • 48702
  • 49109 Agnesraab
  • 52688
  • 53008
  • 66846 Franklederer
  • 70721
  • 75057
  • 91598
  • 129539

Mount Nyukasa Station

It has discovered the following asteroids:

Nanyo Observatory

Nanyo Civil Astronomical Observatory was established in 1986 by the Nanyo Astronomical Lovers Club, located in Nan'yō, Yamagata, Japan. This astronomy society was founded in 1983.[5]

It has discovered the following asteroids:

Oaxaca Observatory

It has discovered the following asteroids:

Osservatorio Astronomico di Monte Agliale

It has discovered the following asteroids:

Osservatorio Astronomico di Pianoro

It has discovered the following asteroids:

Osservatorio Astronomico Sormano

The Sormano Astronomical Observatory in northern Italy has discovered the asteroid 344581 Albisetti. Previously accredited discoveries have now been reassigned to the various amateur astronomers using the observatory. These include Valter Giuliani, Piero Sicoli, Pierangelo Ghezzi, Francesco Manca, Paolo Chiavenna, Graziano Ventre and Augusto Testa.

Marco Cavagna, was also an observer and discoverer of minor planets at Sormano until his death in 2005. The observatory's 0.5-meter telescope was named in his honor.

Osservatorio Colleverde di Guidonia

It has discovered the following asteroids:

Rand Observatory

It has discovered the following asteroids:

  • 10194
  • 10895 Aynrand
  • 14075 Kenwill
  • 14093
  • 14529
  • 14531
  • 14983
  • 17638 Sualan
  • 17642
  • 18502
  • 27950
  • 29454
  • 31125
  • 32962
  • 32963
  • 32966
  • 35279
  • 35283 Bradtimerson
  • 44004
  • 52594
  • 52598
  • 52607
  • 65866
  • 69549
  • 85482
  • 100459
  • 101506
  • 120714
  • 160529
  • 192416
  • 221983
  • 267036

Rozhen National Astronomical Observatory

The Rozhen Observatory has discovered the following asteroids:

Sendai Astronomical Observatory

It has discovered the following asteroids:

Sunflower Observatory

It has discovered the following asteroids:

Tenagra II Observatory

It has discovered the following asteroids:

  • 48047 Houghten
  • 51430 Ireneclaire
  • 65213
  • 72993
  • 77971
  • 107379
  • 107396
  • 107397
  • 107398
  • 107559
  • 107560
  • 108324
  • 113967
  • 113974
  • 115775
  • 116192
  • 116651
  • 126950
  • 128026
  • 131186 Pauluckas
  • 131187
  • 131193
  • 131221
  • 132280
  • 149307
  • 149968 Trondal
  • 151875
  • 151885
  • 155142 Tenagra
  • 157456 Pivatte
  • 157747 Mandryka
  • 159717
  • 159853
  • 161299
  • 163226
  • 163630
  • 163731
  • 163733
  • 400726
  • 403549
  • 409134
  • 411200
  • 416477
  • 430688
  • 436343
  • 436352
  • 438955
  • 519108

Tzec Maun Observatory (Mayhill)

It has discovered the following asteroids:

  • 207901 Tzecmaun
  • 216433 Milianleo
  • 216439 Lyubertsy
  • 228165 Mezentsev
  • 229899
  • 231649 Korotkiy
  • 233925
  • 239664
  • 241418 Darmstadt
  • 249452
  • 257261 Ovechkin
  • 263932 Speyer
  • 264020 Stuttgart
  • 264061 Vitebsk
  • 264156
  • 266836
  • 269390 Igortkachenko
  • 269447
  • 269567 Bakhtinov
  • 269568
  • 269589 Kryachko
  • 274835 Aachen
  • 274981 Petrsu
  • 279037
  • 279274 Shurpakov
  • 279340
  • 281661
  • 281811
  • 281825
  • 283117
  • 296345
  • 296505
  • 296530
  • 296563
  • 296747
  • 296818
  • 296866
  • 296881
  • 301061 Egelsbach
  • 301221
  • 301394 Bensheim
  • 301522
  • 305754
  • 312561
  • 316042 Tilofranz
  • 316056
  • 325558 Guyane
  • 328472
  • 328477 Eckstein
  • 328704
  • 328734
  • 328791
  • 328830
  • 331056
  • 332633
  • 336698 Melbourne
  • 342277
  • 343138
  • 343251
  • 343323
  • 352945
  • 355924
  • 356157
  • 356261
  • 359243
  • 362241
  • 365243
  • 365758
  • 367605
  • 367864
  • 369400
  • 372562
  • 376084 Annettepeter
  • 378917 Stefankarge
  • 379155 Volkerheinrich
  • 379283
  • 384045
  • 389293 Hasubick
  • 398042
  • 400674
  • 400697
  • 400729
  • 407154
  • 407228
  • 407231
  • 410769
  • 410965
  • 410983
  • 411144
  • 414585
  • 419285
  • 419366
  • 419730
  • 509923
  • 529432

Uenohara Observatory

It has discovered the following asteroids:

  • 4381 Uenohara
  • 4749 Ledzeppelin
  • (5336) 1991 JE1
  • (5525) 1991 TS4
  • (5752) 1992 CJ
  • (5874) 1989 XB
  • (5882) 1992 WW5
  • (6409) 1992 VC
  • 7427
  • 7471
  • 7836
  • 7877
  • 7878
  • 8093
  • 8854
  • (9989) 1997 SG16
  • 11543
  • 11894
  • 11920
  • 12330
  • 12331
  • 12332
  • 12361
  • 13135
  • 13568
  • 13799
  • 14043
  • 14430
  • 14642
  • 14978
  • 15479
  • 15480
  • 16805
  • 16808
  • 16890
  • 17495
  • 24957
  • 25277
  • 25285
  • 25473
  • 25753
  • 26975
  • 28268
  • 29726
  • 32857
  • 44932
  • 44955
  • 46732
  • 47079
  • 47339
  • 48839
  • 52659
  • 53091
  • 53148
  • 53548
  • 56101
  • 59214
  • 60407
  • 63164
  • 66191
  • 66209
  • 69840
  • 70778
  • 71003
  • 74344
  • 74404
  • 74442
  • 79352
  • 80700
  • 85858
  • 100513
  • 101459
  • 118250
  • 118289
  • 121664
  • 129725
  • 134654
  • 134748
  • 136829
  • 137919
  • 145837
  • 145844
  • 146008
  • 168445
  • 168472
  • 186099
  • 192433
  • 202941
  • 257753

Uto Observatory

It has discovered the following asteroids:

Yatsugatake-Kobuchizawa

It has discovered the following asteroids:

Yorii Observatory

At Yorii Observatory, Japanese amateur astronomers Masaru Arai and Hiroshi Mori have discovered 45 minor planets (credited by the MPC as per 2016):Scr

Zeno Observatory

Tom Stafford discovered a number of asteroids since 1997, including 12061 Alena, 12533 Edmond, 13436 Enid, 13688 Oklahoma, at Zeno Observatory (observatory code 727) in Edmond, Oklahoma.

It has discovered the following asteroids:

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "List Of Observatory Codes". IAU Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 2009-08-12.
  2. ^ "Bohyunsan Optical Astronomy Observatory (BOAO)", Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, retrieved December 27, 2017.
  3. ^ Izumiura, Hideyuki (June 2005). "An East-Asian Extra-Solar Planet Search Network". Journal of the Korean Astronomical Society. 38 (2): 81–84. Bibcode:2005JKAS...38...81I. doi:10.5303/JKAS.2005.38.2.081.
  4. ^ Schmadel (2003:504)
  5. ^ Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names (5th ed.). Springer. p. 754. ISBN 3-540-00238-3.

External links

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