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List of Winter Olympics venues: H–K

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

For the Winter Olympics, there are six venues starting with the letter 'H', five venues starting with the letter 'I', three venues starting with the letter 'J', and ten venues starting with the letter 'K'.

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  • Epic History: Russia Part 2

Transcription

In 1612, Russia was in a state of anarchy. They called it 'The Time of Troubles'. The people were terrorised by war, famine and plague. Up to a third of them perished. Foreign troops occupied Moscow, Smolensk and Novgorod. But then, Russia fought back. Prince Pozharsky and a merchant, Kuzma Minin, led the Russian militia to Moscow, and threw out the Polish garrison. Since 2005, this event has been commemorated every 4th November, as Russian National Unity Day. The Russian assembly, the Zemsky Sobor, realised the country had to unite behind a new ruler, and elected a 16 year old noble, Mikhail Romanov, as the next Tsar. His dynasty would rule Russia for the next 300 years. Tsar Mikhail exchanged territory for peace, winning Russia much-needed breathing-space. His son, Tsar Alexei, implemented a new legal code, the Sobornoye Ulozheniye. It turned all Russian peasants, 80% of the population, into serfs – effectively, slaves - their status inherited by their children, and with no freedom to travel or choose their master. It was a system that dominated Russian rural life for the next 200 years. The head of the Russian Orthodox Church, Patriarch Nikon, imposed religious reforms that split the church between Reformers and 'Old Believers'. It's a schism that continues to this day. Ukrainian Cossacks, rebelling against the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, recognised Tsar Alexei as overlord in exchange for his military support. It led to the Thirteen Years War between Russia and the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Russia emerged victorious, reclaiming Smolensk and taking control of eastern Ukraine. A revolt against Tsarist government, led by a renegade Cossack, Stenka Razin, brought anarchy to southern Russia. It was finally suppressed: Razin was brought to Moscow and executed by quartering. The sickly but highly-educated Feodor III passed many reforms. He abolished mestnichestvo, the system that had awarded government posts according to nobility rather than merit, and symbolically burned the ancient books of rank. But Feodor died aged just 19. His sister Sofia became Princess Regent, ruling on behalf of her younger brothers, the joint Tsars Ivan V and Peter I. After centuries of conflict, Russia and the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth signed a Treaty of Eternal Peace. Russia then joined 'the Holy League' in its war against the Ottoman Empire. Sofia's reign also saw the first treaty between Russia and China, establishing the frontier between the two states. At age 17, Peter I seized power from his half-sister, Sofia. Peter became the first Russian ruler to travel abroad. He toured Europe with his 'Grand Embassy', seeking allies for Russia's war against Turkey, and learning the latest developments in science and shipbuilding. The war against Turkey was successfully concluded by the Treaty of Constantinople: Russia gained Azov from Turkey's ally, the Crimean Khanate, and with it, a foothold on the Black Sea. Peter made many reforms, seeking to turn Russia into a modern, European state. He demanded Russian nobles dress and behave like Europeans. He made those who refused to shave pay a beard tax. Peter built the first Russian navy; reformed the army and government; and promoted industry, trade and education. In the Great Northern War, Russia, Poland-Lithuania and Denmark took on the dominant power in the Baltic, Sweden. The war began badly for Russia, with a disastrous defeat to Charles XII of Sweden at Narva. But Russia won a second battle of Narva... Before crushing Charles XII's army at the Battle of Poltava. On the Baltic coast, Peter completed construction of a new capital, St.Petersburg. The building of what would become Russia's second largest city among coastal marshes was a remarkable achievement, though it cost the lives of many thousands of serfs. The Great Northern War ended with the Treaty of Nystad: Russia's gains at Sweden's expense made it the new, dominant Baltic power. Four years before his death, Peter was declared 'Peter the Great, Father of His Country, Emperor of All the Russias'. Peter was succeeded by his wife Catherine; then his grandson Peter II, who died of smallpox aged just 14. Empress Anna Ioannovna, daughter of Peter the Great's half-brother Ivan V, was famed for her decadence and the influence of her German lover, Ernst Biron. During Anna's reign, Vitus Bering, a Danish explorer in Russian service, led the first expedition to chart the coast of Alaska. He also discovered the Aleutian Islands, and later gave his name to the sea that separates Russia and America. After Anna's death, her infant grand-nephew, Ivan VI, was deposed by Peter the Great's daughter, Elizabeth. Ivan VI spent his entire life in captivity, until aged 23, he was murdered by his guards during a failed rescue attempt. Elizabeth, meanwhile, was famed for her vanity, extravagance, and many young lovers. But she was also capable of decisive leadership: in alliance with France and Austria, Elizabeth led Russia into the Seven Years War against Frederick the Great of Prussia. The Russian army inflicted a crushing defeat on Frederick at the Battle of Kunersdorf, but failed to exploit its victory. Meanwhile in St.Petersburg, the Winter Palace was completed at vast expense. It would remain the monarch's official residence, right up until the Russian Revolution of 1917. Peter III was Peter the Great's grandson by his elder daughter Anna Petrovna, who'd died as a consequence of childbirth. Raised in Denmark, Peter spoke hardly any Russian, and greatly admired Russia's enemy, Frederick the Great - so he had Russia swap sides in the Seven Years War, saving Frederick from almost certain defeat. Peter's actions angered many army officers. And he'd always been despised by his German wife, Catherine. Together they deposed Peter III, who died a week later in suspicious circumstances. His wife Catherine became Empress of Russia. Her reign would be remembered as one of Russia's most glorious...

Contents

H

Hamar Olympic Hall hosted the speed skating events for the 1994 Winter Olympics in Lillehammer.
Hamar Olympic Hall hosted the speed skating events for the 1994 Winter Olympics in Lillehammer.
Venue Games Sports Capacity Ref.
Håkon Hall 1994 Lillehammer Ice hockey (final) 10,500 [1]
Hakuba Ski Jumping Stadium 1998 Nagano Nordic combined (ski jumping), Ski jumping 45,000 [2]
Hamar Olympic Amphitheatre 1994 Lillehammer Figure skating, Short track speed skating 6,000 [3]
Hamar Olympic Hall 1994 Lillehammer Speed skating 10,600 [4]
Happo'one Resort 1998 Nagano Alpine skiing (downhill, super g, combined) 20,000 [5]
Holmenkollen National Arena 1952 Oslo Cross-country skiing, Nordic combined, Ski jumping 150,000 [6]

I

Intervales Ski-Hill hosted the ski jumping and ski jumping part of Nordic combined for both the 1932 and 1980 Winter Olympics held in Lake Placid.
Intervales Ski-Hill hosted the ski jumping and ski jumping part of Nordic combined for both the 1932 and 1980 Winter Olympics held in Lake Placid.
Venue Games Sports Capacity Ref.
Igman, Malo Polje 1984 Sarajevo Nordic combined (ski jumping), Ski jumping Not listed. [7]
Igman, Veliko Polje 1984 Sarajevo Biathlon, Cross-country skiing, Nordic combined (Cross-country skiing) Not listed. [7]
Iizuna Kogen Ski Area 1998 Nagano Freestyle skiing 12,000 [8]
Intervales Ski-Hill 1932 Lake Placid Nordic combined (ski jumping), Ski jumping 9200 [9]
Intervales Ski-Hill 1980 Lake Placid Nordic combined (ski jumping), Ski jumping 18,000 [10]

J

Venue Games Sports Capacity Ref.
Jahorina 1984 Sarajevo Alpine skiing (women) Not listed. [11]
James B. Sheffield Speed Skating Oval 1980 Lake Placid Speed skating Not listed. [12]
Jordal Amfi 1952 Oslo Ice hockey (final) 10,000 [13]

K

Venue Games Sports Capacity Ref.
Kadettangen 1952 Oslo Ice hockey Not listed [13]
Kanbayashi Snowboard Park 1998 Nagano Snowboarding (halfpipe) 10,000 [14]
Kanthaugen Freestyle Arena 1994 Lillehammer Freestyle skiing 15,000 [15]
Kazakoshi Park Arena 1998 Nagano Curling 1,924 [16]
Kominierte Kunsteisbahn für Bob-Rodel Igls 1976 Innsbruck Bobsleigh, Luge Not listed. [17]
Koševo Stadium 1984 Sarajevo Opening ceremonies 50,000 [18]
Kreuzjoch 1936 Garmisch-Partenkirchen Alpine skiing (combined - downhill) Not listed. [19]
Kreuzeck 1936 Garmisch-Partenkirchen Alpine skiing (downhill finish line) 17,000 [19]
Korketrekkeren 1952 Oslo Bobsleigh Not listed [20]
Kulm 1948 St. Moritz Ice hockey Not listed. [21]

References

  1. ^ 1994 Winter Olympics official report. Archived 2010-12-02 at the Wayback Machine. Volume 3. pp. 27-30. Accessed 8 December 2010.
  2. ^ 1998 Winter Olympics official report. Volume 2. pp. 203-5. Accessed 12 December 2010.
  3. ^ 1994 Winter Olympics official report. Archived 2010-12-02 at the Wayback Machine. Volume 3. pp. 57-60. Accessed 8 December 2010.
  4. ^ 1994 Winter Olympics official report. Archived 2010-12-02 at the Wayback Machine. Volume 3. pp. 51-6. Accessed 8 December 2010.
  5. ^ 1998 Winter Olympics official report. Volume 2. pp. 186-90. Accessed 12 December 2010.
  6. ^ 1952 Winter Olympics official report. Archived 2011-06-04 at the Wayback Machine. p. 33.
  7. ^ a b 1984 Winter Olympics official report. Archived 2008-02-26 at the Wayback Machine. pp. 18-58, 106-7. Accessed 22 November 2010. (in English), (in French), & (in Serbo-Croatian)
  8. ^ 1998 Winter Olympics official report. Volume 2. pp. 206-8. Accessed 12 December 2010.
  9. ^ 1932 Winter Olympics official report. Archived 2008-04-10 at the Wayback Machine. pp. 141-4. Accessed 12 October 2010.
  10. ^ 1980 Winter Olympics official report. Volume 1. pp. 36-9. Accessed 16 November 2010. (in English) & (in French)
  11. ^ 1984 Winter Olympics official report. Archived 2008-02-26 at the Wayback Machine. pp. 24-7, 107. Accessed 22 November 2010. (in English), (in French), & (in Serbo-Croatian)
  12. ^ 1980 Winter Olympics official report. Volume 1. pp. 43-7. Accessed 16 November 2010. (in English) & (in French)
  13. ^ a b 1952 Winter Olympics official report. Archived 2011-06-04 at the Wayback Machine. pp. 31-2.
  14. ^ 1998 Winter Olympics official report. Volume 2. pp. 209-11. Accessed 12 December 2010.
  15. ^ 1994 Winter Olympics official report. Archived 2010-12-02 at the Wayback Machine. Volume 3. pp. 23-6. Accessed 8 December 2010.
  16. ^ 1998 Winter Olympics official report. Volume 2. pp. 233-5. Accessed 12 December 2010.
  17. ^ 1976 Winter Olympics official report Archived 2008-02-26 at the Wayback Machine., pp. 143-5, 153, 186-7, 206-208. Accessed 10 November 2010. (in English), (in French), and (in German)
  18. ^ 1984 Winter Olympics official report. Archived 2008-02-26 at the Wayback Machine. pp. 10-14, 90. Accessed 16 November 2010. (in English), (in French), & (in Serbo-Croatian)
  19. ^ a b 1936 Winter Olympics official report. Archived 2007-08-09 at the Wayback Machine. pp. 139, 289-303. Accessed 16 October 2010. (in German)
  20. ^ 1952 Winter Olympics official report. Archived 2011-06-04 at the Wayback Machine. p. 38.
  21. ^ 1948 Winter Olympics official report. Archived 2008-04-10 at the Wayback Machine. pp. 6, 21, 23. Accessed 18 October 2010. (in French) & (in German)
This page was last edited on 27 April 2018, at 13:07
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