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List of Washington Redskins rushing leaders

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

John Riggins is the recordholder for single-season and career carries, career rushing yards, and single-season and career touchdowns.
John Riggins is the recordholder for single-season and career carries, career rushing yards, and single-season and career touchdowns.

The List of Washington Redskins football rushing leaders includes lists of Washington Redskins rushing single–season and career records for yardage, carries and touchdowns by Washington quarterbacks and running backs. The Redskins compete in the East Division of the National Football Conference. The franchise was founded as the Boston Braves, named after the local baseball franchise.[1] The team changed their name to the Redskins in 1933 and moved to Washington, D.C. in 1937.[2]

The Redskins have played over one thousand games. In those games, the club won five professional American football championships including two NFL Championships and three Super Bowls. The franchise captured ten NFL divisional titles and six NFL conference championships.[3]

The Redskins won the 1937 and 1942 Championship games, as well as Super Bowl XVII, XXII and XXVI. They also played in and lost the 1936, 1940, 1943 and 1945 Championship games, as well as Super Bowl VII and XVIII. They have made twenty-two postseason appearances, and have an overall postseason record of 23 wins and 17 losses. Only four teams have appeared in more Super Bowls than the Redskins: the Dallas Cowboys (eight), Pittsburgh Steelers (six), Denver Broncos (six), and New England Patriots (six); the Redskins' five appearances are tied with the San Francisco 49ers, Oakland Raiders and Miami Dolphins.[4]

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Transcription

The Heisman trophy is the most coveted individual award in college football. Just winning the award puts you in Hall of Fame company. But as prestigious as winning the Heisman is, the title doesn’t always guarantee success at the next level. Especially for quarterbacks. 15 of the last 20 Heisman winners are quarterbacks, and while Pro-Bowlers like Cam Newton and Carson Palmer fill the list, the number of Heisman winners who flamed out in the NFL is ever growing. So what does that mean for reigning Heisman-winner, and No. 1 overall pick Baker Mayfield? Well, history may not be on Mayfield’s side, and these six Heisman-winning quarterbacks know all too well what it’s like to be at the top in college football, only to wash out at the next level. Jason White. How many players can bounce back from consecutive ACL tears completely reinvent their style of play and go on to break school records? Not many, but Jason White did. In 2003 the Oklahoma quarterback broke the school record for touchdown passes in a single season and he led the Sooners to an undefeated season and a National Championship game appearance. The accolades sound like a surefire draft pick, but White’s two ACL surgeries left him undrafted in 2005. After lighting it up in college, White retired before ever suiting up in the NFL. Once a Heisman winner, White’s now best known for his appearances in air conditioning commercials in Oklahoma. Matt Leinart. The USC Trojans were at the top of the college football chain in 2004, with Matt Leinart as their leader. They crushed the competition an undefeated season, making Leinart’s Heisman win a runaway. His 5-touchdown performance in the National Championship game, that was a BCS record. But the success he had at USC never followed him to the NFL. Season-ending injuries hampered Leinart’s development, and he was never able to outplay Kurt Warner with the Arizona Cardinals. After short stints with the Houston Texans and Oakland Raiders, Leinart decided to hang it up in 2013. His pro career never took off, but because of Leinart’s phenomenal college career he was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 2017. Troy Smith. In the history of the Heisman trophy, no one has received a higher percentage of first place votes than Troy Smith. The Ohio State quarterback was a dual threat for the Buckeyes, and his performance against Michigan in the “Game of the Century,” cemented his Heisman status. A combination of Smith being undersized and his poor performance in the BCS Championship game against Florida, caused his draft stock to plummet. Eventually he went to the Ravens in the fifth round, but never became the projected star in Baltimore. Once Joe Flacco came into town Smith’s career with the Ravens was over. After one season with the 49ers, Smith spent two seasons playing in the Canadian Football League, but multiple run-ins with the law ended his professional football career. Tim Tebow. From his undeniable passion, to coining the term “Tebowing,” Tim Tebow’s time at Florida is well documented. Tebow broke Emmitt Smith’s record for most rushing touchdowns in a single season, and he carried the Gators to a national title in 2008. Tebow was an impressive mobile quarterback, but the same couldn't be said about his passing. His odd throwing mechanics and low accuracy ended his time in the NFL before it ever really got started. Tebow did pull off a playoff win in the 2011 Wild Card game against the Pittsburgh Steelers. The 80-yard touchdown pass to Demaryius Thomas in overtime, the highlight of his NFL career. Tebow is now trying to make it to the Big Leagues toiling in minor league baseball. Robert Griffin III. If it weren’t for injuries, RGIII wouldn’t even be on this list. After all, he did win Offensive Rookie of the Year in his first season in the NFL, and he broke all of the major quarterback records at Baylor, including the most 100-yard rushing games by a quarterback, and was supposed to be the Washington Redskins quarterback of the future when they traded up and drafted him No. 2 overall. In his rookie season RGIII led the Redskins to their first playoff appearance in five years, and set a rookie record for highest passer rating and he went to the Pro Bowl. Things were looking up in D.C. But the injuries kept piling up for Griffin, concussions, ACL tear, dislocated knee and with Kirk Cousins waiting in the wings, Washington released Griffin after three seasons. His career went from being one of the next great quarterbacks in the league, to a backup almost overnight. Johnny Manziel. Johnny Football. Money Manziel. There isn’t a college quarterback that commanded more attention than Johnny Manziel did while at Texas A&M. The first freshman to ever win the Heisman, Manziel gained national attention during his freshman season when he led the Aggies past No. 1 ranked Alabama in Tuscaloosa. Manziel’s larger than life personality and outspoken nature kept his name in the news always. Part of the reason he fell to the Cleveland Browns late in the first round of the NFL Draft. But Money Manziel was anything but money in his rookie season. His antics off the field caused him to lose the starting job to Josh McCown, and the Browns decided to cut him following the 2015 season after only two years with the team. Manziel is now in the Canadian Football League. Will Baker Mayfield be next on the list? He’s drawn comparisons to Johnny Manziel and Russell Wilson, but which path will he follow? Winning the Heisman solidifies a player’s mark on college football, but building on that success in the NFL is far from a guarantee.

Contents

Rushes

Alfred Morris is the recordholder for single-season rushing yards.
Alfred Morris is the recordholder for single-season rushing yards.
Rushes
Top 25 career
Name Rushes Start End
John Riggins 1,988 1976 1985
Larry Brown 1,530 1969 1976
Clinton Portis 1,489 2004 2008
Stephen Davis 1,383 1996 2002
Alfred Morris 1,078 2012 2015
Terry Allen 1,043 1995 1998
Earnest Byner 990 1989 1993
Mike Thomas 878 1975 1978
Cliff Battles 839 1932 1937
Don Bosseler 775 1957 1964
Charlie Harraway 719 1969 1973
George Rogers 697 1985 1987
Ladell Betts 659 2002 2007
Andy Farkas 556 1938 1944
Ricky Ervins 531 1991 1994
Rob Goode 520 1949 1955
Joe Washington 455 1981 1984
Dick James 447 1956 1963
Charley Taylor 442 1964 1974
Gerald Riggs 402 1989 1991
Dick Todd 368 1939 1948
Frank Filchock 362 1938 1945
Clarence Harmon 360 1977 1982
Bob Seymour 360 1940 1945
Joe Theismann 355 1974 1985
Top 25 single-season
Name Rushes Year
John Riggins 375 1983
Stephen Davis 356 2001
Clinton Portis 352 2005
Terry Allen 347 1996
Clinton Portis 343 2004
Clinton Portis 342 2008
Terry Allen 338 1995
Alfred Morris 335 2012
Stephen Davis 332 2000
John Riggins 327 1984
Clinton Portis 325 2007
George Rogers 303 1986
Earnest Byner 297 1990
Stephen Davis 290 1999
Larry Brown 285 1972
Alfred Morris 276 2013
Earnest Byner 274 1991
Larry Brown 273 1973
Alfred Morris 265 2014
Earnest Byner 262 1992
John Riggins 260 1979
Mike Thomas 254 1976
Larry Brown 253 1971
John Riggins 248 1978
Ladell Betts 245 2006

Rushing yards

Rushing yards
Top 25 career
Name Yards Start End
John Riggins 7,472 1976 1985
Clinton Portis 6,824 2004 2010
Larry Brown 5,875 1969 1976
Stephen Davis 5,790 1996 2002
Alfred Morris 4,713 2012 2015
Terry Allen 4,086 1995 1998
Earnest Byner 3,950 1989 1993
Cliff Battles 3,511 1932 1937
Mike Thomas 3,359 1975 1978
Ladell Betts 3,176 2002 2009
Don Bosseler 3,112 1957 1964
George Rogers 2,909 1985 1987
Charlie Harraway 2,659 1969 1973
Rob Goode 2257 1,949 1955
Joe Washington 2,070 1981 1984
Ricky Ervins 2,026 1991 1994
Andy Farkas 1,966 1938 1944
Joe Theismann 1,815 1974 1985
Brian Mitchell 1,751 1990 1999
Dick James 1,741 1956 1963
Dick Todd 1,573 1939 1948
Gerald Riggs 1,557 1989 1991
Charley Taylor 1,488 1964 1974
Clarence Harmon 1,374 1977 1982
Reggie Brooks 1,358 1993 1995
Keith Griffin 1,343 1984 1988
Top 25 single-season
Name Yards Year
Alfred Morris 1,613 2012
Clinton Portis 1,516 2005
Clinton Portis 1,487 2008
Stephen Davis 1,432 2001
Stephen Davis 1,405 1999
Terry Allen 1,353 1996
John Riggins 1,347 1983
Stephen Davis 1,318 2000
Clinton Portis 1,315 2004
Terry Allen 1,309 1995
Alfred Morris 1,275 2013
Clinton Portis 1,262 2007
John Riggins 1,239 1984
Earnest Byner 1,219 1990
Larry Brown 1,216 1972
George Rogers 1,203 1986
Ladell Betts 1,154 2006
John Riggins 1,153 1979
Larry Brown 1,125 1970
Mike Thomas 1,101 1976
George Rogers 1,093 1985
Alfred Morris 1,074 2014
Reggie Brooks 1,063 1993
Earnest Byner 1,048 1991
John Riggins 1,014 1978
Earnest Byner 998 1992
Top 5 single-game
Name Yards Year Opponent
Gerald Riggs 221 1989 Philadelphia Eagles
Cliff Battles 215 1933 New York Giants
George Rogers 206 1985 St. Louis Cardinals
Timmy Smith 204 1988 Denver Broncos
Alfred Morris 200 2012 Dallas Cowboys

Touchdowns

Touchdowns
Top 25 career
Name TDs Start End
John Riggins 79 1976 1985
Stephen Davis 45 1996 2002
Clinton Portis 43 2004 2008
Terry Allen 37 1995 1998
Larry Brown 35 1969 1976
George Rogers 31 1985 1987
Alfred Morris 29 2012 2015
Earnest Byner 25 1989 1993
Cliff Battles 23 1932 1937
Don Bosseler 22 1957 1964
Gerald Riggs 21 1989 1991
Andy Farkas 21 1938 1944
Charlie Harraway 20 1969 1973
Joe Theismann 17 1974 1985
Dick James 16 1956 1963
Rob Goode 16 1949 1955
Mike Thomas 15 1975 1978
Skip Hicks 12 1998 2000
Bob Seymour 12 1940 1945
Dick Todd 11 1939 1948
Charley Taylor 11 1964 1974
Sonny Jurgensen 10 1964 1974
Ladell Betts 10 2002 2007
Ed Sutton 9 1957 1959
Sammy Baugh 9 1937 1952
Top 23 single-season
Name TDs Year
John Riggins 24 1983
Terry Allen 21 1996
George Rogers 18 1986
Stephen Davis 17 1999
John Riggins 14 1984
John Riggins 13 1981
Alfred Morris 13 2012
Clinton Portis 11 2007
Gerald Riggs 11 1991
Stephen Davis 11 2000
Clinton Portis 11 2005
Terry Allen 10 1995
Rob Goode 9 1951
Clinton Portis 9 2008
John Riggins 9 1979
Larry Brown 8 1973
Skip Hicks 8 1998
Larry Brown 8 1972
John Riggins 8 1985
Alfred Morris 8 2014
Don Bosseler 7 1957
Earnest Byner 7 1989
Stephen Davis 7 2002
Clinton Portis 7 2006
George Rogers 7 1985

References

  1. ^ "History: History by Decades". Washington Redskins' Official Website. Archived from the original on 2007-10-29. Retrieved 2007-12-11.
  2. ^ "Washington Redskins (1937–present)". Sportsecyclopedia. Retrieved 2007-12-11.
  3. ^ "Washington Redskins History". CBS Sportsline. Retrieved 2008-08-24.
  4. ^ "NFL History". NFL History Network. Missing or empty |url= (help)
This page was last edited on 20 September 2019, at 19:52
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