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List of United States urban areas

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

This is a list of urban areas in the United States as defined by the United States Census Bureau, ordered according to their 2010 census populations. In the table, UA refers to "urbanized area" (urban areas with population over 50,000) and UC refers to "urban cluster" (urban areas with population less than 50,000). The list includes urban areas with a population of at least 50,000.

For the 2010 census, the Census Bureau redefined the classification of urban areas to "a densely settled core of census tracts and/or census blocks that meet minimum population density requirements, along with adjacent territory containing non-residential urban land uses as well as territory with low population density included to link outlying densely settled territory with the densely settled core. To qualify as an urban area, the territory identified according to criteria must encompass at least 2,500 people, at least 1,500 of which reside outside institutional group quarters." These criteria result in several large urban agglomerations that encompass multiple urban areas from the 2000 census. The Census Bureau is currently considering whether to split up the larger agglomerations, but published potential agglomerations in August 2010.

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  • Growth, Cities, and Immigration: Crash Course US History #25
  • Top 10 MOST DANGEROUS Cities In AMERICA
  • Urban Geography: Why We Live Where We Do
  • Largest Cities in the United States Over Time
  • New York City and Los Angeles Compared

Transcription

Episode 25: Immigrant Cities Hi, I’m John Green, this is CrashCourse U.S. History and today we’re going to continue our extensive look at American capitalism. Mr. Green, Mr. Green, I’m sorry are you saying that I grow up to be a tool of the bourgeoisie… Oh not just a tool of the bourgeoise, Me from the Past, but a card-carrying member of it. I mean, you have employees whose labor you can exploit because you own the means of production, which in your case includes a chalkboard, a video camera, a desk, and a xenophobic globe. Meanwhile Stan, Danica, Raoul, and Meredith toil in crushing poverty--STAN, DID YOU WRITE THIS PART? THESE ARE ALL LIES. CUE THE INTRO. intro So, last week we saw how commercial farming transformed the American west and gave us mythical cowboys and unfortunately not-so-mythical Indian reservations. Today we leave the sticks and head for the cities--as so many Americans and immigrants have done throughout this nation’s history. I mean we may like to imagine that the history of America is all “Go west young man,” but in fact from Mark Twain to pretty much every hipster in Brooklyn, it’s the opposite. So, population was growing everywhere in America after 1850. Following a major economic downturn in the 1890s, farm prices made a comeback, and that drew more and more people out west to take part in what would eventually be called agriculture’s golden age. Although to be fair agriculture’s real golden age was in like 3000 BCE when Mesopotamians were like, “Dude, if we planted these in rows, we could have MORE OF IT THAN WE CAN EAT.” So it was really more of a second golden age. But anyway, more than a million land claims were filed under the Homestead Act in the 1890s. And between 1900 and 1910 the populations of Texas and Oklahoma together increased by almost 2 million people. And another 800,000 moved into Kansas, the Dakotas, and Nebraska. That’s right. People moved to Nebraska. Sorry, I just hadn’t yet offended Nebraskans. I’m looking to get through the list before the end of the year. But one of the central reasons that so many people moved out west was that the demand for agricultural products was increasing due to … the growth of cities. In 1880, 20% of the American population lived in cities and there were 12 cities with a population over 100,000 people. This rose to 18 cities in 1900 with the percentage of urban dwellers rising to 38%. And by 1920, 68% of Americans lived in cities and 26 cities had a population over 100,000. So in the 40 years around the turn of the 20th century, America became the world’s largest industrial power and went from being predominantly rural to largely urban. This is, to use a technical historian term, a really big deal. Because it didn’t just make cities possible, but also their products. It’s no coincidence that while all this was happening, we were getting cool stuff like electric lights and moving picture cameras. Neither of which were invented by Thomas Edison. I don’t know if you’ve noticed, but suddenly there are a lot more photographs in Crash Course U.S. History b-roll. So the city leading the way in this urban growth was New York, especially after Manhattan was consolidated with Brooklyn (and the Bronx, Queens and Staten Island) in 1898. At the turn of the century, the population of the 23 square miles of Manhattan Island was over 2 million and the combined 5 boroughs had a population over 4 million. But, while New York gets most of the attention in this time period, and all time periods since, it wasn’t alone in experiencing massive growth. Like, my old hometown of Chicago, after basically burning to the ground in 1871, became the second largest city in America by the 1890s. Also, they reversed the flow of the freaking Chicago River. Probably the second most impressive feat in Chicago at the time. The first being that the Cubs won two World Series. Even though I’m sorely tempted to chalk up the growth of these metropolises to a combination of better nutrition and a rise in skoodilypooping, I’m going to have to bow to stupid historical accuracy and tell you that much of the growth had to do with the phenomenon that this period is most known for: immigration. Of course, by the end of the 19th century, immigration was not a new phenomenon in the United States. After the first wave of colonization by English people, and Spanish people, and other Europeans, there was a new wave of Scandinavians, French people, and especially the Irish. Most of you probably know about the potato famine of the 1840s that led a million Irish men and women to flee. If you don’t know about it, it was awful. And the second largest wave of immigrants was made up of German speakers, including a number of liberals who left after the abortive revolutions of 1848. Alright, let’s go to the ThoughtBubble. The Irish had primarily been farmers in the motherland, but in America, they tended to stay in cities, like New York and Boston. Most of the men began their working lives as low-wage unskilled laborers, but over time they came to have much more varied job opportunities. Irish immigrant women worked too, some in factories or as domestic servants in the homes of the growing upper class. Many women actually preferred the freedom that factory labor provided and one Irish factory woman compared her life to that of a servant by saying: “Our day is ten hours long, but when it’s done, it’s done, and we can do what we like with the evenings. That’s what I’ve heard from every nice girl that’s tried service. You’re never sure that your soul is your own except when you’re out of the house.” [1] Most German speakers had been farmers in their home countries and would remain farmers in the U.S., but a number of skilled artisans also came. They tended to stay in cities and make a go of entrepreneurship. Bismarck himself saw emigration from Germany as a good thing saying, “The better it goes for us, the higher the volume of emigration.”[2] And that’s why we named a city in North Dakota after him. Although enough German immigrants came to New York that the lower east side of Manhattan came to be known for a time as Kleindeutschland (little Germany), many moved to the growing cities of the Midwest like Cincinnati and St. Louis. Some of the most famous German immigrants became brewers, and America is much richer for the arrival of men like Frederick Pabst, Joseph Schlitz, and Adolphus Busch. And by richer, I mean more drunker. Hey. Thanks for not ending on a downer, Thought Bubble. I mean, unless you count alcoholism. So but by the 1890s, over half of the 3.5 million immigrants who came to our shores came from southern and eastern Europe, in particular Italy and the Russian and Austro Hungarian empires. They were more likely than previous immigrants to be Jewish or Catholic, and while almost all of them were looking for work, many were also escaping political or religious persecution. And by the 1890s they also had to face new “scientific” theories, which I’m putting in air quotes to be clear because there was nothing scientific about them, which consigned them to different “races” whose low level of civilization was fit only for certain kinds of work and predisposed them to criminality. The Immigration Restriction League was founded in Boston in 1894 and lobbied for national legislation that would limit the numbers of immigrants, and one such law even passed Congress in 1897 only to be vetoed by President Grover Cleveland. Good work, Grover! You know, his first name was Stephen, but he called himself Grover. I would have made a different choice. But before you get too excited about Grover Cleveland, Congress and the President were able to agree on one group of immigrants to discriminate against: the Chinese. Chinese immigrants, overwhelmingly male, had been coming to the United States, mostly to the West, since the 1850s to work in mines and on the railroads. They were viewed with suspicion because they looked different, spoke a different language, and they had “strange” habits, like regular bathing. By the time the Chinese Exclusion Act went into effect in 1882 there were 105,000 people of Chinese descent living in the United States, mainly in cities on the West Coast. San Francisco refused to educate Asians until the state Supreme Court ordered them to do so and even then the city responded by setting up segregated schools. The immigrants fought back through the courts. In 1886, in the case of Yick Wo v. Hopkins the United States Supreme court ordered San Francisco to grant Chinese-operated laundries licenses to operate. Then in 1898 in United States v. Wong Kim Ark, the Court ruled that American born children of Chinese immigrants were entitled to citizenship under the 14th Amendment, which should have been a duh but wasn’t. We’ve been hard on the Supreme Court here at Crash Course, but those were two good decisions. You go, Supreme Court! But despite these victories Asian immigrants continued to face discrimination in the form of vigilante-led riots like the one in Rock Springs, Wyoming that killed 26 people, and congressionally approved restrictions, many of which the Supreme Court did uphold, so meh. Also it’s important to remember that this large-scale immigration--and the fear of it--was part of a global phenomenon. At its peak between 1901 and the outbreak of World War 1 in 1914, 13 million immigrants came to the United States. In the entire period touched off by the industrialization from 1840 until 1914, a total of 40 million people came to the U.S. But at least 20 million people emigrated to other parts of the Western Hemisphere, including Brazil, the Caribbean, Canada (yes, Canada) and Argentina. As much as we have Italian immigrants to thank for things like pizza (and we do thank you), Argentina can be just as grateful for the immigrant ancestors of Leo Messi. Also the Pope, although he has never once won La Liga. And there was also extensive immigration from India to other parts of the British Empire like South Africa; Chinese immigration to South America and the Caribbean; I mean, the list goes on and on. In short, America is not as special as it fancies itself. Oh it’s time for the Mystery Document? The rules are simple. I guess the author of the Mystery Document. I get it wrong and then I get shocked with the shock pen. Sorry I don’t mean to sound defeatist, but I don’t have a good feeling about this. Alright. “The figure that challenged attention to the group was the tall, straight, father, with his earnest face and fine forehead, nervous hands eloquent in gesture, and a voice full of feeling. This foreigner, who brought his children to school as if it were an act of consecration, who regarded the teacher of the primer class with reverence, who spoke of visions, like a man inspired, in a common classroom...I think Miss Nixon guessed what my father’s best English could not convey. I think she divined that by the simple act of delivering our school certificates to her he took possession of America.”[3] Uhh, I don’t know. At first I thought it might be someone who worked with immigrants, like Jane Addams, but then at the end suddenly it’s her own father. Jane Addams’s father was not an immigrant. Mary Antin? Does she even have a Wikipedia page?! She does? Did you write it, Stan? Stan wrote her Wikipedia page. AH. So, this document, while it was written by someone who should not have a Wikipedia page, points out that most immigrants to America were coming for the most obvious reason: opportunity. Industrialization, both in manufacturing and agriculture, meant that there were jobs in America. There was so much work, in fact, that companies used labor recruiters who went to Europe to advertise opportunities. Plus, the passage was relatively cheap, provided you were only going to make it once in your life, and it was fast, taking only 8 to 12 days on the new steam powered ships. The Lower East Side of Manhattan became the magnet for waves of immigrants, first Germans then Eastern European Jews and Italians, who tended to re-create towns and neighborhoods within blocks and sometimes single buildings. Tenements, these 4, 5 and 6 story buildings that were designed to be apartments, sprang up in the second half of the 19th century and the earliest ones were so unsanitary and crowded that the city passed laws requiring a minimum of light and ventilation. And often these tenement apartments doubled as workspaces because many immigrant women and children took in piecework, especially in the garment industry. Despite laws mandating the occasional window and outlawing the presence of cows on public streets, conditions in these cities were pretty bad. Things got better with the construction of elevated railroads and later subways that helped relieve traffic congestion but they created a new problem: pickpockets. “Pickpockets take advantage of the confusion to ply their vocation… The foul, close, heated air is poisonous. A healthy person cannot ride a dozen blocks without a headache.” So that’s changed! This new transportation technology also enabled a greater degree of residential segregation in cities. Manhattan’s downtown area had at one time housed the very rich as well as the very poor but improved transportation meant that people no longer had to live and work in the same place. The wealthiest, like Cornelius Vanderbilt and J.P. Morgan, constructed lavish palaces for themselves and uptown townhouses were common.[4][5] But until then, one of the most notable feature of gilded age cities like New York was that the rich and the poor lived in such close proximity to each other. And this meant that with America’s growing urbanization, the growing distance between rich and poor was visible to both rich and poor. And much as we see in today’s megacity, this inability to look away from poverty and economic inequality became a source of concern. Now one way to alleviate concern is to create suburbs so you don’t have to look at poor people, but another response to urban problems was politics, which in cities like New York, became something of a contact sport. Another response was the so-called progressive reform movement. And in all these responses and in the issues that prompted them – urbanization, mechanization, capitalism, the distribution of resources throughout the social order -- we can see modern industrial America taking shape. And that is the America we live in today. Thank you for watching. I’ll see you next week. Crash Course is produced and directed by Stan Muller. The script supervisor is Meredith Danko. The show is written by my history teacher, Raoul Meyer, Rosianna Halse Rojas, and myself. Our associate producer is Danica Johnson. And our graphics team is Thought Café. Every week, there’s a new caption for the libertage. If you’d like to suggest one, you can do so in comments where you can also ask questions about today’s video that will be answered by our team of historians. Thanks for watching Crash Course and as we say in my hometown, don’t forget to be awesome. Immigrant Cities - ________________ [1] Quoted in H.W. Brands, American Colossus: The Triumph of Capitalism 1865-1900. p. 265. [2] Ibid p. 267 [3] Quoted in Brands, American Colossus, p. 324 [4] Ibid p. 315 [5] quoted in Brands, American Colossus p. 320

Contents

2010 urban areas

Urban areas of the United States of America[1]
Rank Name[Note 1] Population
(2010 Census)
Land Area
(km²)
Land Area
(sq mi)
Density
(Population / km²)
Density
(Population / sq mi)
Central City
Population
(2010 Census)
Central City
Pop % of
Urban Area
Central City
Land Area
Central City
Land Area % of
Urban Area
1 New York--Newark, NY—NJ—CT 18,351,295 8,936.0 3,450.2 2,053.6 5,318.9 8,175,133 44.5% 302.643 8.8%
2 Los Angeles--Long Beach--Anaheim, CA 12,150,996 4,496.3 1,736.0 2,702.5 6,999.3 3,792,621 31.2% 468 27%
3 Chicago, IL—IN—WI 8,608,208 6,326.7 2,442.8 1,360.6 3,524.0 2,695,598 31.3% 227 9.3%
4 Miami, FL 5,502,379 3,208.0 1,238.6 1,715.2 4,442.4 399,457 7.3% 36 2.9%
5 Philadelphia, PA—NJ—DE—MD 5,441,567 5,131.7 1,981.4 1,060.4 2,746.4 1,526,006 28% 134 6.8%
6 Dallas--Fort Worth--Arlington, TX 5,121,892 4,607.9 1,779.1 1,111.5 2,878.9 1,197,816 23.4% 340 19.1%
7 Houston, TX 4,944,332 4,299.4 1,660.0 1,150.0 2,978.5 2,099,451 42.5% 639 38.5%
8 Washington, DC—VA—MD 4,586,770 3,423.3 1,321.7 1,339.9 3,470.3 681,170 14.9% 61 4.6%
9 Atlanta, GA 4,515,419 6,851.4 2,645.4 659.0 1,706.9 420,003 9.3% 133 5%
10 Boston, MA—NH—RI 4,181,019 4,852.2 1,873.5 861.7 2,231.7 617,594 14.8% 48 2.6%
11 Detroit, MI 3,734,090 3,463.2 1,337.2 1,078.2 2,792.5 713,777 19.1% 138 10.3%
12 Phoenix--Mesa, AZ 3,629,114 2,969.6 1,146.6 1,222.1 3,165.2 1,445,632 40% 517 45.1%
13 San Francisco--Oakland, CA 3,281,212 1,356.2 523.6 2,419.5 6,266.4 805,235 24.5% 46.9 9%
14 Seattle, WA 3,059,393 2,616.7 1,010.3 1,169.2 3,028.2 608,660 20% 83.9 8.3%
15 San Diego, CA 2,956,746 1,896.9 732.4 1,558.7 4,037.0 1,307,402 44.2% 325.2 44.4%
16 Minneapolis--St. Paul, MN 2,650,890 2,646.5 1,021.8 1,001.7 2,594.3 382,578 14.4% 54.9 5.4%
17 Tampa--St. Petersburg, FL 2,441,770 2,478.6 957.0 985.1 2,551.5 335,709 13.7% 113.4 11.8%
18 Denver--Aurora--Lakewood, CO 2,374,203 1,730.0 668.0 1,372.4 3,554.4 600,158 25.2% 153.3 22.9%
19 Baltimore, MD 2,203,663 1,857.1 717.0 1,186.6 3,073.3 620,961 28.2% 80.9 11.3%
20 St. Louis, MO—IL 2,150,706 2,392.2 923.6 899.0 2,328.5 319,294 14.8% 61.9 6.7%
21 San Juan, PR 2,148,346 2,244.7 866.7 957.1 2,478.8
22 Riverside--San Bernardino, CA 1,932,666 1,411.5 545.0 1,369.3 3,546.4
23 Las Vegas--Henderson, NV 1,886,011 1,079.6 416.8 1,746.9 4,524.5 583,756 31% 135.8 32.6%
24 Portland, OR—WA 1,849,898 1,358.1 524.4 1,362.1 3,527.8 583,776 31.6% 133 25.4%
25 Cleveland, OH 1,780,673 1,999.4 772.0 890.6 2,306.7 396,815 22.3% 77.7 10%
26 San Antonio, TX 1,758,210 1,546.5 597.1 1,136.9 2,944.6 1,327,407 75.5% 460.9 77.2%
27 Pittsburgh, PA 1,733,853 2,344.4 905.2 739.6 1,915.5 305,704 17.6% 55.4 6.1%
28 Sacramento, CA 1,723,634 1,219.8 471.0 1,413.0 3,659.7 466,488 27.1% 97.9 20.8%
29 San Jose, CA 1,664,496 740.7 286.0 2,247.2 5,820.3 945,942 56.8% 177.5 62%
30 Cincinnati, OH—KY—IN 1,624,827 2,040.2 787.7 796.4 2,062.6 296,943 18.3% 78 9.9%
31 Kansas City, MO—KS 1,519,417 1,755.6 677.8 865.5 2,241.6 459,787 30.3% 315 46.5%
32 Orlando, FL 1,510,516 1,548.0 597.7 975.8 2,527.3 238,300 15.8% 105 17.6%
33 Indianapolis, IN 1,487,483 1,827.9 705.7 813.8 2,107.7 820,445 55.2% 361.5 51.2%
34 Virginia Beach, VA 1,439,666 1,335.0 515.5 1,078.4 2,793.0 437,994 30.4% 249 48.3%
35 Milwaukee, WI 1,376,476 1,413.2 545.6 974.0 2,522.8 594,833 43.2% 96.2 17.6%
36 Columbus, OH 1,368,035 1,322.1 510.5 1,034.7 2,680.0 787,033 57.5% 217.2 42.5%
37 Austin, TX 1,362,416 1,354.7 523.0 1,005.7 2,604.8 790,390 58% 264.9 50.7%
38 Charlotte, NC—SC 1,249,442 1,920.5 741.5 650.6 1,685.0 731,424 58.5% 298 40.2%
39 Providence, RI—MA 1,190,956 1,411.7 545.1 843.7 2,185.1 178,042 14.9% 18.5 3.4%
40 Jacksonville, FL 1,065,219 1,373.6 530.4 775.5 2,008.5 821,784 77.1% 747.5 140.9%
41 Memphis, TN—MS—AR 1,060,061 1,288.0 497.3 823.0 2,131.6 646,889 61% 315.1 63.4%
42 Salt Lake City--West Valley City, UT 1,021,243 719.7 277.9 1,418.9 3,675.1 186,440 18.2% 109.1 39.3%
43 Louisville/Jefferson County, KY—IN 972,546 1,234.7 476.7 787.7 2,040.1
44 Nashville-Davidson, TN 969,587 1,459.4 563.5 664.4 1,720.7
45 Richmond, VA 953,556 1,274.7 492.2 748.1 1,937.5
46 Buffalo, NY 935,906 984.0 379.9 951.1 2,463.4
47 Hartford, CT 924,859 1,337.1 516.3 691.7 1,791.5
48 Bridgeport--Stamford, CT—NY 923,311 1,207.5 466.2 764.7 1,980.5
49 New Orleans, LA 899,703 651.1 251.4 1,381.8 3,578.9
50 Raleigh, NC 884,891 1,342.0 518.1 659.4 1,707.8
51 Oklahoma City, OK 861,505 1,063.5 410.6 810.0 2,098.0
52 Tucson, AZ 843,168 915.5 353.5 921.0 2,385.4
53 El Paso, TX—NM 803,086 649.0 250.6 1,237.5 3,205.0
54 Urban Honolulu, HI 802,459 440.7 170.2 1,820.7 4,715.6
55 Birmingham, AL 749,495 1,372.4 529.9 546.1 1,414.4
56 Albuquerque, NM 741,318 649.0 250.6 1,142.3 2,958.5
57 McAllen, TX 728,825 927.2 358.0 786.1 2,035.9
58 Omaha, NE—IA 725,008 702.4 271.2 1,032.1 2,673.3
59 Dayton, OH 724,091 910.2 351.4 795.5 2,060.4
60 Rochester, NY 720,572 840.4 324.5 857.4 2,220.8
61 Allentown, PA—NJ 664,651 896.9 346.3 741.1 1,919.3
62 Tulsa, OK 655,479 870.0 335.9 753.4 1,951.3
63 Fresno, CA 654,628 443.6 171.3 1,475.6 3,821.9
64 Sarasota--Bradenton, FL 643,260 846.1 326.7 760.3 1,969.0
65 Springfield, MA—CT 621,300 902.8 348.6 688.2 1,782.5
66 Concord, CA 615,968 527.7 203.8 1,167.2 3,023.2
67 Albany--Schenectady, NY 594,962 765.9 295.7 776.8 2,011.8
68 Baton Rouge, LA 594,309 950.0 366.8 625.6 1,620.3
69 Mission Viejo--Lake Forest--San Clemente, CA 583,681 389.9 150.5 1,497.1 3,877.6
70 Grand Rapids, MI 569,935 726.7 280.6 784.3 2,031.3
71 Akron, OH 569,499 842.7 325.4 675.8 1,750.3
72 New Haven, CT 562,839 792.8 306.1 709.9 1,838.7
73 Colorado Springs, CO 559,409 486.5 187.8 1,149.9 2,978.2
74 Knoxville, TN 558,696 1,134.8 438.2 492.3 1,275.1
75 Columbia, SC 549,777 984.3 380.0 558.6 1,446.7
76 Charleston--North Charleston, SC 548,404 759.8 293.4 721.8 1,869.5
77 Ogden--Layton, UT 546,026 563.5 217.6 969.1 2,509.9
78 Cape Coral, FL 530,290 855.5 330.3 619.9 1,605.4
79 Bakersfield, CA 523,994 358.6 138.4 1,461.4 3,785.0
80 Toledo, OH—MI 507,643 622.7 240.4 815.2 2,111.3
81 Worcester, MA—CT 486,514 787.6 304.1 617.7 1,599.8
82 Spokane, WA—ID 486,225 547.3 211.4 888.4 2,300.0 208,916 42.9% 60.02 28.4%
83 Provo--Orem, UT 482,819 437.6 169.0 1,103.2 2,857.4
84 Wichita, KS 472,870 556.2 214.7 850.2 2,202.1
85 Palm Bay--Melbourne, FL 452,791 600.8 232.0 753.6 1,951.9
86 Des Moines, IA 450,070 519.5 200.6 866.3 2,243.7
87 Harrisburg, PA 444,474 672.6 259.7 660.9 1,711.6
88 Murrieta--Temecula--Menifee, CA 441,546 418.9 161.7 1,054.2 2,730.2
89 Little Rock, AR 431,388 669.0 258.3 644.8 1,670.0
90 Poughkeepsie--Newburgh, NY—NJ 423,566 847.3 327.1 499.9 1,294.7
91 Syracuse, NY 412,317 504.9 194.9 816.7 2,115.2
92 Lancaster, PA 402,004 641.1 247.5 627.1 1,624.1
93 Madison, WI 401,661 391.1 151.0 1,027.0 2,660.0
94 Greenville, SC 400,492 829.4 320.3 482.9 1,250.6
95 Reno, NV—CA 392,141 425.7 164.4 921.1 2,385.5
96 Winston-Salem, NC 391,024 835.5 322.6 468.0 1,212.2
97 Youngstown, OH—PA 387,550 624.4 241.1 620.7 1,607.5
98 Augusta-Richmond County, GA—SC 386,787 672.2 259.5 575.4 1,490.4
99 Scranton-Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 381,502 442.3 170.8 862.5 2,233.8
100 Chattanooga, TN—GA 381,112 777.3 300.1 490.3 1,269.8
101 Port St. Lucie, FL 376,047 539.0 208.1 697.7 1,807.1
102 Stockton, CA 370,583 239.6 92.5 1,546.5 4,005.3
103 Oxnard, CA 367,260 218.6 84.4 1,680.4 4,352.2
104 Denton--Lewisville, TX 366,174 376.0 145.2 973.8 2,522.2
105 Modesto, CA 358,172 238.0 91.9 1,505.1 3,898.3
106 Flint, MI 356,218 611.0 235.9 583.0 1,510.0
107 Jackson, MS 351,478 628.0 242.5 559.6 1,449.5
108 Boise, ID 349,684 346.6 133.8 1,008.9 2,612.9
109 Palm Coast--Daytona Beach--Port Orange, FL 349,064 464.5 179.3 751.5 1,946.3
110 Durham, NC 347,602 470.7 181.7 738.5 1,912.6
111 Indio--Cathedral City, CA 345,580 372.4 143.8 927.9 2,403.3
112 Lancaster--Palmdale, CA 341,219 299.1 115.5 1,140.6 2,954.3
113 Pensacola, FL—AL 340,067 602.5 232.6 564.4 1,461.9
114 Victorville--Hesperia, CA 328,454 432.1 166.8 760.2 1,968.8
115 Mobile, AL 326,183 576.9 222.8 565.4 1,464.3
116 Corpus Christi, TX 320,069 311.5 120.3 1,027.4 2,661.0
117 Kissimmee, FL 314,071 409.9 158.3 766.2 1,984.4
118 Lansing, MI 313,532 409.7 158.2 765.3 1,982.2
119 Fort Wayne, IN 313,492 445.8 172.1 703.2 1,821.2
120 Greensboro, NC 311,810 479.7 185.2 650.0 1,683.5
121 Bonita Springs, FL 310,298 484.2 187.0 640.8 1,659.7
122 Fayetteville, NC 310,282 512.9 198.0 605.0 1,566.8
123 Santa Rosa, CA 308,231 253.8 98.0 1,214.5 3,145.5
124 Aguadilla--Isabela--San Sebastian, PR 306,196 619.7 239.3 494.1 1,279.7
125 Ann Arbor, MI 306,022 413.3 159.6 740.5 1,917.8
126 Shreveport--Bossier City, LA 298,317 479.7 185.2 621.8 1,610.5
127 Rockford, IL 296,863 396.3 153.0 749.1 1,940.1
128 Trenton, NJ 296,668 273.4 105.6 1,085.1 2,810.4
129 Fayetteville--Springdale--Rogers, AR—MO 295,083 486.2 187.7 606.9 1,571.8
130 Round Lake Beach--McHenry--Grayslake, IL—WI 290,373 395.2 152.6 734.7 1,902.8
131 Lexington-Fayette, KY 290,263 226.7 87.5 1,280.3 3,315.9
132 Huntsville, AL 286,692 543.3 209.8 527.7 1,366.8
133 Asheville, NC 280,648 686.0 264.9 409.1 1,059.5
134 Davenport, IA—IL 280,051 358.0 138.2 782.3 2,026.0
135 Canton, OH 279,245 431.1 166.5 647.8 1,677.7
136 South Bend, IN—MI 278,165 417.2 161.1 666.7 1,726.9
137 Antioch, CA 277,634 210.7 81.4 1,317.5 3,412.4
138 Springfield, MO 273,724 368.6 142.3 742.7 1,923.5
139 Peoria, IL 266,921 371.7 143.5 718.1 1,859.9
140 Reading, PA 266,254 269.0 103.8 990.0 2,564.0
141 Fort Collins, CO 264,465 284.0 109.7 931.1 2,411.6
142 Montgomery, AL 263,907 397.8 153.6 663.5 1,718.4
143 Lakeland, FL 262,596 378.2 146.0 694.4 1,798.4
144 Savannah, GA 260,677 428.6 165.5 608.2 1,575.1
145 Lincoln, NE 258,719 229.1 88.5 1,129.1 2,924.4
146 Santa Clarita, CA 258,653 198.7 76.7 1,301.5 3,371.0
147 Columbus, GA—AL 253,602 380.8 147.1 665.9 1,724.6
148 Lafayette, LA 252,720 462.6 178.6 546.3 1,414.8
149 Anchorage, AK 251,243 220.1 85.0 1,141.5 2,956.4
150 Atlantic City, NJ 248,402 324.1 125.1 766.4 1,985.0
151 Eugene, OR 247,421 224.7 86.8 1,101.2 2,852.0
152 Barnstable Town, MA 246,695 718.1 277.3 343.5 889.8
153 Tallahassee, FL 240,223 327.6 126.5 733.2 1,899.0
154 Conroe--The Woodlands, TX 239,938 345.3 133.3 694.9 1,799.7
155 Lubbock, TX 237,356 249.8 96.5 950.1 2,460.7
156 Salem, OR 236,632 196.6 75.9 1,203.4 3,116.8
157 Laredo, TX 235,730 170.1 65.7 1,385.7 3,588.8
158 York, PA 232,045 342.4 132.2 677.7 1,755.1
159 Evansville, IN—KY 229,351 307.8 118.8 745.1 1,929.9
160 Nashua, NH—MA 226,400 472.1 182.3 479.6 1,242.1
161 Wilmington, NC 219,957 346.5 133.8 634.9 1,644.3
162 Visalia, CA 219,454 164.3 63.4 1,335.8 3,459.6
163 Killeen, TX 217,630 219.7 84.8 990.8 2,566.1
164 Brownsville, TX 217,585 211.2 81.5 1,030.4 2,668.8
165 Appleton, WI 216,154 268.8 103.8 804.2 2,082.9
166 Myrtle Beach--Socastee, SC—NC 215,304 493.1 190.4 436.7 1,131.0
167 Concord, NC 214,881 466.7 180.2 460.4 1,192.4
168 Thousand Oaks, CA 214,811 221.8 85.6 968.6 2,508.8
169 Aberdeen--Bel Air South--Bel Air North, MD 213,751 339.6 131.1 629.4 1,630.1
170 Hickory, NC 212,195 677.6 261.6 313.2 811.1
171 Kennewick--Pasco, WA 210,975 265.4 102.5 795.0 2,059.0 181,756[a] 86.2%[a] 101.6[a] 99.1%[a]
172 Roanoke, VA 210,111 321.6 124.2 653.3 1,692.0
173 Kalamazoo, MI 209,703 341.1 131.7 614.9 1,592.5
174 Norwich--New London, CT—RI 209,190 393.7 152.0 531.4 1,376.3
175 Gulfport, MS 208,948 426.1 164.5 490.4 1,270.0
176 Green Bay, WI 206,520 272.0 105.0 759.4 1,966.7
177 Portland, ME 203,914 352.0 135.9 579.3 1,500.4
178 Huntington, WV--Ashland, KY--Ironton, OH 202,637 337.6 130.3 600.3 1,554.7
179 Winter Haven, FL 201,289 348.0 134.4 578.4 1,498.1
180 Bremerton, WA 198,979 353.5 136.5 562.9 1,457.9
181 Avondale--Goodyear, AZ 197,041 227.7 87.9 865.3 2,241.2
182 Amarillo, TX 196,651 210.2 81.2 935.3 2,422.5
183 Erie, PA 196,611 213.0 82.2 923.0 2,390.6
184 Santa Barbara, CA 195,861 144.6 55.9 1,354.1 3,507.0
185 Waterbury, CT 194,535 233.8 90.3 832.2 2,155.4
186 Fort Walton Beach--Navarre--Wright, FL 191,917 312.1 120.5 614.9 1,592.6
187 Gainesville, FL 187,781 225.4 87.0 833.0 2,157.4
188 Salinas, CA 184,809 126.8 49.0 1,457.8 3,775.7
189 Hagerstown, MD—WV—PA 182,696 345.3 133.3 529.1 1,370.2
190 Deltona, FL 182,169 249.8 96.5 729.2 1,888.6
191 Lorain--Elyria, OH 180,956 259.5 100.2 697.3 1,806.0
192 Spartanburg, SC 180,786 492.2 190.0 367.3 951.3
193 Cedar Rapids, IA 177,844 216.1 83.5 822.8 2,131.1
194 Fargo, ND—MN 176,676 182.0 70.3 970.8 2,514.3
195 Olympia--Lacey, WA 176,617 273.5 105.6 645.9 1,672.8
196 Waco, TX 172,378 233.8 90.3 737.4 1,910.0
197 College Station--Bryan, TX 171,345 185.0 71.4 926.3 2,399.0
198 McKinney, TX 170,030 191.9 74.1 885.9 2,294.5
199 North Port--Port Charlotte, FL 169,541 308.1 118.9 550.3 1,425.4
200 Gastonia, NC—SC 169,495 359.1 138.6 472.1 1,222.6
201 Danbury, CT—NY 168,136 341.0 131.7 493.1 1,277.1
202 High Point, NC 166,485 292.7 113.0 568.9 1,473.4
203 Vallejo, CA 165,074 108.8 42.0 1,517.1 3,929.3
204 Santa Cruz, CA 163,703 151.1 58.4 1,083.2 2,805.5
205 Hemet, CA 163,379 127.2 49.1 1,284.9 3,327.8
206 Springfield, IL 161,316 239.1 92.3 674.5 1,747.1
207 Muskegon, MI 161,280 290.8 112.3 554.5 1,436.2
208 Clarksville, TN—KY 158,655 283.8 109.6 559.1 1,448.0
209 Manchester, NH 158,377 223.1 86.2 709.8 1,838.4
210 Binghamton, NY—PA 158,084 192.0 74.1 823.2 2,132.2
211 Ocala, FL 156,909 290.3 112.1 540.5 1,399.9
212 Sioux Falls, SD 156,777 166.2 64.2 943.3 2,443.1
213 Medford, OR 154,081 167.6 64.7 919.2 2,380.8
214 Charleston, WV 153,199 254.4 98.2 602.3 1,559.9
215 Port Arthur, TX 153,150 273.4 105.6 560.2 1,450.9
216 Nampa, ID 151,499 179.7 69.4 842.9 2,183.1
217 Topeka, KS 150,003 206.1 79.6 727.7 1,884.8
218 Ponce, PR 149,539 114.3 44.1 1,308.6 3,389.4
219 New Bedford, MA 149,443 142.7 55.1 1,047.2 2,712.2
220 Sebastian--Vero Beach South--Florida Ridge, FL 149,422 250.3 96.7 596.9 1,546.0
221 Spring Hill, FL 148,220 297.8 115.0 497.7 1,289.1
222 Beaumont, TX 147,922 237.5 91.7 622.9 1,613.4
223 Lafayette, IN 147,725 166.0 64.1 889.7 2,304.3
224 Champaign, IL 145,361 121.5 46.9 1,196.7 3,099.5
225 Marysville, WA 145,140 211.9 81.8 685.0 1,774.0
226 Houma, LA 144,875 236.8 91.4 611.8 1,584.5
227 Elkhart, IN—MI 143,592 237.9 91.9 603.5 1,563.1
228 Lake Charles, LA 143,440 327.7 126.5 437.7 1,133.7
229 Panama City, FL 143,280 238.0 91.9 601.9 1,558.9
230 Frederick, MD 141,576 190.1 73.4 744.8 1,929.0
231 Fredericksburg, VA 141,238 201.5 77.8 700.8 1,815.2
232 Arecibo, PR 139,171 217.7 84.1 639.2 1,655.4
233 Tuscaloosa, AL 139,114 231.8 89.5 600.0 1,554.1
234 Macon, GA 137,570 253.9 98.0 541.9 1,403.6
235 Merced, CA 136,969 123.1 47.5 1,112.6 2,881.6
236 Pueblo, CO 136,550 192.2 74.2 710.4 1,840.0
237 Harlingen, TX 135,663 214.3 82.8 633.0 1,639.4
238 Yuma, AZ—CA 135,267 152.3 58.8 888.0 2,299.9
239 Racine, WI 133,700 128.0 49.4 1,044.8 2,705.9
240 Fairfield, CA 133,683 102.2 39.5 1,307.9 3,387.6
241 Murfreesboro, TN 133,228 200.3 77.3 665.1 1,722.7
242 Warner Robins, GA 133,109 260.6 100.6 510.8 1,323.0
243 Bloomington--Normal, IL 132,600 127.4 49.2 1,040.7 2,695.5
244 Leesburg--Eustis--Tavares, FL 131,337 244.6 94.4 537.0 1,391.0
245 Gainesville, GA 130,846 327.0 126.3 400.1 1,036.2
246 Santa Maria, CA 130,447 75.4 29.1 1,729.2 4,478.5
247 Tyler, TX 130,247 233.7 90.2 557.3 1,443.3
248 Yakima, WA 129,534 155.0 59.8 835.9 2,165.0
249 Athens-Clarke County, GA 128,754 254.8 98.4 505.2 1,308.5
250 Las Cruces, NM 128,600 167.6 64.7 767.4 1,987.6
251 Grand Junction, CO 128,124 204.1 78.8 627.8 1,626.0
252 Odessa, TX 126,405 152.6 58.9 828.1 2,144.8
253 Saginaw, MI 126,265 184.4 71.2 684.6 1,773.0
254 Simi Valley, CA 125,206 81.4 31.4 1,538.0 3,983.4
255 Columbia, MO 124,748 160.1 61.8 779.3 2,018.3
256 Kenosha, WI—IL 124,064 132.6 51.2 935.4 2,422.8
257 Fort Smith, AR—OK 122,947 183.3 70.8 670.8 1,737.3
258 Mauldin--Simpsonville, SC 120,577 216.4 83.6 557.1 1,442.9
259 Johnson City, TN 120,415 284.7 109.9 423.0 1,095.5
260 Duluth, MN—WI 120,378 182.5 70.5 659.5 1,708.0
261 Burlington, NC 119,911 234.2 90.4 512.0 1,326.0
262 South Lyon--Howell, MI 119,509 266.2 102.8 448.9 1,162.7
263 San German--Cabo Rojo--Sabana Grande, PR 118,199 247.3 95.5 478.0 1,237.9
264 Greeley, CO 117,825 106.8 41.2 1,103.3 2,857.5
265 Midland, TX 117,807 137.0 52.9 860.2 2,227.9
266 Greenville, NC 117,798 168.9 65.2 697.6 1,806.8
267 Redding, CA 117,731 184.0 71.1 639.7 1,656.8
268 Utica, NY 117,328 161.6 62.4 726.1 1,880.6
269 Leominster--Fitchburg, MA 116,960 168.4 65.0 694.3 1,798.3
270 Yuba City, CA 116,719 100.1 38.7 1,165.7 3,019.3
271 Lynchburg, VA 116,636 230.0 88.8 507.1 1,313.3
272 Monroe, LA 116,533 212.2 81.9 549.1 1,422.1
273 Billings, MT 114,773 137.2 53.0 836.7 2,167.0
274 Boulder, CO 114,591 84.1 32.5 1,361.9 3,527.3
275 Bellingham, WA 114,473 124.6 48.1 918.5 2,378.8
276 Seaside--Monterey, CA 114,237 100.2 38.7 1,139.9 2,952.3
277 Kailua (Honolulu County)--Kaneohe, HI 113,682 101.1 39.0 1,124.4 2,912.3
278 Waterloo, IA 113,418 161.2 62.2 703.7 1,822.5
279 Lady Lake--The Villages, FL 112,991 184.1 71.1 613.9 1,589.9
280 Dover, DE 110,769 191.7 74.0 577.7 1,496.3
281 St. Cloud, MN 110,621 130.1 50.3 850.1 2,201.6
282 Abilene, TX 110,421 141.8 54.7 779.0 2,017.5
283 Waldorf, MD 109,919 176.1 68.0 624.4 1,617.1
284 Mayagüez, PR 109,572 139.2 53.7 787.3 2,039.0
285 Burlington, VT 108,740 159.9 61.8 679.8 1,760.8
286 Bloomington, IN 108,657 116.0 44.8 936.5 2,425.5
287 Pottstown, PA 107,682 204.2 78.8 527.4 1,366.1
288 Rochester, MN 107,677 131.0 50.6 821.9 2,128.8
289 El Centro--Calexico, CA 107,672 77.7 30.0 1,386.0 3,589.6
290 Iowa City, IA 106,621 118.0 45.6 903.2 2,339.4
291 Kingsport, TN—VA 106,571 294.1 113.6 362.3 938.5
292 Sioux City, IA—NE—SD 106,494 140.8 54.4 756.2 1,958.7
293 Texas City, TX 106,383 196.9 76.0 540.4 1,399.6
294 Jacksonville, NC 105,419 184.8 71.3 570.6 1,477.8
295 Rock Hill, SC 104,996 247.7 95.6 424.0 1,098.1
296 Norman, OK 103,898 116.2 44.9 893.9 2,315.2
297 Eau Claire, WI 102,852 178.7 69.0 575.5 1,490.6
298 La Crosse, WI—MN 100,868 132.1 51.0 763.8 1,978.1
299 Holland, MI 99,941 153.4 59.2 651.3 1,686.9
300 Turlock, CA 99,904 66.8 25.8 1,495.7 3,873.8
301 Wichita Falls, TX 99,437 130.4 50.4 762.3 1,974.4
302 Longview, TX 98,884 215.1 83.0 459.8 1,190.9
303 Gilroy--Morgan Hill, CA 98,413 117.7 45.4 836.2 2,165.8
305 St. George, UT 98,370 116.3 44.9 846.0 2,191.2
306 Chico, CA 98,176 89.1 34.4 1,101.6 2,853.2
307 Salisbury, MD—DE 98,081 183.1 70.7 535.6 1,387.3
308 Middletown, OH 97,503 145.3 56.1 671.1 1,738.1
309 Albany, GA 95,779 183.5 70.8 522.0 1,352.0
310 Vineland, NJ 95,259 160.3 61.9 594.2 1,538.9
311 Logan, UT 94,983 113.8 43.9 834.8 2,162.2
312 Lawton, OK 94,457 114.2 44.1 827.5 2,143.1
313 Decatur, IL 93,863 153.3 59.2 612.2 1,585.5
314 Vacaville, CA 93,141 71.0 27.4 1,312.0 3,398.2
315 San Angelo, TX 92,984 120.9 46.7 769.2 1,992.1
316 Terre Haute, IN 92,742 138.4 53.5 669.9 1,735.1
317 Charlottesville, VA 92,359 89.5 34.6 1,031.9 2,672.7
318 Slidell, LA 91,151 151.8 58.6 600.5 1,555.4
319 Yauco, PR 90,899 120.6 46.6 753.9 1,952.5
320 Longmont, CO 90,897 67.9 26.2 1,338.1 3,465.7
321 Idaho Falls, ID 90,733 115.3 44.5 787.1 2,038.5
322 Muncie, IN 90,580 120.9 46.7 749.4 1,941.0
323 Temple, TX 90,390 140.1 54.1 645.1 1,670.7
324 Jackson, MI 90,057 149.4 57.7 602.9 1,561.5
325 Florence, SC 89,557 184.0 71.1 486.7 1,260.5
326 Santa Fe, NM 89,284 137.5 53.1 649.4 1,681.9
327 Mandeville--Covington, LA 88,925 169.9 65.6 523.4 1,355.7
328 Blacksburg, VA 88,542 132.6 51.2 667.6 1,729.0
329 Portsmouth, NH—ME 88,200 240.0 92.7 367.5 951.7
330 Anderson, IN 88,133 171.1 66.1 515.1 1,334.1
331 Dover--Rochester, NH—ME 88,087 172.0 66.4 512.0 1,326.1
332 Lawrence, KS 88,053 78.8 30.4 1,116.8 2,892.4
333 Hanford, CA 87,941 71.9 27.7 1,223.9 3,169.8
334 Tracy, CA 87,569 57.6 22.3 1,519.1 3,934.6
335 State College, PA 87,454 74.7 28.8 1,171.4 3,033.9
336 Port Huron, MI 87,106 156.6 60.4 556.4 1,441.1
337 Springfield, OH 85,256 126.8 49.0 672.3 1,741.2
338 Dalton, GA 85,239 209.3 80.8 407.2 1,054.6
339 Fajardo, PR 85,225 131.6 50.8 647.8 1,677.8
340 Lee's Summit, MO 85,081 107.0 41.3 795.0 2,059.0
341 Prescott Valley--Prescott, AZ 84,744 132.0 51.0 641.8 1,662.2
342 Napa, CA 83,913 66.9 25.8 1,254.8 3,250.0
343 Alton, IL—MO 83,890 141.9 54.8 591.0 1,530.6
344 Bend, OR 83,794 102.9 39.7 814.7 2,110.0
345 Manteca, CA 83,578 56.5 21.8 1,478.0 3,828.0
346 Alexandria, LA 82,804 169.8 65.5 487.8 1,263.4
347 Joplin, MO 82,775 166.8 64.4 496.2 1,285.0
348 Missoula, MT 82,157 117.1 45.2 701.7 1,817.5
349 Bismarck, ND 81,955 100.4 38.8 816.4 2,114.6
350 Kankakee, IL 81,926 96.2 37.2 851.2 2,204.6
351 Livermore, CA 81,624 63.4 24.5 1,287.9 3,335.6
352 Rapid City, SD 81,251 109.4 42.3 742.5 1,923.0
353 Wheeling, WV—OH 81,249 121.8 47.0 667.3 1,728.4
354 St. Joseph, MO—KS 81,176 108.4 41.9 749.0 1,939.9
355 Homosassa Springs--Beverly Hills--Citrus Springs, FL 80,962 234.3 90.5 345.6 895.0
356 Juana Díaz, PR 80,928 123.8 47.8 653.6 1,692.9
357 Hattiesburg, MS 80,358 178.7 69.0 449.7 1,164.6
358 Guayama, PR 80,155 105.5 40.7 759.8 1,967.9
359 Altoona, PA 79,930 96.8 37.4 825.3 2,137.5
360 Anniston--Oxford, AL 79,796 224.7 86.8 355.1 919.6
361 Lafayette--Louisville--Erie, CO 79,407 102.4 39.5 775.6 2,008.7
362 Madera, CA 78,413 58.0 22.4 1,352.1 3,501.9
363 Battle Creek, MI 78,393 137.3 53.0 570.9 1,478.5
364 Bowling Green, KY 78,306 117.6 45.4 665.9 1,724.7
365 Texarkana--Texarkana, TX—AR 78,162 166.8 64.4 468.6 1,213.6
366 Lebanon, PA 77,086 116.7 45.1 660.3 1,710.1
367 Valdosta, GA 77,085 144.3 55.7 534.2 1,383.6
368 Florence, AL 77,074 160.9 62.1 478.9 1,240.3
369 Newark, OH 76,068 109.1 42.1 697.2 1,805.8
370 Anderson, SC 75,702 191.9 74.1 394.5 1,021.8
371 Williamsburg, VA 75,689 144.8 55.9 522.6 1,353.5
372 Mansfield, OH 75,250 130.3 50.3 577.4 1,495.6
373 Lake Jackson--Angleton, TX 74,830 108.0 41.7 693.0 1,795.0
374 Auburn, AL 74,741 129.3 49.9 578.2 1,497.6
375 Wausau, WI 74,632 121.4 46.9 614.8 1,592.4
376 Oshkosh, WI 74,495 79.8 30.8 933.7 2,418.2
377 Cheyenne, WY 73,588 91.0 35.1 808.7 2,094.6
378 Watsonville, CA 73,534 59.2 22.8 1,243.1 3,219.5
379 Elizabethtown--Radcliff, KY 73,467 147.5 57.0 498.0 1,289.8
380 Sumter, SC 73,107 170.1 65.7 429.7 1,113.0
381 Lima, OH 72,852 135.6 52.4 537.4 1,391.7
382 Davis, CA 72,794 36.6 14.1 1,991.0 5,156.6
383 Westminster--Eldersburg, MD 72,714 149.4 57.7 486.6 1,260.2
384 Flagstaff, AZ 71,957 90.2 34.8 797.8 2,066.2
385 Jackson, TN 71,880 132.5 51.1 542.7 1,405.5
386 Camarillo, CA 71,772 57.0 22.0 1,259.9 3,263.0
387 Florida--Imbery--Barceloneta, PR 71,747 118.6 45.8 604.7 1,566.2
388 Sheboygan, WI 71,313 86.6 33.4 823.5 2,132.9
389 Weirton--Steubenville, WV—OH—PA 70,889 130.8 50.5 541.9 1,403.6
390 Bay City, MI 70,585 104.4 40.3 675.8 1,750.3
391 Owensboro, KY 70,543 87.6 33.8 805.4 2,086.0
392 Decatur, AL 70,436 151.0 58.3 466.6 1,208.4
393 Morgantown, WV 70,350 97.1 37.5 724.4 1,876.3
394 Porterville, CA 70,272 53.1 20.5 1,322.6 3,425.5
395 Pocatello, ID 69,809 80.3 31.0 869.2 2,251.3
396 Janesville, WI 69,658 79.7 30.8 873.9 2,263.4
397 Bristol--Bristol, TN—VA 69,501 165.5 63.9 420.0 1,087.8
398 Winchester, VA 69,449 96.3 37.2 721.1 1,867.7
399 St. Augustine, FL 69,173 111.5 43.1 620.3 1,606.5
400 Johnstown, PA 69,014 100.0 38.6 690.1 1,787.2
401 Hilton Head Island, SC 68,998 175.1 67.6 394.0 1,020.4
402 Dothan, AL 68,781 143.7 55.5 478.5 1,239.3
403 Lodi, CA 68,738 41.2 15.9 1,668.1 4,320.3
404 DeKalb, IL 68,545 66.8 25.8 1,026.3 2,658.1
405 West Bend, WI 68,444 99.7 38.5 686.6 1,778.3
406 Rocky Mount, NC 68,243 119.0 46.0 573.2 1,484.7
407 Elmira, NY 67,983 97.9 37.8 694.4 1,798.6
408 Carbondale, IL 67,821 126.1 48.7 538.0 1,393.3
409 Dubuque, IA—IL 67,818 87.5 33.8 774.9 2,007.0
410 Hammond, LA 67,629 198.5 76.6 340.7 882.5
411 Parkersburg, WV—OH 67,229 109.8 42.4 612.4 1,586.2
412 Wenatchee, WA 67,227 81.3 31.4 827.3 2,142.8
413 Harrisonburg, VA 66,784 84.3 32.6 792.2 2,051.8
414 Cleveland, TN 66,777 141.4 54.6 472.2 1,223.0
415 Zephyrhills, FL 66,609 112.7 43.5 591.3 1,531.4
416 Hanover, PA 66,301 93.5 36.1 709.2 1,836.8
417 Monessen--California, PA 66,086 115.8 44.7 570.6 1,477.9
418 Michigan City--La Porte, IN—MI 66,025 100.9 39.0 654.4 1,694.8
419 Glens Falls, NY 65,443 107.6 41.6 608.1 1,575.0
420 Jonesboro, AR 65,419 121.6 47.0 538.0 1,393.5
421 Conway, AR 65,277 102.8 39.7 634.9 1,644.3
422 Great Falls, MT 65,207 80.6 31.1 809.2 2,095.7
423 El Paso de Robles (Paso Robles)--Atascadero, CA 65,088 81.4 31.4 799.2 2,069.9
424 Casper, WY 64,548 78.6 30.3 821.4 2,127.3
425 Fairbanks, AK 64,513 142.8 55.1 451.9 1,170.4
426 Gadsden, AL 64,172 186.6 72.0 343.9 890.8
427 Saratoga Springs, NY 64,100 117.8 45.5 544.1 1,409.3
428 Petaluma, CA 64,078 55.2 21.3 1,161.2 3,007.6
429 Twin Rivers--Hightstown, NJ 64,037 91.3 35.2 701.7 1,817.3
430 Beckley, WV 64,022 157.9 61.0 405.4 1,050.0
431 Longview, WA—OR 63,952 85.1 32.9 751.4 1,946.1
432 Beloit, WI—IL 63,835 89.0 34.4 717.5 1,858.4
433 Los Lunas, NM 63,758 179.4 69.3 355.4 920.5
434 Victoria, TX 63,683 75.2 29.0 847.2 2,194.2
435 Mount Vernon, WA 62,966 89.3 34.5 705.3 1,826.6
436 Corvallis, OR 62,433 54.7 21.1 1,141.7 2,956.9
437 Kokomo, IN 62,182 93.9 36.3 662.0 1,714.7
438 Sherman--DenisonTX 61,900 93.1 35.9 665.2 1,722.9
439 Sebring--Avon Park, FL 61,625 119.6 46.2 515.3 1,334.7
440 Grand Forks, ND—MN 61,270 63.3 24.4 967.8 2,506.6
441 Bangor, ME 61,210 110.1 42.5 556.0 1,440.0
442 Goldsboro, NC 61,054 137.0 52.9 445.5 1,153.8
443 Benton Harbor--St. Joseph--Fair Plain, MI 61,022 120.9 46.7 504.8 1,307.5
444 Rome, GA 60,851 123.5 47.7 492.9 1,276.6
445 Ames, IA 60,438 60.2 23.2 1,004.5 2,601.7
446 Lewiston, ME 59,397 91.7 35.4 647.9 1,678.0
447 San Luis Obispo, CA 59,219 52.9 20.4 1,120.1 2,900.9
448 Pittsfield, MA 59,124 86.8 33.5 681.4 1,764.9
449 Morristown, TN 59,036 155.0 59.8 380.9 986.5
450 Midland, MI 59,014 116.2 44.9 507.8 1,315.2
451 Lexington Park--California--Chesapeake Ranch Estates, MD 58,875 129.3 49.9 455.2 1,179.0
452 Jefferson City, MO 58,533 103.6 40.0 565.1 1,463.7
453 Middletown, NY 58,381 81.1 31.3 719.8 1,864.3
454 Carson City, NV 58,079 59.8 23.1 971.3 2,515.7
455 Watertown, NY 57,840 106.0 40.9 545.5 1,412.7
456 Mankato, MN 57,584 68.3 26.4 843.0 2,183.4
457 Kingston, NY 57,442 110.9 42.8 517.7 1,340.9
458 Daphne--Fairhope, AL 57,383 143.1 55.3 401.0 1,038.7
459 Albany, OR 56,997 62.1 24.0 918.4 2,378.6
460 Hazleton, PA 56,827 80.9 31.2 702.5 1,819.5
461 Staunton--Waynesboro, VA 56,611 98.8 38.1 573.2 1,484.5
462 Williamsport, PA 56,142 68.6 26.5 818.0 2,118.7
463 Kahului, HI 55,934 43.2 16.7 1,294.9 3,353.9
464 Walla Walla, WA—OR 55,805 71.7 27.7 778.8 2,017.0
465 Woodland, CA 55,513 31.6 12.2 1,757.1 4,550.8
466 Hot Springs, AR 55,121 116.4 44.9 473.7 1,227.0
467 Columbus, IN 54,933 70.6 27.3 778.3 2,015.8
468 Fond du Lac, WI 54,901 74.7 28.9 734.7 1,903.0
469 Manhattan, KS 54,622 53.6 20.7 1,018.2 2,637.0
470 Titusville, FL 54,386 77.9 30.1 698.3 1,808.7
471 Delano, CA 54,372 25.7 9.9 2,116.9 5,482.7
472 East Stroudsburg, PA—NJ 54,316 134.9 52.1 402.5 1,042.5
473 Ithaca, NY 53,661 63.7 24.6 842.9 2,183.1
474 Bloomsburg--Berwick, PA 53,618 84.7 32.7 633.4 1,640.5
475 Pine Bluff, AR 53,495 96.3 37.2 555.5 1,438.7
476 Lake Havasu City, AZ 53,427 76.5 29.5 698.3 1,808.5
477 Farmington, NM 53,049 90.4 34.9 587.1 1,520.5
478 Cape Girardeau, MO—IL 52,900 90.7 35.0 583.0 1,510.1
479 San Marcos, TX 52,826 68.9 26.6 767.2 1,987.1
480 Sierra Vista, AZ 52,745 78.4 30.3 672.6 1,741.9
481 Cartersville, GA 52,477 131.1 50.6 400.4 1,037.1
482 Arroyo Grande--Grover Beach, CA 52,000 59.6 23.0 872.2 2,259.0
483 Lewiston, ID—WA 51,924 73.1 28.2 710.4 1,839.9
484 Cumberland, MD—WV—PA 51,899 84.5 32.6 614.1 1,590.5
485 Lompoc, CA 51,509 27.7 10.7 1,859.4 4,815.7
486 Hinesville, GA 51,456 80.7 31.1 637.9 1,652.3
487 Uniontown--Connellsville, PA 51,370 100.6 38.8 510.9 1,323.2
488 Casa Grande, AZ 51,331 57.7 22.3 890.1 2,305.4
489 Villas, NJ 51,291 87.7 33.9 584.6 1,514.0
490 Monroe, MI 51,240 83.1 32.1 616.3 1,596.3
491 Brunswick, GA 51,024 112.4 43.4 454.1 1,176.2
492 Danville, IL 50,996 77.2 29.8 660.6 1,710.9
493 Chambersburg, PA 50,887 96.8 37.4 525.8 1,361.7
494 Grants Pass, OR 50,520 70.4 27.2 717.2 1,857.7
495 New Bern, NC 50,503 112.4 43.4 449.2 1,163.4
496 Grand Island, NE 50,440 72.9 28.1 692.3 1,793.1
497 Pascagoula, MS 50,428 102.4 39.5 492.4 1,275.4

Images

2010 urban agglomerations

Urban agglomerations of the United States of America
Rank Potential urban agglomeration Census 2000 UAs contained within the potential agglomeration Estimated population
(2006–2008)
1 New York-Philadelphia-Connecticut New York-Newark, NY-NJ-CT; Philadelphia-Camden, PA-NJ-DE-MD; Allentown-Bethlehem PA-NJ; Lancaster, PA; Pottstown, PA; Reading, PA; Trenton, NJ; Hightstown, NJ; Vineland, NJ; Poughkeepsie-Newburgh, NY; Bridgeport-Stamford, CT; Danbury, CT-NY; Hartford, CT; New Haven, CT; Norwich-New London, CT; Waterbury, CT; Springfield, MA-CT 29,028,337
2 Los Angeles-Riverside-San Bernardino Los Angeles-Long Beach-Santa Ana, CA; Riverside-San Bernardino, CA; Camarillo, CA; Hemet, CA; Oxnard, CA; Santa Barbara, CA; Santa Clarita, CA; Simi Valley, CA; Temecula-Murrieta, CA; Thousand Oaks, CA 15,492,749
3 Chicago-Kenosha-Racine-Round Lake Beach Chicago, IL-IN; Kenosha, WI; Round Lake Beach-McHenry-Grayslake, IL-WI; Racine, WI 8,944,789
4 Boston-Providence-Worcester Boston, MA; Providence, RI-MA; Worcester, MA-CT; Barnstable Town, MA; Leominster-Fitchburg, MA; New Bedford, MA; Dover-Rochester, NH; Manchester, NH; Nashua, NH; Portsmouth, NH 6,692,295
5 Baltimore-Washington Aberdeen, MD; Baltimore, MD; Washington, DC-VA-MD; St. Charles, MD 6,585,315
6 San Francisco-Oakland-San Jose San Francisco-Oakland, CA; San Jose, CA; Antioch, CA; Concord, CA; Livermore, CA; Vallejo, CA 5,870,212
7 Miami-Ft. Lauderdale-Pompano Beach-West Palm Beach-Homestead Miami-Ft. Lauderdale-Pompano Beach-West Palm Beach-Homestead, FL 5,334,685
8 Dallas-Fort Worth Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, TX; Denton-Lewisville, TX; McKinney, TX 5,006,527
9 Houston-Texas City Houston, TX; Texas City, TX; Galveston, TX; The Woodlands, TX 4,599,176
10 Detroit-Ann Arbor-Port Huron Detroit, MI; Ann Arbor, MI; Port Huron, MI; South Lyon-Howell-Brighton, MI 4,326,040
11 Atlanta-Gainesville Atlanta, GA; Gainesville, GA 4,196,670
- San Juan-Aguadilla-Ponce San Juan, PR; Aguadilla-Isabela-San Sebastián, PR; Arecibo, PR; Fajardo, PR; Florida-Barceloneta-Bajadero, PR; Guayama, PR; Juana Díaz, PR; Mayagüez, PR; Ponce, PR; San Germán-Cabo Rojo-Sabana Grande, PR; Yauco, PR 3,591,491
12 Phoenix-Mesa-Avondale Phoenix-Mesa, AZ; Avondale-Goodyear, AZ 3,328,183
13 San Diego-Mission Viejo San Diego, CA; Mission Viejo, CA 3,273,255
14 Seattle-Bremerton-Marysville Seattle, WA; Bremerton, WA; Marysville, WA 3,206,057
15 Cleveland-Akron-Canton-Lorain-Elyria Cleveland, OH; Akron, OH; Canton, OH; Lorain-Elyria, OH 2,722,194
16 Tampa-St. Petersburg-Lakeland-Winter Haven Tampa-St. Petersburg, FL; Lakeland, FL; Winter Haven, FL; Brooksville, FL 2,719,812
17 Cincinnati-Dayton-Middletown Cincinnati, OH-KY-IN; Dayton, OH; Middletown, OH; Springfield, OH 2,426,070
18 Denver-Boulder-Longmont Denver-Aurora, CO; Boulder, CO; Longmont, CO; Lafayette-Louisville, CO 2,339,587
19 St. Louis-Alton St. Louis, MO-IL; Alton, IL 2,184,037
20 Orlando-Ocala-Kissimmee Orlando, FL; Ocala, FL; Kissimmee, FL; Lady Lake, FL; Leesburg-Eustis, FL 1,814,061
21 Pittsburgh-Uniontown-Monessen Pittsburgh, PA; Uniontown-Connellsville, PA; Monessen, PA 1,792,892
22 Kansas City-Lee's Summit Kansas City, MO-KS; Lee's Summit, MO 1,468,106
23 Salt Lake City-Ogden-Layton Salt Lake City, UT; Ogden-Layton, UT 1,439,004
24 Indianapolis-Anderson Indianapolis, IN; Anderson, IN 1,367,392
25 Charlotte-Gastonia-Concord Charlotte, NC-SC; Gastonia, NC; Concord, NC; Rock Hill, SC 1,282,839
26 Nashville-Murfreesboro Nashville-Davidson, TN; Murfreesboro, TN 983,180

See also

Notes

  1. ^ In order to match the official lists from the U.S. Census Bureau and provide less clutter in the table, postal code abbreviations for the names of states are used in this column. For a list of the states and abbreviations used, please see the table below the map at this list of U.S. States.
  1. ^ a b c d The urban area is anchored by 3 adjacent cities.

References

  1. ^ "Census Urban Area List". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 30, 2016. 
  2. ^ "Metropolitan and NECTA Divisions published by CES". U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. January 28, 2011. 
  3. ^ "May 2009 Metropolitan and Nonmetropolitan Area Definitions". U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. August 16, 2010. 

Works cited

External links

This page was last edited on 14 August 2018, at 13:59
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