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List of United States Senators from North Carolina

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Current delegation

North Carolina ratified the Constitution on November 21, 1789, after the beginning of the 1st Congress. Its current senators are Republicans Thom Tillis and Richard Burr.

YouTube Encyclopedic

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  • ✪ North Carolina and South Carolina Compared
  • ✪ 100 Civics Questions with “ONE ANSWER EACH” for U.S. Citizenship Naturalization Test.

Transcription

North Carolina and South Carolina Two bordering states, along the East Coast of these United States. Both in the American South. Talladega Nights clip: Well the teacher asked me, what was the capital of North Carolina? I said Washington, D.C. Bingo! Nice! She said "no, you're wrong." I said "you've got a lumpy butt." I'm just so proud of you. The capitol of North Carolina is Raleigh, kid. Anyway, let's just start with the question why are there two Carolinas? Why’d they have to be all separate and stuff? So let’s start with some history. Many Native American tribes lived in what is today the Carolinas at the time of European arrival. There were dozens of Algonquian-speaking tribes in the east, and further inland, in the west, there were a few Siouan and Iroquoian-speaking tribes. The Spanish and French were the first Europeans to settle the area, but they didn’t make it too long. The Native Americans drove them out. And then, in 1629, an English dude named Sir Robert Heath claimed part of the area for...you guessed it...England, calling it the Province of Carolana. But due to the hostile Natives, the malaria and smallpox, and crazy pirates like Blackbeard going up and down the coast, Heath never colonized the area. Later, King Charles II let eight rich English dudes take over what was now called the Province of Carolina, to repay them for helping him become King. Charles II wanted the area as a buffer zone between the colonies of the north and Spanish Florida to the south. So when these eight dudes controlled Carolina between 1663 and 1729, they constantly fought, and had a hard time controlling the giant area anyway. The settlements in the north were so far away from the settlements of the south, after all. In 1669, Carolina became two provinces to try to solve this, the Albemarle province in the north and Clarendon province in the south. In 1712 they just went ahead and became two separate colonies. But really, historically the colonies have had much more in common than they have had differences. Both were two of the original 13 colonies, and both did not hesitate to rebel against the British during the American Revolution after Britain starting taxing the heck out of them. Both remained mostly rural after becoming states, relying on agriculture to drive their economies. And that agriculture relied heavily on slave labor. This slave labor helped several planters in the eastern, lowland areas of both states to become filthy rich as they produced lots of indigo, rice, tobacco, and especially cotton. More than half of farmers in both states, however, did not own slaves, and were self sufficient. They had small farms, and the ones who struggled the most tended to be in the west towards the mountains. During the Civil War, of course both North and South Carolina seceded from the Union and joined the Confederate States of America, but South Carolina was the very first state of all of them to secede. Also, for decades, South Carolina had leaders like John Calhoun who were much more outspoken about seceding and just talked a lot of trash in general about the North and them wanting to take away state’s rights (i.e. slavery). After the the Confederates lost the Civil War, both states were readmitted into the Union within days of each other in July 1868. Since both states had relied so much on slave labor before the war, their economies now both sucked now that slavery was illegal. It was an extremely difficult adjustment for everyone involved. After the Reconstruction era, it was the Jim Crow era in both Carolinas, where laws discriminating against blacks and promoting segregation were the norm. The progress that African Americans in the two states made during Reconstruction was halted for decades until the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 1960s. But of the two states, North Carolina seemed to be more of a place where the movement for equality thrived. North Carolina was where the sit-in protests began, and where the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee was created, after all. Around the same time as the Civil Rights Movement, the Carolinas, as well as the rest of the South, finally made the shift from a rural, more agricultural-based economy to a more urban, industrial-based economy. For the first time, cities started to quickly grow, but mostly in North Carolina. Today, Charlotte, the biggest city in North Carolina, is one of the fastest growing cities in the country. It had just over 134,000 people in 1950 and has grown to more than 850,000 today. So yeah, today North Carolina is much, much more urban than South Carolina. South Carolina’s largest city, Charleston, is also its oldest. It has just 138,000 people. Speaking of population, North Carolina has about twice as many people as South Carolina. It’s not twice as big in terms of actual land, but it’s about 62% bigger. It also has more coastline. Sure, South Carolina may be the tenth smallest state, but it’s the 24th largest in terms of population. Both states are two of the fastest growing states in the country. Yeah, check out my Sun Belt video if you haven’t caught that one yet. Both states border the Atlantic Ocean in the east and Appalachian Mountains in the west. Specifically, the Blue Ridge Mountains. Driving from the beaches to the western edges of each state, things go from fairly flat and palm trees to gently rolling to holy crap we’re in the freaking mountains! The mountains are a bit more dramatic in North Carolina, which has the highest peak in the Eastern United States, Mount Mitchell. And yeah, since South Carolina is a little bit further...um, you know...SOUTH, it does have a bit warmer temperatures overall than North Carolina. You know, a bit milder winters and less snow and ice. But it’s not a dramatic difference. And obviously there’s the east/west difference. The closer to the coast, the nicer, in general. The closer to the mountains, the cooler and less predictable, in general. Oh, and the eastern portion of both states has to worry about hurricanes. But the western portion still has to worry about tornadoes so you know... Both states have a really high African American population compared to most other states. With the legacy of slavery in both, that certainly make sense. North Carolina has a much larger Native American presence compared to South Carolina. Both states are pretty religious, with Christianity dominating as the most popular religion in both. Protestant Christianity, in particular. In terms of politics, South Carolina is definitely more conservative-leaning. North Carolina has become a swing state for presidential elections in recent years, while South Carolina hasn’t voted for a Democratic candidate since 1976, and that’s only because it was Jimmy Carter, who was the governor of Georgia, their next door neighbor. Both state legislatures are majority Republican, however. The North Carolina General Assembly and South Carolina General Assembly are pretty dang similar. Some state laws are noticeably different in the two states. The fireworks laws are much more lenient in South Carolina. North Carolina has decriminalized marijuana use and possession a bit, and will most likely legalize it before South Carolina does. Although it was really difficult to research taxes in both states, I’ve determined South Carolina as a lower tax burden overall. The most noticeable difference is that gas is cheaper in South Carolina due to a much smaller gas tax. Sales taxes start lower in North Carolina compared to South Carolina, but counties and cities often add their own sales taxes on top of it. North Carolina seems to have a more promising economic future compared to South Carolina. According to Forbes magazine, it’s the number one state for new businesses. But both are rocking, with similar unemployment rates and job growth rates. Both states have identical poverty rates. The cost of living is pretty similar, too, although it’s slightly more expensive in North Carolina, especially if you move to Asheville. What the heck, Asheville? I mean, are you really that cool? Speaking of poverty, South Carolina has higher crime overall. I’m sorry, South Carolina government, about publishing that and stuff. But South Carolina gets 3 more sunny days a year compared to North Carolina. Did that make up for it? South Carolina also spends more money per student on education. But that doesn’t match up with the crime statistics. Hmmmm Let’s see. What else? Mr. Beast is from North Carolina. That’s not his real name, and no I am not related. And Fernando from the YouTube channel E Pluribus Unum is also from North Carolina. Ian is from South Carolina. And so is Tom freaking Richey. North Carolina has more college basketball teams I don’t like. So let’s wrap this up. More than any other two states I’ve compared so far, North Carolina and South Carolina have much more in common than they have differences. Both are exciting places right now as they look to continue growing thanks to all those dang Midwesterners and Northerners moving to them. But that’s what happens when you’re awesome. You attract people. Tom: Hey Tom Richey here, coming from South Carolina That's right. SOUTH Carolina, ladies and gentlemen. It seems that no matter how many times I tell people that's where I'm from the next time someone wants to verify they ask "aren't you from North Carolina?" like, almost as if my state doesn't exist. Just remember. I'm from South Carolina. Not North, and it's a state that does exist and is very significant in the history of the United States. It's always a pleasure. A shout out to Casper Petersen and all my other George Washington level patrons on Patreon. Speaking of George Washington-level patrons, I got a new one this past week. A shout out to Roux Rinner for your generous support! And thanks to Chris and Andrew, my newest patrons at the Thomas Jefferson level! If you want to donate on Patreon I’ve put a link below. Patreon is literally the reason why I don’t coach sports anymore and I have more time to make videos. That’s right folks. This is officially my second job! Woot! Thanks for watching everyone!

Contents

List of Senators

Class 2

Class 2 U.S. Senators belong to the electoral cycle that has recently been contested in 1996, 2002, 2008, and 2014. The next election will be in 2020.

C
o
n
g
r
e
s
s

Class 3

Class 3 U.S. Senators belong to the electoral cycle that has recently been contested in 1998, 2004, 2010, and 2016. The next election will be in 2022.

# Senator Party Years in office Electoral history T
e
r
m
T
e
r
m
Electoral history Years in office Party Senator #
Vacant November 21, 1789 –
November 27, 1789
North Carolina ratified the Constitution November 21, 1789 but didn't elect its senators until November 27, 1789. 1 1st 1 North Carolina ratified the Constitution November 21, 1789 but didn't elect its senators until November 27, 1789. November 21, 1789 –
November 27, 1789
Vacant
1
NC-Congress-SamuelJohnston.JPG

Samuel Johnston
Pro-
Administration
November 27, 1789 –
March 3, 1793
Elected November 27, 1789.

Lost re-election.
Elected November 27, 1789.

[Data unknown/missing.]
November 27, 1789 –
March 3, 1795
Pro-
Administration
NC-Congress-BenjaminHawkins.jpg

Benjamin Hawkins
1
2nd
2
NCG-AlexanderMartin.jpg

Alexander Martin
Anti-
Administration
March 4, 1793 –
March 3, 1799
Elected in 1792.

Lost re-election.
2 3rd Anti-
Administration
Democratic-
Republican
4th 2 Elected in 1795.

[Data unknown/missing.]
March 4, 1795 –
March 3, 1801
Democratic-
Republican
Timothy Bloodworth 2
5th
3 Jesse Franklin Democratic-
Republican
March 4, 1799 –
March 3, 1805
Elected in 1799.

Lost re-election.
3 6th
7th 3 Elected in 1800.

Resigned to return to the State Superior Court.
March 4, 1801 –
February 17, 1807[1]
Democratic-
Republican
NC-Congress-DavidStone.jpg

David Stone
3
8th
Vacant March 4, 1805 –
December 22, 1805
Montfort Stokes was elected in 1804 but refused the position. 4 9th
4
James Turner Gouverneur von North Carolina.jpg

James Turner
Democratic-
Republican
December 22, 1805 –
November 21, 1816
Elected to finish the vacant term.
  February 17, 1807[1]
March 3, 1807
Vacant
10th 4 Elected in 1806.

Retired.
March 4, 1807 –
March 3, 1813
Democratic-
Republican
Jesse Franklin 4
11th
Re-elected November 26, 1810.

Resigned due to ill health.
5 12th
13th 5 Elected in 1812.

Resigned.
March 4, 1813 –
December 24, 1814
Democratic-
Republican
NC-Congress-DavidStone.jpg

David Stone
5
  December 24, 1814 –
December 1814
Vacant
Elected to finish Stone's term.

Resigned without having qualified.
December 1814 –
December 5, 1815
Democratic-
Republican
Francis Locke Jr. 6
14th
  December 5, 1815 –
December 13, 1815
Vacant
Elected to finish Locke's term. December 13, 1815 –
November 14, 1828
Democratic-
Republican
NC-Congress-NathanielMacon.jpg

Nathaniel Macon
7
Vacant November 21, 1816 –
December 4, 1816
5
NCG-MontfortStokes.jpg

Montfort Stokes
Democratic-
Republican
December 4, 1816 –
March 3, 1823
Elected to finish Turner's term.
Elected December 4, 1816.

Lost re-election.
6 15th
16th 6 Re-elected in 1818
17th
6
JohnBranch2.jpg

John Branch
Crawford
Republican
March 4, 1823 –
March 9, 1829
Elected in 1822 7 18th Crawford
Republican
Jacksonian 19th 7 Re-elected in 1825.

Resigned.
Jacksonian
20th
  November 14, 1828 –
December 15, 1828
Vacant
Elected to finish Macon's term.

Retired.
December 15, 1828 –
March 3, 1831
Jacksonian
James Iredell.jpg
James Iredell, Jr.
8
Re-elected in 1828.

Resigned to become U.S. Secretary of the Navy.
8 21st
Vacant March 9, 1829 –
December 9, 1829
7
BedfordBrown.jpg

Bedford Brown
Jacksonian December 9, 1829 –
November 16, 1840
Elected to finish Branch's term.
22nd 8 Elected in 1830.

Resigned.
March 4, 1831 –
March 19, 1836
Jacksonian
Willie Mangum.jpg

Willie Mangum
9
23rd Anti-Jacksonian
Re-elected in 1835.

Resigned rather than disobey instructions from the N.C. General Assembly.
9 24th
  March 19, 1836 –
December 5, 1836
Vacant
Elected to finish Mangum's term. December 5, 1836 –
November 16, 1840
Jacksonian
NC-Congress-RogerStrange.jpg

Robert Strange
10
Democratic 25th 9 Elected to full term in 1836.

Resigned rather than disobey instructions from the N.C. General Assembly.
Democratic
26th
Vacant November 16, 1840 –
November 25, 1840
    November 16, 1840 –
November 25, 1840
Vacant
8
Willie Mangum.jpg

Willie Mangum
Whig November 25, 1840 –
March 3, 1853
Elected to finish Brown's term. Elected to finish Strange's term.

[Data unknown/missing.]
November 25, 1840 –
March 3, 1843
Whig
William Alexander Graham - Brady-Handy.jpg

William Alexander Graham
11
Elected in 1841 10 27th
28th 10 Elected in 1843.

Resigned rather than disobey instructions from the N.C. General Assembly.
March 4, 1843 –
July 25, 1846
Democratic
NC-Congress-WilliamHenryHaywoodJr.jpg

William H. Haywood, Jr.
12
29th
  July 25, 1846 –
November 25, 1846
Vacant
Elected to finish Haywood's term. November 25, 1846 –
March 3, 1855
Whig
GEBadger-portrait.jpg

George Badger
13
Re-elected in 1847.

Lost re-election.
11 30th
31st 11 Re-elected in 1849.

Retired.
32nd
Vacant March 4, 1853 –
December 6, 1854
Legislature failed to elect 12 33rd
9 David Reid Democratic December 6, 1854 –
March 3, 1859
Elected to finish vacant term.

Lost re-election.
34th 12 Elected in 1855.

Resigned to become U.S. District Court Judge.
March 4, 1855 –
May 5, 1858
Democratic
NC-Congress-AsaBiggs.jpg

Asa Biggs
14
35th
  May 5, 1858 –
May 7, 1858
Vacant
Appointed to continue Biggs's term. May 7, 1858 –
March 11, 1861
Democratic
Thomas Lanier Clingman - Brady-Handy.jpg

Thomas Clingman
15
Elected November 23, 1858 to finish Biggs's term.
10
Thomas Bragg 1.jpg

Thomas Bragg
Democratic March 4, 1859 –
March 6, 1861
Elected in 1858 or 1859.

Resigned and subsequently expelled for support of the Confederate States.
13 36th
37th 13 Re-elected in 1861.

Resigned and subsequently expelled for support of the Confederate States.
Civil War and Reconstruction March 11, 1861 –
July 14, 1868
Vacant
Vacant July 11, 1861 –
July 14, 1868
Civil War and Reconstruction
38th
14 39th
40th 14
11
Joseph Carter Abbott - Brady-Handy.jpg

Joseph Abbott
Republican July 14, 1868 –
March 3, 1871
Elected in 1868 to finish vacant term.

Lost renomination.
Elected in 1868 to finish vacant term.

Retired.
July 14, 1868 –
March 3, 1873
Republican
John Pool-photograph.jpeg

John Pool
16
41st
Vacant March 4, 1871 –
January 30, 1872
Legislature failed to elect 15 42nd
12
Matt Whitaker Ransom - Brady-Handy.jpg

Matt W. Ransom
Democratic January 30, 1872 –
March 3, 1895
Elected to finish vacant term.
43rd 15 Elected in 1872.

Lost re-election.
March 4, 1873 –
March 3, 1879
Democratic
Augustus Merrimon.jpg

Augustus Merrimon
17
44th
Re-elected in 1876 16 45th
46th 16 Elected in 1879 March 4, 1879 –
April 14, 1894
Democratic
Zebulon Baird Vance - Brady-Handy.jpg

Zebulon Vance
18
47th
Re-elected in 1883 17 48th
49th 17 Re-elected in 1884
50th
Re-elected in 1889.

Lost re-election.
18 51st
52nd 18 Re-elected in 1890.

Died.
53rd
  April 14, 1894 –
April 19, 1894
Vacant
Appointed to continue Vance's term.

Successor qualified.
April 19, 1894 –
January 23, 1895
Democratic
ThomasJordanJarvis.jpg

Thomas J. Jarvis
19
Elected November 7, 1894 to finish Vance's term.
Qualified January 23, 1895.
January 23, 1895 –
March 3, 1903
Republican
Jeter Connelly Pritchard.jpg

Jeter Pritchard
20
13
NC-Congress-MarionButler.jpg

Marion Butler
Populist March 4, 1895 –
March 3, 1901
Elected in 1894.

Lost re-election.
19 54th
55th 19 Re-elected January 20, 1897.[2]

Lost re-election.
56th
14
Furnifold McLendel Simmons.jpg

Furnifold M. Simmons
Democratic March 4, 1901 –
March 3, 1931
Elected January 22, 1901.[3] 20 57th
58th 20 Elected in 1903 March 4, 1903 –
December 12, 1930
Democratic
Lee salter overman.jpg

Lee S. Overman
21
59th
Re-elected January 22, 1907.[4] 21 60th
61st 21 Re-elected January 19, 1909
62nd
Re-elected January 21, 1913 22 63rd
64th 22 Re-elected in 1914
65th
Re-elected in 1918 23 66th
67th 23 Re-elected in 1920
68th
Re-elected in 1924.

Lost renomination.
24 69th
70th 24 Re-elected in 1926.

Died.
71st
Appointed to continue Overman's term.

Lost election to finish Overman's term.
December 13, 1930 –
December 4, 1932
Democratic
Cameron A. Morrison.jpg

Cameron A. Morrison
22
15
Josiah Bailey.jpg

Josiah Bailey
Democratic March 4, 1931 –
December 15, 1946
Elected in 1930 25 72nd
Elected to finish Overman's term. December 5, 1932 –
January 3, 1945
Democratic
Robert Rice Reynolds.jpg

Robert Reynolds
23
73rd 25 Elected to full term in 1932
74th
Re-elected in 1936 26 75th
76th 26 Re-elected in 1938.

Retired.
77th
Re-elected in 1942.

Died.
27 78th
79th 27 Elected in 1944 January 3, 1945 –
May 12, 1954
Democratic
Clyde Hoey.jpg

Clyde R. Hoey
24
Vacant December 15, 1946 –
December 18, 1946
16
William Bradley Umstead.jpg

William B. Umstead
Democratic December 18, 1946 –
December 30, 1948
Appointed to continue Bailey's term.

Lost election to finish Bailey's term.
80th
17
Melville Broughton.jpg

J. Melville Broughton
Democratic December 31, 1948 –
March 6, 1949
Elected to finish Bailey's term.
Elected to full term in 1948.

Died.
28 81st
Vacant March 6, 1949 –
March 29, 1949
18
Frank Porter Graham.jpg

Frank Graham
Democratic March 29, 1949 –
November 26, 1950
Appointed to continue Broughton's term.

Lost nomination to finish Broughton's term.
19
Willissmith.JPG

Willis Smith
Democratic November 27, 1950 –
June 26, 1953
Elected to finish Broughton's term.

Died.
82nd 28 Re-elected in 1950.

Died.
83rd
  May 12, 1954 –
June 5, 1954
Vacant
Appointed to continue Hoey's term.

Elected November 2, 1954 to finish Hoey's term.
June 5, 1954 –
December 31, 1974
Democratic
Sam Ervin.jpg

Sam Ervin
25
Vacant June 26, 1953 –
July 10, 1953
20
Alton Lennon.jpg

Alton A. Lennon
Democratic July 10, 1953 –
November 28, 1954
Appointed to continue Smith's term.

Lost nomination to finish Smith's term.
21
W. Kerr Scott.jpg

W. Kerr Scott
Democratic November 29, 1954 –
April 16, 1958
Elected November 2, 1954 to finish Smith's term.
Elected to full term in 1954.

Died.
29 84th
85th 29 Re-elected in 1956
Vacant April 16, 1958 –
April 19, 1958
22
B. Everett Jordan.jpg

B. Everett Jordan
Democratic April 19, 1958 –
January 3, 1973
Appointed to continue Scott's term.

Elected November 4, 1958 to finish Scott's term.
86th
Re-elected in 1960 30 87th
88th 30 Re-elected in 1962
89th
Re-elected in 1966.

Lost renomination.
31 90th
91st 31 Re-elected in 1968.

Retired and resigned early.
92nd
23
JesseHelms.jpg

Jesse Helms
Republican January 3, 1973 –
January 3, 2003
Elected in 1972 32 93rd
  December 31, 1974 –
January 3, 1975
Vacant
94th 32 Elected in 1974.

Lost re-election.
January 3, 1975 –
January 3, 1981
Democratic
Robert Burren Morgan.jpg

Robert B. Morgan
26
95th
Re-elected in 1978 33 96th
97th 33 Elected in 1980.

Died.
January 3, 1981 –
June 29, 1986
Republican
John Porter East.jpg

John P. East
27
98th
Re-elected in 1984 34 99th
  June 29, 1986 –
July 14, 1986
Vacant
Appointed to continue East's term.

Lost election to finish East's term.
July 14, 1986 –
November 4, 1986
Republican
James Broyhill.jpg

James T. Broyhill
28
Elected to finish East's term. November 5, 1986 –
January 3, 1993
Democratic
Terry Sanford.jpg

Terry Sanford
29
100th 34 Elected to full term in 1986.

Lost re-election.
101st
Re-elected in 1990 35 102nd
103rd 35 Elected in 1992.

Lost re-election.
January 3, 1993 –
January 3, 1999
Republican
Lauch Faircloth.jpg

Lauch Faircloth
30
104th
Re-elected in 1996.

Retired.
36 105th
106th 36 Elected in 1998.

Retired to run for U.S. President.
January 3, 1999 –
January 3, 2005
Democratic
John Edwards, official Senate photo portrait.jpg

John Edwards
31
107th
24
Elizabeth Dole official photo.jpg

Elizabeth Dole
Republican January 3, 2003 –
January 3, 2009
Elected in 2002.

Lost re-election.
37 108th
109th 37 Elected in 2004 January 3, 2005 –
Present
Republican
Richard Burr official portrait crop.jpg

Richard Burr
32
110th
25
Kay Hagan official photo.jpg

Kay Hagan
Democratic January 3, 2009 –
January 3, 2015
Elected in 2008.

Lost re-election.
38 111th
112th 38 Re-elected in 2010
113th
26
Senator Thom Tillis Official Portrait.jpg

Thom Tillis
Republican January 3, 2015 –
Present
Elected in 2014 39 114th
115th 39 Re-elected in 2016.
116th
To be decided in the 2020 election. 40 117th
118th 40 To be decided in the 2022 election.
# Senator Party Years in office Electoral history T
e
r
m
  T
e
r
m
Electoral history Years in office Party Senator #
Class 2 Class 3

Living former senators

As of January 2019, there are five living former senators. The most recent senator to die was Robert Burren Morgan (served 1975–1981) on July 16, 2016. The most recently serving Senator to die was Jesse Helms (served 1973–2003) on July 4, 2008.

Senator Years in office Date of birth (and age)
Jim Broyhill July 14, 1986 – November 4, 1986 (1927-08-19) August 19, 1927 (age 91)
Lauch Faircloth January 3, 1993 – January 3, 1999 (1928-01-14) January 14, 1928 (age 91)
John Edwards January 3, 1999 – January 3, 2005 (1953-06-10) June 10, 1953 (age 66)
Elizabeth Dole January 3, 2003 – January 3, 2009 (1936-07-29) July 29, 1936 (age 82)
Kay Hagan January 3, 2009 – January 3, 2015 (1953-05-26) May 26, 1953 (age 66)

References

  1. ^ a b This date is approximate. Stone's resignation letter was read on February 17, but it could have been delivered on as early as February 11, 1807, according to the Annals of Congress (pages 66 to 68).
  2. ^ "PRITCHARD IN PRITCHARD IN NORTH CAROLINA". The New York Times. January 21, 1897. p. 2.
  3. ^ "North Carolina Elects a Democrat". The New York Times. January 23, 1901. p. 5.
  4. ^ The Tribune Almanac and Political Register 1908. New York: The Tribune Association. 1908. p. 259.

See also

This page was last edited on 17 June 2019, at 22:47
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