To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
Languages
Recent
Show all languages
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

List of United States Representatives from Rhode Island

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The following is an alphabetical list of members of the United States House of Representatives from the state of Rhode Island. For chronological tables of members of both houses of the United States Congress from the state (through the present day), see United States Congressional Delegations from Rhode Island. The list of names should be complete, but other data may be incomplete.


YouTube Encyclopedic

  • 1/2
    Views:
    2 510 734
    4 627 924
  • ✪ Do You Understand the Electoral College?
  • ✪ Is the United States a Country?

Transcription

I want to talk you about the Electoral College and why it matters. Alright, I know this doesn't sound the like most sensational topic of the day, but, stay with me because, I promise you, it's one of the most important. To explain why requires a very brief civics review. The President and Vice President of the United States are not chosen by a nationwide, popular vote of the American people; rather, they are chosen by 538 electors. This process is spelled out in the United States Constitution. Why didn't the Founders just make it easy, and let the Presidential candidate with the most votes claim victory? Why did they create, and why do we continue to need, this Electoral College? The answer is critical to understanding not only the Electoral College, but also America. The Founders had no intention of creating a pure majority-rule democracy. They knew from careful study of history what most have forgotten today, or never learned: pure democracies do not work. They implode. Democracy has been colorfully described as two wolves and a lamb voting on what's for dinner. In a pure democracy, bare majorities can easily tyrannize the rest of a country. The Founders wanted to avoid this at all costs. This is why we have three branches of government -- Executive, Legislative and Judicial. It's why each state has two Senators no matter what its population, but also different numbers of Representatives based entirely on population. It's why it takes a supermajority in Congress and three-quarters of the states to change the Constitution. And, it's why we have the Electoral College. Here's how the Electoral College works. The Presidential election happens in two phases. The first phase is purely democratic. We hold 51 popular elections every presidential election year: one in each state and one in D.C. On Election Day in 2012, you may have thought you were voting for Barack Obama or Mitt Romney, but you were really voting for a slate of presidential electors. In Rhode Island, for example, if you voted for Barack Obama, you voted for the state's four Democratic electors; if you voted for Mitt Romney you were really voting for the state's four Republican electors. Part Two of the election is held in December. And it is this December election among the states' 538 electors, not the November election, which officially determines the identity of the next President. At least 270 votes are needed to win. Why is this so important? Because the system encourages coalition-building and national campaigning. In order to win, a candidate must have the support of many different types of voters, from various parts of the country. Winning only the South or the Midwest is not good enough. You cannot win 270 electoral votes if only one part of the country is supporting you. But if winning were only about getting the most votes, a candidate might concentrate all of his efforts in the biggest cities or the biggest states. Why would that candidate care about what people in West Virginia or Iowa or Montana think? But, you might ask, isn't the election really only about the so-called swing states? Actually, no. If nothing else, safe and swing states are constantly changing. California voted safely Republican as recently as 1988. Texas used to vote Democrat. Neither New Hampshire nor Virginia used to be swing states. Most people think that George W. Bush won the 2000 election because of Florida. Well, sort of. But he really won the election because he managed to flip one state which the Democrats thought was safe: West Virginia. Its 4 electoral votes turned out to be decisive. No political party can ignore any state for too long without suffering the consequences. Every state, and therefore every voter in every state, is important. The Electoral College also makes it harder to steal elections. Votes must be stolen in the right state in order to change the outcome of the Electoral College. With so many swing states, this is hard to predict and hard to do. But without the Electoral College, any vote stolen in any precinct in the country could affect the national outcome -- even if that vote was easily stolen in the bluest California precinct or the reddest Texas one. The Electoral College is an ingenious method of selecting a President for a great, diverse republic such as our own -- it protects against the tyranny of the majority, encourages coalition building and discourages voter fraud. Our Founders were proud of it! We can be too. I'm Tara Ross for Prager University.

Contents

Current representatives

List of representatives

Representative Years Party District Notes
Nelson W. Aldrich March 4, 1879 – October 4, 1881 Republican 1st Resigned after being appointed to the US Senate
Richard S. Aldrich March 4, 1923 – March 4, 1933 Republican 2nd
Lemuel H. Arnold March 4, 1845 – March 4, 1847 Whig 2nd
Warren O. Arnold March 4, 1887 – March 4, 1891 Republican 2nd
March 4, 1895 – March 4, 1897
Latimer W. Ballou March 4, 1875 – March 4, 1881 Republican 2nd
Edward Beard January 3, 1975 – January 3, 1981 Democratic 2nd
John L. Boss, Jr. March 4, 1815 – March 4, 1819 Federalist At-large
Benjamin Bourne August 31, 1790 – March 4, 1795 Pro-Administration At-large
March 4, 1795 – ??, 1796 Federalist
William D. Brayton March 4, 1857 – March 4, 1861 Republican 2nd
John Brown March 4, 1799 – March 4, 1801 Federalist At-large
George H. Browne March 4, 1861 – March 4, 1863 Unionist 2nd
Melville Bull March 4, 1895 – March 4, 1903 Republican 1st
Clark Burdick March 4, 1919 – March 4, 1933 Republican 1st
Tristram Burges March 4, 1825 – March 4, 1829 Anti-Jacksonian At-large
March 4, 1829 – March 4, 1835 Anti-Jacksonian
Adin B. Capron March 4, 1897 – March 4, 1911 Republican 2nd
Jonathan Chace March 4, 1881 – January 26, 1885 Republican 2nd Resigned after being appointed to the US Senate
Christopher G. Champlin March 4, 1797 – March 4, 1801 Federalist At-large
David Cicilline January 3, 2011 – present Democratic 1st Incumbent
Francis B. Condon November 4, 1930 – March 4, 1933 Democratic 3rd
March 4, 1933 – January 10, 1935 1st Resigned after being seated as an Associate Justice of the RI Supreme Court
Henry Y. Cranston March 4, 1843 – March 4, 1845 Law and Order 1st
March 4, 1845 – March 4, 1847 Whig
Robert B. Cranston March 4, 1837 – March 4, 1843 Whig At-large
March 4, 1847 – March 4, 1849 1st
Thomas Davis March 4, 1853 – March 4, 1855 Democratic 1st
Nathan F. Dixon II March 4, 1849 – March 4, 1851 Whig 2nd
March 4, 1863 – March 4, 1871 Republican
Nathan F. Dixon, III February 12, 1885 - March 4, 1885 Republican 2nd
Job Durfee March 4, 1821 – March 4, 1823 Democratic-Republican At-large
March 4, 1823 – March 4, 1825 Adams-Clay Democratic-Republican
Nathan B. Durfee March 4, 1855 – March 4, 1857 Know-nothing 1st
March 4, 1857 – March 4, 1859 Republican
Benjamin T. Eames March 4, 1871 – March 4, 1879 Republican 1st
Samuel Eddy March 4, 1819 – March 4, 1823 Democratic-Republican At-large
March 4, 1823 – March 4, 1825 Adams-Clay Democratic-Republican
John E. Fogarty January 3, 1941 – January 10, 1967 Democratic 2nd Died
Aime Forand January 3, 1937 – January 3, 1939 Democratic 1st
January 3, 1941 – January 3, 1961
Peter G. Gerry March 4, 1913 – March 4, 1915 Democratic 2nd
Daniel L. D. Granger March 4, 1903 – February 14, 1909 Democratic 1st Died
Nathaniel Hazard March 4, 1819 – December 17, 1820 Democratic-Republican At-large Died
Richard Jackson, Jr. November 11, 1808 – March 4, 1815 Federalist At-large
Thomas A. Jenckes March 4, 1863 – March 4, 1871 Republican 1st
Ambrose Kennedy March 4, 1913 – March 4, 1923 Republican 3rd
Patrick Kennedy January 3, 1995 – January 3, 2011 Democratic 1st
George G. King March 4, 1849 – March 4, 1853 Whig 1st
Nehemiah Knight March 4, 1803 – June 13, 1808 Democratic-Republican At-large Died
James Langevin January 3, 2001 – present Democratic 2nd Incumbent
Oscar Lapham March 4, 1891 – March 4, 1895 Democratic 1st
Ronald Machtley January 3, 1989 – January 3, 1995 Republican 1st
Francis Malbone March 4, 1793 – March 4, 1797 Federalist At-large
James B. Mason March 4, 1815 – March 4, 1819 Federalist At-large
Louis Monast March 4, 1927 – March 4, 1929 Republican 3rd
Jeremiah E. O'Connell March 4, 1923 – March 4, 1927 Democratic 3rd
March 4, 1929 – May 9, 1930 Resigned to become Associate Justice of Rhode Island Superior Court
John M. O'Connell March 4, 1933 – January 3, 1939 Democratic 2nd
George F. O'Shaunessy March 4, 1911 – March 4, 1919 Democratic 1st
Charles H. Page February 21, 1887 - March 4, 1887 Democratic 2nd
March 4, 1891 – March 4, 1895 Seat declared vacant March 4, 1893 - April 5, 1893 due to failure of candidates to attain majority vote
Dutee J. Pearce March 4, 1825 – March 4, 1829 Anti-Jacksonian At-large
March 4, 1829 – March 4, 1833 Anti-Jacksonian
March 4, 1833 – March 4, 1837 Anti-Masonic
James M. Pendleton March 4, 1871 - March 4, 1875 Republican 2nd
William A. Pirce March 4, 1885 – January 25, 1887 Republican 2nd Seat declared vacant due to election irregularities
Elisha Potter November 15, 1796 – March 4, 1797 Federalist At-large
March 4, 1809 – March 4, 1815
Elisha R. Potter March 4, 1843 – March 4, 1845 Law and Order 2nd
Jack Reed January 3, 1991 – January 3, 1997 Democratic 2nd
Charles Risk August 6, 1935 – January 3, 1937 Republican 1st
January 3, 1939 – January 3, 1941
Christopher Robinson March 4, 1859 – March 4, 1861 Republican 1st
Fernand St. Germain January 3, 1961 – January 3, 1989 Democratic 1st
Harry Sandager January 3, 1939 – January 3, 1941 Republican 2nd
Claudine Schneider January 3, 1981 – January 3, 1991 Republican 2nd
William Sheffield March 4, 1861 – March 4, 1863 Unionist 1st
William P. Sheffield March 4, 1909 – March 4, 1911 Republican 1st
Henry J. Spooner December 5, 1881 – March 4, 1891 Republican 1st
William Sprague III March 4, 1835 – March 4, 1837 Whig At-large
Joseph Stanton, Jr. March 4, 1801 – March 4, 1807 Democratic-Republican At-large
Walter R. Stiness March 4, 1915 – March 4, 1923 Republican 2nd
Benjamin B. Thurston March 4, 1847 – March 4, 1849 Democratic 2nd
March 4, 1851 – March 4, 1855
March 4, 1855 –March 4, 1857 Know Nothing
Robert Tiernan March 28, 1967 – January 3, 1975 Democratic 2nd
Joseph L. Tillinghast March 4, 1837 – March 4, 1843 Whig At-large
Thomas Tillinghast November 13, 1797 – March 4, 1799 Federalist At-large
March 4, 1801 – March 4, 1803 Democratic-Republican
George H. Utter March 4, 1911 – November 3, 1912 Republican 2nd Died
Robert Weygand January 3, 1997 – January 3, 2001 Democratic 2nd
Isaac Wilbour March 4, 1807 – March 4, 1809 Democratic-Republican At-large

Living former Members of the U.S. House of Representatives from Rhode Island

As of October 2016, there are six former members of the U.S. House of Representatives from the U.S. State of Rhode Island who are currently living at this time. The most recent representative to die was Robert Tiernan (served 1967–1975) on October 15, 2014. The most recently serving representative to die was Fernand St. Germain (served 1961–1989) on August 16, 2014.

Representative Term of office District Date of birth (and age)
Edward Beard 1975–1981 2nd (1940-01-20) January 20, 1940 (age 79)
Claudine Schneider 1981–1991 2nd (1947-03-25) March 25, 1947 (age 72)
Ronald Machtley 1989–1995 1st (1948-07-13) July 13, 1948 (age 70)
Jack Reed 1991–1997 2nd (1949-11-12) November 12, 1949 (age 69)
Patrick J. Kennedy 1995–2011 1st (1967-07-14) July 14, 1967 (age 51)
Robert Weygand 1997–2001 2nd (1948-05-10) May 10, 1948 (age 71)

Sources

This page was last edited on 21 May 2019, at 18:32
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.