To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

List of United States Libertarian Party presidential tickets

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

This is a list of the candidates for the offices of president of the United States and vice president of the United States of the Libertarian Party. Opponents who received over one percent of the popular vote or ran an official campaign that received Electoral College votes are listed. Offices held prior to Election Day are included, and those held on Election Day have an italicized end date.

List of Libertarian presidential tickets

1972

Presidential
nominee
1972 (lost) Vice Presidential
nominee
John Hospers of CA
(1918–2011)
John Hospers 1998.jpg
Prior experience
  • Lawyer
Higher education
Prior experience
  • Radio and television producer
  • Activist
Higher education
Toni Nathan of OR
(1923–2014)
TonieNathan1993-LPConvention.jpg
Opponent(s)
Richard Nixon (Republican)
George McGovern (Democratic)
John Schmitz (American
Independent
)
Electoral vote
  • Nixon/Agnew: 520 (96.7%)[1]
  • McGovern/Shriver: 17 (3.2%)
  • Hospers/Nathan: 1 (0.2%)[1]
Popular vote
  • Nixon/Agnew: 47,168,710 (60.6%)
  • McGovern/Shriver 29,173,222 (37.5%)
  • Schmitz/Anderson: 1,100,868 (1.4%)
  • Hospers/Nathan: 3,674 (0.0%)
Opponent(s)
Spiro Agnew (Republican)
Sargent Shriver (Democratic)
Thomas Anderson (American
Independent
)

1976

Presidential
nominee
1976 (lost) Vice Presidential
nominee
Roger MacBride of VT
(1929–1995)
Roger MacBride.jpg
Prior experience
Higher education
Prior experience
Higher education
David Bergland of CA
(1935–2019)
David Bergland.jpg
Opponent(s)
Jimmy Carter (Democratic)
Gerald Ford (Republican)
Electoral vote
Electoral vote (President)
  • Carter: 297 (55.2%)
  • Ford: 240 (44.6%)[2]
  • Reagan: 1 (0.2%)
Electoral vote (Vice President)
  • Mondale: 297 (55.2%)
  • Dole: 241 (44.8%)
Popular vote
  • Carter/Mondale: 40,831,881 (50.1%)
  • Ford/Dole: 39,148,634 (48.0%)
  • MacBride/Bergland: 172,557 (0.2%)
Opponent(s)
Walter Mondale (Democratic)
Bob Dole (Republican)

1980

Presidential
nominee
1980 (lost) Vice Presidential
nominee
Ed Clark of CA
(born 1930)
Ed Clark.jpg
Prior experience
  • Lawyer
Higher education
Prior experience
  • Entrepreneur
  • Philanthropist
  • Activist
Higher education
David Koch of KS
(1940–2019)
David Koch 1980.jpg
Opponent(s)
Ronald Reagan (Republican)
Jimmy Carter (Democratic)
John B. Anderson (Independent)
Electoral vote
  • Reagan/Bush: 489 (90.9%)
  • Carter/Mondale: 49 (9.1%)
Popular vote
  • Reagan/Bush: 43,903,230 (50.8%)
  • Carter/Mondale: 35,480,115 (41.0%)
  • Anderson/Lucey: 5,719,850 (6.6%)
  • Clark/Koch: 921,128 (1.1%)
Opponent(s)
George H. W. Bush (Republican)
Walter Mondale (Democratic)
Patrick Lucey (Independent)

1984

Presidential
nominee
1984 (lost) Vice Presidential
nominee
David Bergland of CA
(1935–2019)
David Bergland.jpg
Prior experience
Higher education
Prior experience
  • Party organizer
Higher education
Jim Lewis of CT
(1933–1997)
Jim Lewis.jpg
Opponent(s)
Ronald Reagan (Republican)
Walter Mondale (Democratic)
Electoral vote
  • Reagan/Bush: 525 (97.6%)
  • Mondale/Ferraro: 13 (2.4%)
Popular vote
  • Reagan/Bush: 54,455,472 (58.8%)
  • Mondale/Ferraro: 37,577,352 (40.6%)
  • Bergland/Lewis: 228,111 (0.3%)
Opponent(s)
George H. W. Bush (Republican)
Geraldine Ferraro (Democratic)

1988

Presidential
nominee
1988 (lost) Vice Presidential
nominee
Ron Paul of TX
(born 1935)
Ron paul.jpg
Prior experience
Higher education
Prior experience
Higher education
Andre Marrou of AK
(born 1938)
Marrou-1988-Richmond.jpg
Opponent(s)
George H. W. Bush (Republican)
Michael Dukakis (Democratic)
Electoral vote (President)
  • Bush: 426 (79.2%)
  • Dukakis: 111 (20.6%)[3]
  • Bentsen: 1 (0.2%)
Electoral vote (Vice President)
  • Quayle: 426 (79.2%)
  • Bentsen: 111 (20.6%)[3]
  • Dukakis: 1 (0.2%)
Popular vote
  • Bush/Quayle: 48,886,097 (53.4%)
  • Dukakis/Bentsen: 41,809,074 (45.7%)
  • Paul/Marrou: 431,750 (0.5%)
Opponent(s)
Dan Quayle (Republican)
Lloyd Bentsen (Democratic)

1992

Presidential
nominee
1992 (lost) Vice Presidential
nominee
Andre Marrou of AK
(born 1938)
Marrou-1988-Richmond.jpg
Prior experience
Higher education
Prior experience
  • Activist
Higher education
Nancy Lord of NV
(born 1952)
Opponent(s)
Bill Clinton (Democratic)
George H. W. Bush (Republican)
Ross Perot (Independent)
Electoral vote
  • Clinton/Gore: 370 (68.8%)
  • Bush/Quayle: 168 (31.2%)
Popular vote
  • Clinton/Gore: 44,909,806 (43.0%)
  • Bush/Quayle: 39,104,550 (37.5%)
  • Perot/Stockdale: 19,743,821 (18.9%)
  • Marrou/Lord: 290,087 (0.3%)
Opponent(s)
Al Gore (Democratic)
Dan Quayle (Republican)
James Stockdale (Independent)

1996, 2000

Presidential
nominee
1996 (lost), 2000 (lost) Vice Presidential
nominee
Harry Browne of TN
(1933–2006)
Harry Browne, author.jpg
Prior experience
  • Author
Higher education
  • None
Prior experience
  • Professor
Higher education
Jo Jorgensen of SC
(born 1957)
Jo Jorgensen portrait 1 (crop 1).jpg
Prior experience
Higher education
Art Olivier of CA
(born 1957)
Art Olivier (105415391) (cropped).jpg
Opponent(s)
Bill Clinton (Democratic)
Bob Dole (Republican)
Ross Perot (Reform)
Electoral vote
  • Clinton/Gore: 379 (70.4%)
  • Dole/Kemp: 159 (29.6%)
Popular vote
  • Clinton/Gore: 47,401,185 (49.2%)
  • Dole/Kemp: 39,197,469 (40.7%)
  • Perot/Choate: 8,085,294 (8.4%)
  • Browne/Jorgensen: 485,759 (0.5%)
Opponent(s)
Al Gore (Democratic)
Jack Kemp (Republican)
Pat Choate (Reform)
Opponent(s)
George W. Bush (Republican)
Al Gore (Democratic)
Ralph Nader (Green)
Electoral vote
  • Bush/Cheney: 271 (50.4%)
  • Gore/Lieberman: 266 (49.4%)
Popular vote
  • Gore/Lieberman: 50,999,897 (48.4%)
  • Bush/Cheney: 50,456,002 (47.9%)
  • Nader/LaDuke: 2,882,955 (2.7%)
  • Browne/Olivier: 384,431 (0.4%)
Opponent(s)
Dick Cheney (Republican)
Joe Lieberman (Democratic)
Winona LaDuke (Green)

2004

Presidential
nominee
2004 (lost) Vice Presidential
nominee
Michael Badnarik of TX
(born 1954)
SI-MichaelBadnarik1.JPG
Prior experience
  • Radio show host
Higher education
Prior experience
  • Activist
Higher education
Richard Campagna of IA
(born 1960)
Richard Campagna Kareokee.png
Opponent(s)
George W. Bush (Republican)
John Kerry (Democratic)
Electoral vote
  • Bush: 286 (53.2%)
  • Kerry: 251 (46.7%)[4]
  • Edwards: 1 (0.2%)
Electoral vote (Vice President)
  • Cheney: 286 (53.2%)
  • Edwards: 252 (46.8%)
Popular vote
  • Bush/Cheney: 62,040,610 (50.7%)
  • Kerry/Edwards: 59,028,444 (48.3%)
  • Badnarik/Campagna: 397,265 (0.3%)
Opponent(s)
Dick Cheney (Republican)
John Edwards (Democratic)

2008

Presidential
nominee
2008 (lost) Vice Presidential
nominee
Bob Barr of GA
(born 1948)
Bob Barr-2008 cropped.jpg
Prior experience
Higher education
Prior experience
  • Political commentator
Higher education
Wayne Root of NV
(born 1961)
Wayne Allen Root Denver Convention 740 (2533408717).jpg
Opponent(s)
Barack Obama (Democratic)
John McCain (Republican)
Electoral vote
  • Obama/Biden: 365 (67.8%)
  • McCain/Palin: 173 (32.2%)
Popular vote
  • Obama/Biden: 69,498,516 (52.9%)
  • McCain/Palin: 59,948,323 (45.7%)
  • Barr/Root: 523,715 (0.4%)
Opponent(s)
Joe Biden (Democratic)
Sarah Palin (Republican)

2012, 2016

Presidential
nominee
2012 (lost), 2016 (lost) Vice Presidential
nominee
Gary Johnson of NM
(born 1953)
GJ Head Shot 1 (10483995115).jpg
Prior experience
Higher education
Prior experience
  • Jurist
Higher education
Jim Gray of CA
(born 1945)
Jim Gray.jpg
Prior experience
Higher education
Bill Weld of MA
(born 1945)
William Weld by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Opponent(s)
Barack Obama (Democratic)
Mitt Romney (Republican)
Electoral vote
  • Obama/Biden: 332
  • Romney/Ryan: 206
Popular vote
  • Obama/Biden: 65,915,796 (51.1%)
  • Romney/Ryan: 60,933,500 (47.2%)
  • Johnson/Gray: 1,275,971 (1.0%)
Opponent(s)
Joe Biden (Democratic)
Paul Ryan (Republican)
Opponent(s)
Donald Trump (Republican)
Hillary Clinton (Democratic)
Jill Stein (Green)
Electoral vote (President)[5]
Electoral vote (Vice President)
Popular vote
  • Clinton/Kaine: 65,853,516 (48.2%)
  • Trump/Pence: 62,984,825 (46.1%)
  • Johnson/Weld: 4,489,341 (3.3%)
  • Stein/Baraka: 1,457,216 (1.1%)
Opponent(s)
Mike Pence (Republican)
Tim Kaine (Democratic)
Ajamu Baraka (Green)

2020

Presidential
nominee
2020 (lost) Vice Presidential
nominee
Jo Jorgensen of SC
(born 1957)
Jo Jorgensen portrait 3 (cropped).jpg
Prior experience
  • Professor
Higher education
Prior experience
  • Activist
Higher education
  • None
Spike Cohen of SC
(born 1982)
Spike Cohen portrait 1 (crop 1).jpg
Opponent(s)
Joe Biden
(Democratic)

Donald Trump
(Republican)
Electoral vote[6]
  • Biden/Harris: 306 (56.9%)
  • Trump/Pence: 232 (43.1%)
  • Jorgensen/Cohen: 0
Popular vote[6]
  • Biden/Harris: 81,268,924 (51.3%)
  • Trump/Pence: 74,216,154 (46.9%)
  • Jorgensen/Cohen: 1,865,724 (1.2%)
Opponent(s)
Kamala Harris
(Democratic)

Mike Pence
(Republican)

See also

Notes

References

  1. ^ a b If not for a faithless elector, Nixon and Agnew would have won 521 (96.8%) Electoral College votes.
  2. ^ If not for a faithless elector, Ford would have won 241 (44.8%) votes.
  3. ^ a b A faithless elector swapped their votes for President and Vice President in the Electoral College, otherwise the Dukakis/Bentsen ticket would have won 112 (20.8%) votes.
  4. ^ A faithless elector voted Edwards for President and Vice President in the Electoral College, otherwise Kerry would have won 252 (46.8%) votes.
  5. ^ If not for faithless electors, Trump and Pence would have won 306 Electoral College votes each, while Clinton and Kaine would have won 232 votes.
  6. ^ a b "Official 2020 presidential general election results" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. 1 February 2021. Retrieved 6 February 2021.
This page was last edited on 11 February 2021, at 02:46
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.