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List of UK Singles Chart number ones of the 1970s

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The UK Singles Chart is the official record chart in the United Kingdom. In the 1970s, it was compiled weekly by the British Market Research Bureau (BMRB) on behalf of the British record industry with a one-week break each Christmas.[1] Prior to 1969 many music papers compiled their own sales charts but, on 15 February 1969, the BMRB was commissioned in a joint venture by the BBC and Record Retailer to compile the chart. BMRB compiled the first chart from postal returns of sales logs from 250 record shops.[2] The sampling cost approximately £52,000 and shops were randomly chosen and submitted figures for sales taken up to the close of trade on Saturday. The data was compiled on Monday and given to the BBC on Tuesday to be announced on Johnnie Walker's afternoon show and later published in Record Retailer (rebranded Music Week in 1972).[1] However, the BMRB often struggled to have the full sample of sales figures returned by post. The 1971 postal strike meant that data had to be collected by telephone but this was deemed inadequate for a national chart, and by 1973 the BMRB was using motorcycle couriers to collect sales figures.[1]

In terms of number-one singles, ABBA were the most successful group of the decade having seven singles reach the top spot. The longest duration of a single at number-one was nine weeks and this was achieved on three occasions: "Bohemian Rhapsody" by Queen in 1975; "Mull of Kintyre" / "Girls' School" by Wings in 1977 and "You're the One That I Want" by John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John in 1978. Thirteen records were released that sold over one-million copies within the decade and "Mull of Kintyre" also became the first ever single to sell over two-million copies. In doing so it became the best-ever selling single beating the benchmark set by The Beatles' song "She Loves You" in 1963.[3] "Mull of Kintyre" was also the biggest selling song of the decade and was not surpassed in physical sales until 1984 when Band Aid released "Do They Know It's Christmas?" (which also featured McCartney).[4]

In 1973, the British Phonographic Industry (BPI) was formed and they began certifying the sales of records at certain thresholds: "silver" (250,000 units), "gold" (500,000 units), and "platinum" (1,000,000 units).[5][nb 1] In 1977, the BPI held an awards ceremony at Wembley Conference Centre to mark the Silver Jubilee of Elizabeth II. The event cost £25,000, honoured music from the last 25 years and is considered to be the first BRIT Awards ceremony.[6][7]

Number-one singles

Paul McCartney with wife and Wings band member Linda. McCartney wrote the Wings song "Mull of Kintyre" which was the best selling record of the decade.
Paul McCartney with wife and Wings band member Linda. McCartney wrote the Wings song "Mull of Kintyre" which was the best selling record of the decade.
Queen, who spent nine weeks at number one with "Bohemian Rhapsody" in 1975
Queen, who spent nine weeks at number one with "Bohemian Rhapsody" in 1975
John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John, who had two number-one singles in 1978 and occupied the top spot for over a quarter of the year.
John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John, who had two number-one singles in 1978 and occupied the top spot for over a quarter of the year.
ABBA, who had 7 number-one singles in the 1970s, the most of any musical act during the decade
ABBA, who had 7 number-one singles in the 1970s, the most of any musical act during the decade
Rod Stewart, who had  5 number-one singles in the 1970s
Rod Stewart, who had 5 number-one singles in the 1970s
Former Beatles member George Harrison had the best-selling single of 1971.
Former Beatles member George Harrison had the best-selling single of 1971.
Tony Burrows, lead singer of Edison Lighthouse, who had the first new number-one single of the decade
Tony Burrows, lead singer of Edison Lighthouse, who had the first new number-one single of the decade
Pink Floyd bassist Roger Waters wrote Another Brick in the Wall, which was the last number-one single of the decade.
Pink Floyd bassist Roger Waters wrote Another Brick in the Wall, which was the last number-one single of the decade.
Key
Best-selling single of the year[8]
Best-selling single of the decade[8]
Contents
No. Artist[nb 2] Single[nb 2] Record label[nb 3] Week ending date[nb 2] Weeks at
number one[nb 2]
1970
280 Rolf Harris "Two Little Boys" Columbia 20 December 1969 6
281 Edison Lighthouse "Love Grows (Where My Rosemary Goes)" Bell 31 January 1970 5
282 Lee Marvin "Wand'rin' Star" Paramount 7 March 1970 3
283 Simon & Garfunkel "Bridge over Troubled Water" CBS 28 March 1970 3
284 Dana "All Kinds of Everything" Rex 18 April 1970 2
285 Norman Greenbaum "Spirit in the Sky" Reprise 2 May 1970 2
286 England World Cup Squad "70" "Back Home" Pye 16 May 1970 3
287 Christie "Yellow River" CBS 6 June 1970 1
288 Mungo Jerry "In the Summertime" dagger Dawn 13 June 1970 7
289 Elvis Presley "The Wonder of You" RCA 1 August 1970 6
290 Smokey Robinson and The Miracles "The Tears of a Clown" Tamla Motown 12 September 1970 1
291 Freda Payne "Band of Gold" Invictus 19 September 1970 6
292 Matthews' Southern Comfort "Woodstock" Uni 31 October 1970 3
293 Jimi Hendrix Experience "Voodoo Chile" Track 21 November 1970 1
294 Dave Edmunds "I Hear You Knocking" MAM 28 November 1970 6
1971
295 Clive Dunn "Grandad" Columbia 9 January 1971 3
296 George Harrison "My Sweet Lord" † Apple 30 January 1971 5
297 Mungo Jerry "Baby Jump" Dawn 6 March 1971 2
298 T. Rex "Hot Love" Fly 20 March 1971 6
299 Dave and Ansel Collins "Double Barrel" Techniques 1 May 1971 2
300 Tony Orlando and Dawn "Knock Three Times" Bell 15 May 1971 5
301 Middle of the Road "Chirpy Chirpy Cheep Cheep" RCA 19 June 1971 5
302 T. Rex "Get It On" Fly 24 July 1971 4
303 Diana Ross "I'm Still Waiting" Tamla Motown 21 August 1971 4
304 The Tams "Hey Girl Don't Bother Me" Probe 18 September 1971 3
305 Rod Stewart "Reason to Believe"/"Maggie May" Mercury 9 October 1971 5
306 Slade "Coz I Luv You" Polydor 13 November 1971 4
307 Benny  Hill "Ernie (The Fastest Milkman in the West)" Columbia 11 December 1971 4
1972
308 The New Seekers "I'd Like to Teach the World to Sing (In Perfect Harmony)" Polydor 8 January 1972 4
309 T. Rex "Telegram Sam" T. Rex 5 February 1972 2
310 Chicory Tip "Son of My Father" CBS 19 February 1972 3
311 Nilsson "Without You" RCA 11 March 1972 5
312 Royal Scots Dragoon Guards "Amazing Grace" † RCA 15 April 1972 5
313 T. Rex "Metal Guru" EMI 20 May 1972 4
314 Don McLean "Vincent" United Artists 17 June 1972 2
315 Slade "Take Me Bak 'Ome" Polydor 1 July 1972 1
316 Donny Osmond "Puppy Love" MGM 8 July 1972 5
317 Alice Cooper "School's Out" Warner Bros. 12 August 1972 3
318 Rod Stewart "You Wear It Well" Mercury 2 September 1972 1
319 Slade "Mama Weer All Crazee Now" Polydor 9 September 1972 3
320 David Cassidy "How Can I Be Sure" Bell 30 September 1972 2
321 Lieutenant Pigeon "Mouldy Old Dough" Decca 14 October 1972 4
322 Gilbert O'Sullivan "Clair" MAM 11 November 1972 2
323 Chuck Berry "My Ding-a-Ling" Chess 25 November 1972 4
324 Little Jimmy Osmond "Long Haired Lover from Liverpool" MGM 23 December 1972 5
1973
325 Sweet "Blockbuster" RCA 27 January 1973 5
326 Slade "Cum On Feel the Noize" Polydor 3 March 1973 4
327 Donny Osmond "The Twelfth of Never" MGM 31 March 1973 1
328 Gilbert O'Sullivan "Get Down" MAM 7 April 1973 2
329 Dawn featuring Tony Orlando "Tie a Yellow Ribbon Round the Ole Oak Tree" † Bell 21 April 1973 4
330 Wizzard "See My Baby Jive" Harvest 19 May 1973 4
331 Suzi Quatro "Can the Can" RAK 16 June 1973 1
332 10cc "Rubber Bullets" UK 23 June 1973 1
333 Slade "Skweeze Me Pleeze Me" Polydor 30 June 1973 3
334 Peters and Lee "Welcome Home" Philips 21 July 1973 1
335 Gary Glitter "I'm the Leader of the Gang (I Am!)" Bell 28 July 1973 4
336 Donny Osmond "Young Love" MGM 25 August 1973 4
337 Wizzard "Angel Fingers (A Teen Ballad)" Harvest 22 September 1973 1
338 Simon Park Orchestra "Eye Level (Theme From The Thames TV Series "Van Der Valk")" Columbia 29 September 1973 4
339 David Cassidy "Daydreamer" / "The Puppy Song" Bell 27 October 1973 3
340 Gary Glitter "I Love You Love Me Love" Bell 17 November 1973 4
341 Slade "Merry Xmas Everybody" Polydor 15 December 1973 5
1974
342 New Seekers feat. Lyn Paul "You Won't Find Another Fool Like Me" Polydor 19 January 1974 1
343 Mud "Tiger Feet" † RAK 26 January 1974 4
344 Suzi Quatro "Devil Gate Drive" RAK 23 February 1974 2
345 Alvin Stardust "Jealous Mind" Magnet 9 March 1974 1
346 Paper Lace "Billy Don't Be a Hero" Bus Stop 16 March 1974 3
347 Terry Jacks "Seasons in the Sun" Bell 6 April 1974 4
348 ABBA "Waterloo" Epic 4 May 1974 2
349 The Rubettes "Sugar Baby Love" Polydor 18 May 1974 4
350 Ray Stevens "The Streak" Janus 15 June 1974 1
351 Gary Glitter "Always Yours" Bell 22 June 1974 1
352 Charles Aznavour "She" Barclay 29 June 1974 4
353 George McCrae "Rock Your Baby" Jay Boy 27 July 1974 3
354 The Three Degrees "When Will I See You Again" Philadelphia International 17 August 1974 2
355 The Osmonds "Love Me for a Reason" MGM 31 August 1974 3
356 Carl Douglas "Kung Fu Fighting" Pye 21 September 1974 3
357 John Denver "Annie's Song" RCA 12 October 1974 1
358 Sweet Sensation "Sad Sweet Dreamer" Pye 19 October 1974 1
359 Ken Boothe "Everything I Own" Trojan 26 October 1974 3
360 David Essex "Gonna Make You a Star" CBS 16 November 1974 3
361 Barry White "You're the First, the Last, My Everything" 20th Century 7 December 1974 2
362 Mud "Lonely This Christmas" RAK 21 December 1974 4
1975
363 Status Quo "Down Down" Vertigo 18 January 1975 1
364 The Tymes "Ms Grace" RCA 25 January 1975 1
365 Pilot "January" EMI 1 February 1975 3
366 Steve Harley & Cockney Rebel "Make Me Smile (Come Up and See Me)" EMI 22 February 1975 2
367 Telly Savalas "If" MCA 8 March 1975 2
368 Bay City Rollers "Bye Bye Baby" † Bell 22 March 1975 6
369 Mud "Oh Boy" RAK 3 May 1975 2
370 Tammy Wynette "Stand by Your Man" Epic 17 May 1975 3
371 Windsor Davies and Don Estelle "Whispering Grass" EMI 7 June 1975 3
372 10cc "I'm Not in Love" UK 28 June 1975 2
373 Johnny Nash "Tears on My Pillow" CBS 12 July 1975 1
374 Bay City Rollers "Give a Little Love" Bell 19 July 1975 3
375 Typically Tropical "Barbados" Gull 9 August 1975 1
376 The Stylistics "Can't Give You Anything (But My Love)" Avco 16 August 1975 3
377 Rod Stewart "Sailing" Warner Bros. 6 September 1975 4
378 David Essex "Hold Me Close" CBS 4 October 1975 3
379 Art Garfunkel "I Only Have Eyes for You" CBS 25 October 1975 2
380 David Bowie "Space Oddity" RCA 8 November 1975 2
381 Billy Connolly "D.I.V.O.R.C.E." Polydor 22 November 1975 1
382 Queen "Bohemian Rhapsody" EMI 29 November 1975 9
1976
383 ABBA "Mamma Mia" Epic 31 January 1976 2
384 Slik "Forever and Ever" Bell 14 February 1976 1
385 The Four Seasons "December, 1963 (Oh, What a Night)" Warner Bros. 21 February 1976 2
386 Tina Charles "I Love to Love (But My Baby Loves to Dance)" CBS 6 March 1976 3
387 Brotherhood of Man "Save Your Kisses for Me" † Pye 27 March 1976 6
388 ABBA "Fernando" Epic 8 May 1976 4
389 J. J. Barrie "No Charge" Power Exchange 5 June 1976 1
390 The Wurzels "The Combine Harvester (Brand New Key)" EMI 12 June 1976 2
391 Real Thing "You to Me Are Everything" Pye 26 June 1976 3
392 Demis Roussos "Excerpts From "The Roussos Phenomenon" (EP)" Philips 17 July 1976 1
393 Elton John & Kiki Dee "Don't Go Breaking My Heart" Rocket 24 July 1976 6
394 ABBA "Dancing Queen" Epic 4 September 1976 6
395 Pussycat "Mississippi" Sonet 16 October 1976 4
396 Chicago "If You Leave Me Now" CBS 13 November 1976 3
397 Showaddywaddy "Under the Moon of Love" Bell 4 December 1976 3
398 Johnny Mathis "When a Child Is Born (Soleado)" CBS 25 December 1976 3
1977
399 David Soul "Don't Give Up on Us" Private Stock 15 January 1977 4
400 Julie Covington "Don't Cry for Me Argentina" MCA 12 February 1977 1
401 Leo Sayer "When I Need You" Chrysalis 19 February 1977 3
402 The Manhattan Transfer "Chanson D'Amour" Atlantic 12 March 1977 3
403 ABBA "Knowing Me, Knowing You" Epic 2 April 1977 5
404 Deniece Williams "Free" CBS 7 May 1977 2
405 Rod Stewart "I Don't Want to Talk About It" / "The First Cut Is the Deepest"^ Riva 21 May 1977 4
406 Kenny Rogers "Lucille" United Artists 18 June 1977 1
407 The Jacksons "Show You the Way to Go" Epic 25 June 1977 1
408 Hot Chocolate "So You Win Again" RAK 2 July 1977 3
409 Donna Summer "I Feel Love" Casablanca 23 July 1977 4
410 Brotherhood of Man "Angelo" Pye 20 August 1977 1
411 The Floaters "Float On" ABC 27 August 1977 1
412 Elvis Presley "Way Down" RCA 3 September 1977 5
413 David Soul "Silver Lady" Private Stock 8 October 1977 3
414 Baccara "Yes Sir, I Can Boogie"  RCA 29 October 1977 1
415 ABBA "The Name of the Game" Epic 4 November 1977 4
416 Wings "Mull of Kintyre" / "Girls' School" ‡ Parlophone 3 December 1977 9
1978
417 Althea & Donna "Uptown Top Ranking" Lightning 4 February 1978 1
418 Brotherhood of Man "Figaro" Pye 11 February 1978 1
419 ABBA "Take a Chance on Me" Epic 18 February 1978 3
420 Kate Bush "Wuthering Heights" EMI 11 March 1978 4
421 Brian and Michael "Matchstalk Men & Matchstalk Cats & Dogs (Lowry's Song)" Pye 8 April 1978 3
422 Bee Gees "Night Fever" RSO 29 April 1978 2
423 Boney M. "Rivers of Babylon" † Atlantic/Hansa 13 May 1978 5
424 John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John "You're the One That I Want" RSO 17 June 1978 9
425 Commodores "Three Times a Lady" Motown 19 August 1978 5
426 10cc "Dreadlock Holiday" UK 23 September 1978 1
427 John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John "Summer Nights" RSO 30 September 1978 7
428 The Boomtown Rats "Rat Trap" Ensign 18 November 1978 2
429 Rod Stewart "Da Ya Think I'm Sexy?" Riva 2 December 1978 1
430 Boney M. "Mary's Boy Child – Oh My Lord" Atlantic/Hansa 9 December 1978 4
1979
431 Village People "Y.M.C.A." Mercury 6 January 1979 3
432 Ian Dury and The Blockheads "Hit Me with Your Rhythm Stick" Stiff 27 January 1979 1
433 Blondie "Heart of Glass" Chrysalis 3 February 1979 4
434 Bee Gees "Tragedy" RSO 3 March 1979 2
435 Gloria Gaynor "I Will Survive" Polydor 17 March 1979 4
436 Art Garfunkel "Bright Eyes" † CBS 14 April 1979 6
437 Blondie "Sunday Girl" Chrysalis 26 May 1979 3
438 Anita Ward "Ring My Bell" TK 16 June 1979 2
439 Tubeway Army "Are 'Friends' Electric?" Beggars Banquet 30 June 1979 4
440 The Boomtown Rats "I Don't Like Mondays" Ensign 28 July 1979 4
441 Cliff Richard "We Don't Talk Anymore" EMI 25 August 1979 4
442 Gary Numan "Cars" Beggars Banquet 22 September 1979 1
443 The Police "Message in a Bottle" A&M 29 September 1979 3
444 The Buggles "Video Killed the Radio Star" Island 20 October 1979 1
445 Lena Martell "One Day at a Time" Pye 27 October 1979 3
446 Dr. Hook "When You're in Love with a Beautiful Woman" Capitol 17 November 1979 3
447 The Police "Walking on the Moon" A&M 8 December 1979 1
448 Pink Floyd "Another Brick in the Wall (Part II)" Harvest 15 December 1979 5
^A long debate has persisted that the Sex Pistols out-sold Sir Rod Stewart's double A-side (a budget single) in June 1977, with their anti-Monarchy anthem "God Save the Queen", during the week of Queen Elizabeth II's Silver Jubilee. On the official UK Singles Chart used by the BBC, it was placed at no. 2, and was banned by the national broadcaster and the Independent Broadcasting Authority, which regulated Independent Local Radio, as it was felt that it might cause offence.[20][21][22] In more recent years, however, the BBC have tacitly admitted that the song did indeed reach the top of the chart[23], although this has never been definitively confirmed, with the BBC and sources close to Virgin Records' owner Richard Branson both confirming and denying it as fact.
Contents

By artist

The following artists achieved three or more number-one hits during the 1970s. Swedish group, ABBA, were the most successful artist of the decade in terms of number-one singles. They had seven number-ones: "Waterloo" (1974); "Mamma Mia", "Fernando" and "Dancing Queen" (all 1976); "Knowing Me, Knowing You", "The Name of the Game" (both 1977); and "Take a Chance on Me" (1978).

Artist Number ones Weeks at
number one
ABBA 7 26
Slade 6 20
Rod Stewart 5 15
T. Rex 4 16
Donny Osmond 3 10
Mud 3 10
Gary Glitter 3 9
Brotherhood of Man 3 8
10cc 3 4

By record label

The following record labels had five or more number ones on the UK Singles Chart during the 1970s.

Record label Number ones
Bell 13
CBS 12
Polydor 11
RCA 10
Pye 9
Epic 9
EMI 8
RAK 6
MGM 5

Million-selling and platinum records

In April 1973, the British Phonographic Industry began classifying singles and albums by the number of units sold. The highest threshold is "platinum record" and was then awarded to singles that sold over 1,000,000 units.[5][nb 1] Thirteen records were classified platinum in the 1970s and two number-one songs from the 1970s were classified as platinum in the subsequent decade.[26] Slade's "Merry Xmas Everybody" subsequently sold over one-million copies but in 1985, after sales from its re-release were included.[27][28]

Two other songs originally released in the 1970s became platinum and become million selling records but both were number-ones in a subsequent decade after being re-released: "Imagine" by John Lennon charted at number six in 1975 but reached number one in 1981 following Lennon's death at the end of the previous year and Tony Christie's "(Is This The Way To) Amarillo" reached number eighteen in 1971 but later took top spot after being re-released as a charity single in 2005. Five number-ones – ABBA's "Dancing Queen", Ian Dury and The Blockheads' "Hit Me with Your Rhythm Stick", The New Seekers' "I'd Like to Teach the World to Sing (In Perfect Harmony)", Julie Covington's "Don't Cry for Me Argentina" and Pink Floyd's "Another Brick in the Wall (Part II)" – passed the million-sales mark following the introduction of music downloads in 2004.[29][30][31][32][33][34]

Artist Song Date released Date certified
platinum
Year of millionth
sale
Gary Glitter "I Love You Love Me Love" 9 November 1973 1 January 1974 1973
Brotherhood of Man "Save Your Kisses for Me" 5 March 1976 1 May 1976 1976
Queen "Bohemian Rhapsody" 31 October 1975 1 January 1976 1975
Wings "Mull of Kintyre" 11 November 1977 1 December 1977 1977
David Soul "Don't Give Up on Us" 3 December 1976 1 February 1977 1977
Boney M. "Rivers of Babylon" / "Brown Girl in the Ring" 14 April 1978 1 May 1978 1978
Boney M. "Mary's Boy Child – Oh My Lord" 24 November 1978 1 December 1978 1978
Simon Park "Eye Level" 3 November 1972 1 January 1978 1977
John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John "You're the One That I Want" 1 May 1978 1 July 1978 1978
John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John "Summer Nights" 1 September 1978 1 October 1978 1978
Village People "Y.M.C.A." 1 November 1978 1 January 1979 1979
Blondie "Heart of Glass 19 January 1979 1 February 1979 1979
Art Garfunkel "Bright Eyes" 9 January 1979 1 May 1979 1979
Pink Floyd "Another Brick in the Wall (Part II)" 23 November 1979 1 January 1980 2004–10
Slade "Merry Xmas Everybody" 7 December 1973 1 December 1980 1985
The New Seekers "I'd Like to Teach the World to Sing (In Perfect Harmony)" 11 December 1971[35] 2004–10
ABBA "Dancing Queen" 6 August 1976 2004–10
Julie Covington "Don't Cry for Me Argentina" 12 November 1976 2004–10
Ian Dury and The Blockheads "Hit Me with Your Rhythm Stick" 1 November 1978 2004–10

Songs with the most weeks at number one

The following songs spent at least six weeks at number one during the 1970s.

Artist Song Weeks at
number one
Queen "Bohemian Rhapsody" 9
Wings "Mull of Kintyre" / "Girls' School'
Olivia Newton-John and John Travolta "You're the One That I Want"
Mungo Jerry "In the Summertime" 7
Olivia Newton-John and John Travolta "Summer Nights"
Elvis Presley "The Wonder of You" 6
Freda Payne "Band of Gold"
Dave Edmunds "I Hear You Knocking
T. Rex "Hot Love"
Bay City Rollers "Bye Bye Baby"
Brotherhood of Man "Save Your Kisses for Me"
Elton John and Kiki Dee "Don't Go Breaking My Heart"
ABBA "Dancing Queen"
Art Garfunkel "Bright Eyes"

Notes

  1. ^ a b The number of sales required to qualify for platinum, gold and silver records was dropped in 1989 to the current thresholds of 200,000 units for a silver record, 400,000 units for a gold record and 600,000 units for a platinum record.[5][24][25]
  2. ^ a b c d The artist, song name, date of number one and its consecutive duration are those given by The Official Charts Company.[9][10][11][12][13][14][15][16][17][18]
  3. ^ The record labels are those given by the OCC.[19]

References

  1. ^ a b c Smith, Alan. "50s & 60s UK Charts – The Truth!". Dave McAleer's website. Archived from the original on 3 September 2011. Retrieved 4 November 2010.
  2. ^ "Key Dates in the History of the Official UK Charts". The Official Charts Company. Archived from the original on 10 January 2008. Retrieved 16 May 2010.
  3. ^ Leadbetter, Russell (17 May 2010). "Macca proves he's no sellout". The Herald. Retrieved 31 May 2010.
  4. ^ Westbrook, Caroline (14 January 2005). "The history of the chart-topper". BBC News. Retrieved 31 May 2010.
  5. ^ a b c Gallup (4 February 1989). "The Top of the Pops Chart" (PDF). Record Mirror: 4. Retrieved 16 July 2010.
  6. ^ "BRIT Awards". British Phonographic Industry. Retrieved 7 June 2010.
  7. ^ "The BRITs 1977". BRIT Awards. Retrieved 12 June 2010.
  8. ^ a b "Chart Archive – 1970s Singles". everyHit.com. Retrieved 29 July 2010.
  9. ^ "All the Number One Singles: 1970". The Official Charts Company. Archived from the original on 17 February 2011. Retrieved 13 June 2010.
  10. ^ "All the Number One Singles: 1971". The Official Charts Company. Archived from the original on 13 January 2011. Retrieved 13 June 2010.
  11. ^ "All the Number One Singles: 1972". The Official Charts Company. Archived from the original on 5 July 2010. Retrieved 13 June 2010.
  12. ^ "All the Number One Singles: 1973". The Official Charts Company. Archived from the original on 15 June 2011. Retrieved 13 June 2010.
  13. ^ "All the Number One Singles: 1974". The Official Charts Company. Archived from the original on 15 June 2011. Retrieved 13 June 2010.
  14. ^ "All the Number One Singles: 1975". The Official Charts Company. Archived from the original on 15 June 2011. Retrieved 13 June 2010.
  15. ^ "All the Number One Singles: 1976". The Official Charts Company. Archived from the original on 15 June 2011. Retrieved 13 June 2010.
  16. ^ "All the Number One Singles: 1977". The Official Charts Company. Archived from the original on 15 June 2011. Retrieved 13 June 2010.
  17. ^ "All the Number One Singles: 1978". The Official Charts Company. Archived from the original on 15 June 2011. Retrieved 13 June 2010.
  18. ^ "All the Number One Singles: 1979". The Official Charts Company. Archived from the original on 15 June 2011. Retrieved 13 June 2010.
  19. ^ "Artist Chart History". London: Official Charts Company. 2010. Archived from the original on 3 September 2011. Retrieved 6 August 2011.
  20. ^ "Bragg attacks Pistols' royal views". BBC. 27 May 2002. Retrieved 17 July 2013.
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    Customise search with the following settings – Search by: "Keyword", By Award: "Platinum", By Format: "Single" – then search by each individual year.
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Further reading

  • Davis, Sharon. Every Chart-Topper Tells a Story: The Seventies. Edinburgh: Mainstream Publishing, 1998 ISBN 1-85158-837-X, 430p.

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