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List of Suzuki engines

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

This is a list of automobile engines developed and sold by the Suzuki Motor Corporation. Suzuki is unusual in never having made a pushrod automobile engine, and in having depended on two-strokes for longer than most. Their first four-stroke engine was the SOHC F8A, which appeared in 1977. Suzuki continued to offer a two-stroke engine in an automotive application for a considerably longer time than any other Japanese manufacturer.

Straight-twins

Suzulight SF Series — 360.88 cc (22.022 cu in) air-cooled 2-stroke, 59 mm × 66 mm (2.32 in × 2.60 in) bore/stroke (downsleeved copy of Lloyd LP400 engine)

FB Series — 359 cc (21.9 cu in) 2-stroke, 61 mm × 61.5 mm (2.40 in × 2.42 in) bore/stroke. A reed valve system was introduced with the L40 version of this engine.[1]

  • Suzuki FB engine — air-cooled
  • Suzuki FE/FE2 engine — air-cooled, FF applications
  • Suzuki L50 engine — water-cooled
  • Suzuki L60 engine — water-cooled 446 cc (27.2 cu in) 2-stroke, 68 mm × 61.5 mm (2.68 in × 2.42 in) bore/stroke (export only)

FA/FC (prototype) — 360 cc (22 cu in) 2-stroke, 64 mm × 56 mm (2.52 in × 2.20 in) bore/stroke

This prototype produced 25 bhp (19 kW) at 6000 rpm. It was fitted to a rear-engined prototype (also named FC) in 1961, as part of the development work for the LC10 Fronte.

Suzuki also briefly installed Daihatsu's 547 cc (33.4 cu in) two-cylinder AB10 OHC engine in SS11 Frontes built in 1977 and '78, as an interim measure while work was progressing on their own four-stroke engine.[2]

Straight-threes

LC engine

LC10W three-cylinder engine in Fronte Coupé
LC10W three-cylinder engine in Fronte Coupé
  • Suzuki LC engine — 2-stroke
    • LC10 — 356 cc (21.7 cu in) air-cooled 52 mm × 56 mm (2.05 in × 2.20 in)
    • LC10W/LC20 — 356 cc (21.7 cu in) water-cooled
    • LC50 — 475 cc (29.0 cu in) air-cooled 60 mm × 56 mm (2.36 in × 2.20 in)
    • T4A engine — 443 cc (27.0 cu in) 2-stroke 58 mm × 56 mm (2.28 in × 2.20 in). In spite of the name change, this was simply a bored out version of the LC10W.

FB engine

  • Suzuki T5/LJ50 engine — 539 cc (32.9 cu in) 2-stroke 61 mm × 61.5 mm (2.40 in × 2.42 in). T5A engines were meant for RR applications, T5B for FF cars. The detuned engines used in the Carry and Jimny were called LJ50. Rather than being a newly developed engine, the T5 series is essentially an FB/L50 2-cylinder with a third cylinder added, its origins thus dating back to 1961.

F engine

Suzuki K10B in a 2010 Suzuki Alto
Suzuki K10B in a 2010 Suzuki Alto

C engine

  • Suzuki C engine — 2-stroke
    • C10 785 cc (47.9 cu in) 70 mm × 68 mm (2.76 in × 2.68 in)
    • C20 1,100 cc (67.1 cu in) – 80 PS (59 kW) prototype engine for intended Suzuki Fronte 1100

G engine

K engine

R engine

  • R engine
    • R06A — 658 cc (40.2 cu in) 64 mm × 68.2 mm (2.52 in × 2.69 in)

Power output: 54 PS (40 kW) and 64 PS (47 kW) for turbocharged.

    • R06D — 658 cc (40.2 cu in) 61.5 mm × 73.8 mm (2.42 in × 2.91 in)

Power output: 49 PS (36 kW)

Inline-fours

F engine

  • Suzuki F engine — 0.7–1.1 L I4
    • F6B — 0.7 L (658 cc) DOHC 16-valve 65 mm × 49.6 mm (2.56 in × 1.95 in). This shares the bore spacing of the three-cylinder F6A, although the stroke was shortened considerably to keep the displacement nearly the same.[7]
    • F8A — 0.8 L (797 cc), 62 mm × 66 mm (2.4 in × 2.6 in) SOHC - this was Suzuki's first four-stroke car engine.
    • F10A — Displacement 1.0 L; 59.2 cu in (970 cc), 65.5 mm × 72 mm (2.58 in × 2.83 in)
Indonesian market Carrys received a fuel injected engine for 2005, to enable them to meet the Euro 2 standards. This engine produces 60 PS (44 kW) at 5500 rpm and 7.8 kg⋅m (76 N⋅m) of torque at 4000 rpm.[8]
The 1.0 L; 59.2 cu in (970 cc) F10A engine as well as 0.9 L; 53.1 cu in (870 cc) 62 mm × 72 mm (2.4 in × 2.8 in), LJ462Q and 1.1 L; 64.1 cu in (1,051 cc) 65.5 mm × 78 mm (2.58 in × 3.07 in), LJ465Q versions thereof are still produced in China and see use in a wide number of vehicles.

G engine

  • Suzuki G engine — 1.0–1.8 L I4
    • G10B — 1.0 L (993 cc), 72 mm × 61 mm (2.8 in × 2.4 in) SOHC 16-valve
    • G12B — 1.2 L (1,196 cc), 71 mm × 75.5 mm (2.80 in × 2.97 in) SOHC 16-valve
    • G13A — 1.3 L (1,324 cc), 74 mm × 77 mm (2.9 in × 3.0 in) SOHC 8-valve
    • G13B or G13K — 1.3 L (1,298 cc), 74.5 mm × 74 mm (2.93 in × 2.91 in) DOHC 16-valve
    • G13BA __ 1.3 L (1,298 cc), 74.5 mm × 74 mm (2.93 in × 2.91 in) SOHC 8-valve
    • G13BB — 1.3 L (1,298 cc), 74.5 mm × 74 mm (2.93 in × 2.91 in) SOHC 16-valve
    • G15A — 1.5 L (1,493 cc), 75 mm × 84.5 mm (2.95 in × 3.33 in) SOHC 16-valve
    • G16A — 1.6 L (1,590 cc), 75 mm × 90 mm (3.0 in × 3.5 in) SOHC
    • G16B — 1.6 L (1,590 cc), 75 mm × 90 mm (3.0 in × 3.5 in) DOHC 16-valve

J engine

  • J18 — 1.8 L DOHC 16-valve FI
    • 1.8 L; 112.3 cu in (1,840 cc) [10]
    • 119 bhp (89 kW) at 6,200 rpm
    • 112 lb⋅ft (152 N⋅m) at 3,400 rpm
    • bore and stroke: 84 mm × 83 mm (3.3 in × 3.3 in)
  • J20 — 2.0 L DOHC 16-valve FI
  • J20A
    • 2.0 L; 121.7 cu in (1,995 cc)
    • Coil on plug ignition
    • approximately 143 hp (107 kW) at 5,870 rpm - minor variations in reported power 141 to 145 hp (105 to 108 kW) depending on year and market
    • 189 N⋅m (139 lbf⋅ft) of torque at 3,500 rpm
  • J20B
    • 2.0 L; 121.7 cu in (1,995 cc)
    • Coil on plug ignition
    • VVT
    • 150 hp (152 PS; 112 kW) at 6200 rpm (With manual transmission, 148 hp (150 PS; 110 kW) with CVT)
    • 190 N⋅m (140 lbf⋅ft) at 4000 rpm
  • J23 — 2.3 L (2,290 cc) DOHC 16-valve FI
    • Bore and stroke: 90 mm × 90 mm (3.5 in × 3.5 in)
    • 9.3:1 compression ratio
    • 155 hp (116 kW) at 5400 rpm
    • 152 lb⋅ft (206 N⋅m) at 3000 rpm
  • J24B — 2.4 L (2,393 cc) DOHC 16-valve
    • Bore and stroke: 92 mm × 90 mm (3.6 in × 3.5 in)
    • 166 bhp (124 kW) at 6,000 rpm
    • 167 lb⋅ft (226 N⋅m) at 3,800 rpm
    • 180 bhp (134 kW) at 6,000 rpm - 185 bhp (138 kW) at 6,500 rpm
    • 170 lb⋅ft (230 N⋅m) at 4,000 rpm

K engine

K15B
K15B
K15B-C
K15B-C

M engine

V6 engines

Diesel engines


References

  • "How-to identify YOUR car, and where to find info on it". Team Swift. Retrieved April 14, 2006.[dead link]
  • "Suzuki Engines". Brisbane, Australia: Suzi Auto Services. Archived from the original on 2009-09-11.
  1. ^ Suzuki Service Manual: Carry L40/L41/L40V (manual), Hamamatsu, Japan: Suzuki Motor Co. Ltd., p. 26
  2. ^ Ozeki, Kazuo (2007). Suzuki Story: Small Cars, Big Ambitions. Tokyo: Miki Press. pp. 66–67. ISBN 978-4-89522-503-8.
  3. ^ https://www.suzuki.co.id/automobile/karimun-wagon-r-gs
  4. ^ a b "Suzuki Global. Splash Specifications". Archived from the original on 2013-08-18. Retrieved 2014-05-26.
  5. ^ https://m.economictimes.com/k-next-engine-for-mileage-conscious-buyer-says-maruti/articleshow/30007466.cms
  6. ^ "K10C engine specs". Motorparks.uk.
  7. ^ "軽自動車用の4気筒エンジン" [Kei four-cylinder engines]. a-design-for-life (in Japanese). 2014-09-27. Archived from the original on 2019-07-08.
  8. ^ Carry 1.0i Pick-Up (brochure) (in Indonesian), P.T. Indomobil Suzuki International, 2005, p. 2
  9. ^ https://www.mobilmotorlama.com/2015/12/suzuki-karimun-kotak.html?m=1
  10. ^ Nötzli, Max, ed. (7 March 2002). Automobil Revue 2002 (in German and French). 97. Berne, Switzerland: Büchler Grafino AG. p. 551. ISBN 3-905386-02-X.
  11. ^ "J20 engine specs". media.gm. Retrieved 16 April 2014.
  12. ^ http://www.aeriostyle.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=9447
  13. ^ Nötzli, Max, ed. (7 March 2002). Automobil Revue 2002 (in German and French). 97. Berne, Switzerland: Büchler Grafino AG. p. 550. ISBN 3-905386-02-X.
  14. ^ "K14B发动机: 图片展示" [K14B engine: photo gallery] (in Chinese). China Chang'an Automobile Group. Archived from the original on 2011-09-12. Retrieved 2011-05-26.
  15. ^ http://www.suzuki.com.au/vehicles/hatch/swift-sport
  16. ^ http://www.globalsuzuki.com/automobile/lineup/ertiga/index.html
  17. ^ http://www.globalsuzuki.com/globalnews/2018/0705.html
  18. ^ https://www.globalsuzuki.com/automobile/lineup/carry/
This page was last edited on 1 January 2020, at 00:22
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