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List of Sites of Special Scientific Interest in Buckinghamshire

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Temple Island Meadows
Temple Island Meadows with the River Thames in the background

Buckinghamshire is a county in south-east England.[1] Its county town is Aylesbury,[2] and it is surrounded by Northamptonshire to the north, Bedfordshire, Hertfordshire and Greater London to the east, Surrey and Berkshire to the south, and Oxfordshire to the west.[3] Under Buckinghamshire County Council there are four districts, Aylesbury Vale, Chiltern, South Bucks and Wycombe, while Milton Keynes has a separate unitary borough council.[4] Buckinghamshire has an area of 1874 km², and a population of 739,600.[5]

In England, Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSIs) are designated by Natural England, which is responsible for protecting England's natural environment. Designation as an SSSI gives legal protection to the most important wildlife and geological sites.[6] As of April 2016, there are 65 SSSIs in this Area of Search, 55 of which have been designated for biological interest and 10 for geological interest.[7] Thirty are in the Chilterns Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, three are in National Nature Reserves, four are in Special Areas of Conservation, and seventeen are managed by the Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust.

Map all coordinates using: OpenStreetMap 
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Transcription

In 1793, noted French scientist Joseph Dombey departed Le Havre, France bound for Philadelphia. His mission was to meet with Thomas Jefferson and give him two of the rarest items on Earth. Unfortunately for Dombey, fate had other intentions and storms pushed the ship he was aboard well of course. And so it was that around the time he was supposed to deliver his precious cargo to Jefferson, he found himself instead at the mercy of British pirates. Being French in this situation wasn’t exactly ideal, so at first he attempted to pass himself off as Spanish, but his accent gave him away. Dombey was eventually taken to the small Caribbean island of Montserrat where he ultimately died before he could be ransomed. So what was the precious cargo he was to have delivered as a gift to the United States? Two small copper items (of which only six sets existed on Earth at the time)- standards representing a meter and a grave, the latter better known today as a kilogram. At the time, the United States, having already become one of the first nations in the world to adopt a decimal, base ten system for currency was strongly considering doing the same with the system of weights and measures to get rid of the hodgepodge of British weights and measures system mixed with others also commonly used throughout the young nation. Thus, with the initial strong support of then Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson, and thanks to a desire to continue to strengthen ties between France and the United States, adoption of the new French metric system seemed close at hand. Along with a trade agreement concerning grain export to France, Dombey was to deliver the meter and grave standards and attempt to argue the system’s merits to Congress who, at the time, were quite open to adopting these units of measure. Of course we all know how this turned out- Dombey never got a chance to make his arguments and thanks to concerns about whether the metric system would even stick around at all in France, combined with the fact that trade between Britain and the U.S. would be hindered by such a change, the U.S. eventually decided to abandon efforts to adopt the metric system and mostly stuck with the British system, though the U.S. Customary Units and what would become the Imperial System would soon diverge in the following decades. But as more and more nations came to adopt this new system of weights and measures, the U.S. slowly began to follow suit. Fast-forwarding to 1866 and with the Metric Act the U.S. officially sanctioned the use of the metric system “in all contracts, dealings or court proceedings” and provided each state with standard metric weights and measures. In 1875, the United States was one of just 17 nations to sign the “Treaty of the Metre” establishing, among other things, the International Bureau of Weights and Measure to govern this system. Fast forward a little under a century later and the full switch seemed inevitable in the United States after the 1968 Metric Study Act. This ended up being a three year study looking at the feasibility of switching the United States to the metric system. The result? a report titled A Metric America: “A Decision Whose Time Has Come” recommending the change and that it could be reasonably done in as little as 10 years. Unfortunately, the public was largely either apathetic or strongly opposed to making the switch. (According to a Gallup poll at the time, 45% were against it.) This was nothing new, however. A huge percentage of the time a given people of a nation have been asked by their government to switch to the International System of Units, the general public of those nations were largely against it, even France itself, who went back and forth for decades on the issue, contributing to the United States’ hesitation to adopt it in the early going. Brazil actually experienced a genuine uprising when the government forced the change in the late 19th century. Over a half century later, British citizens still stubbornly cling to many of the old measurements in their day to day lives, though have otherwise adopted SI units. So why did all these governments frequently go against the will of their people? Arguments for the economic benefits simply won out- as in so many matters of government, what businesses want, businesses often get. So the governments ignored the will of the general public and did it anyway. But in the U.S. the situation was different. Not having the pressure from being bordered and economically as bound to one’s neighbors as in Europe, and being one of the world’s foremost economic powerhouses itself, the immediately economic benefit didn’t seem so clear. For example, California alone- one of 50 states- if it were its own nation would have the 5th largest economy in the world. Texas and New York state aren’t far behind when compared to nation’s of the worlds economies at 10th and 13th respectively, let alone the other 47 states. Seeing lesser readily apparent economic benefit, and not having the same geographic pressures as in Europe, in the 1970s many big businesses and unions were in strong opposition to the change, citing the cost of making the switch and, on the latter side, unions worried that such a change would make it easier to move jobs that formerly used customary units oversees, given that now such product could more easily be purchased from abroad. Swayed, when the 1975 Metric Conversion Act was signed by President Gerald Ford, it had largely lost its teeth. While it did establish a board whose job it was to facilitate the nation’s conversion and put forth various recommendations, the act did not have an official timeline and made the switch voluntary. Nevertheless, contrary to popular belief, in the decades since, the United States actually has largely switched to the metric system, just the general public (both domestic and international) seem largely ignorant of this. The U.S. military almost exclusively uses the metric system. Since the early 1990s, the Federal government has largely been converted, and the majority of big businesses have made the switch in one form or another wherever possible. In fact, with the passage of the Metric Conversion Act of 1988, the metric system became the “preferred system of weights and measures for United States trade and commerce”. In the medical field and pharmaceuticals. the metric system is also used almost exclusively. In fact, since the Mendenhall Order of 1893, even the units of measure used by the layperson in the U.S., the yard, foot, inch, and pound, have all been officially defined by the meter and kilogram. Speaking of the general public side, nobody in the U.S. blinks an eye about food labels containing both metric and customary units (required thanks to the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act, with the majority of states since also allowing metric only). The gram is commonly used to measure everything from the amount of flour to add in a recipe to how much marijuana one buys from a shop or, where it’s still illegal, their local dealer. And if you were to ask someone to pick up a two liter of Dr. Pepper or how a person did running a 10K, most everyone in the United States would know exactly what you are talking about. Beyond this, you’d be hard pressed to find a ruler in the United States that doesn’t include both inches and centimeters and their common divisors. Further, in school, both customary units and the metric system are taught. Yes, while Americans may generally have little practical need to learn a second language, most are, at least for a time, reasonably fluent in two very different systems of measurement. As with languages unpracticed, however, once out of school, many lose their sense of the latter from lack of use and concrete perspective. It’s one thing to know what 100 and 0 degrees Celsius refers to with respect to water, it’s a whole different matter to “get” what temperature you might want to put on a jacket for. However, students who go on to more advanced science classes quickly pick up this perspective as they become more familiar and, thus, the scientists of America aren’t at the slightest disadvantage here, also contrary to what is often stated in arguments as to why the U.S. should make the switch a bit more official than it already is. All students that go along that path become just as familiar as their European brethren, if a little later in life. This all brings us around to why the United States hasn’t made the switch to the metric system more official than it already is. Primarily three reasons- cost, human psychology, and, at least on the general public side, little readily apparent practical reason to do so. As to cost, while there has never been a definitive study showing how much it would cost the United States to make the switch official and universal, general estimates range even upwards of a trillion dollars all things considered. Why so high? To begin with, we’ll discuss a relatively small example in road signs. Installing street signs is an incredibly expensive affair in many places for a variety of reasons. For instance, in 2011 the Washington State Department of Transportation claimed it costs anywhere from $30,000 to $75,000 PER SIGN, though they later clarified those were worst case and most expensive scenarios and sometimes the signs and installation can ring in ONLY around $10,000. Bronlea Mishler of the DOT explains, Installing a sign along a highway isn’t quite as simple as pounding some posts into a ground and bolting on a sign — that’s why the cost is so variable. There are two ways to replace a sign. One way allows us to install it under old rules; the second way requires us to follow new federal standards… The old rules apply if we are just fixing something, not building something new. Installing a sign alongside the road counts as fixing something — basically, just giving drivers more information. If we install a sign on the side of the road, it would cost: $2,000 to make the sign, buy the beams and rivets; $8,000 for two steel posts and concrete; $5,000 to clear brush and other landscape work before and after installation; $15,000 for maintenance crews to set up traffic cones, work vehicles, program highway signs and spend the evening doing the work. Total: $30,000…. The new rules apply if we’re doing a new construction project. Costs would be higher because we would have to bring everything up to the current highway code. These often involve putting up a sign bridge, a steel structure that spans the entire freeway to hold up multiple signs. Typical costs include: $2,600 to make the sign, buy the beams and rivets because the sign must be bigger; $75,000 for the sign bridge. Total: $77,600. WSDOT Deputy Regional Administrator Bill Vleck also stated, beyond many of these signs needing to be special ordered on a 1-off variety (think a highway sign with city name and distance marker) and often being much larger than most sign makers make, drastically increasing cost, some of the seemingly exorbitant costs are due to special features of the signs few know about. For instance, Vleck states, “If there’s an auto accident, if a car hits that sign post and there’s any kind of injury involved, the state is going to be liable, so we’re looking potentially at a multi-million dollar settlement in those kind of situations… [So] it would have to be a breakaway type sign post, and it has to be specially fabricated so that if a car hits that sign, it reacts appropriately and doesn’t come down and basically take out the occupants.” For your reference here, in 1995, it was estimated that approximately 6 million signs would need changed on federal and state roads. On top of that, it was noted that approximately just shy of 3 million of the nations about 4.2 million miles (6.8 million km) of public roads are actual local, with an uncertain number of signs in those regions that would need changed. That said, the rather obscene costs quoted by the aforementioned Washington State DOT would likely be grossly overestimated on a project such as this, with prices massively reduced if special laws were passed to remove much of the red tape, and given the extreme bulk orders that would be called for here, including for the signs themselves and contracts to dedicated crews to make this happen as fast as possible. For example, in 1995, Alabama estimated they could swap out all the signs on federal highways for a mere $70 per sign ($120 today) on average. Perhaps a better rubric would be in looking at Canada’s switch, swapping out around a quarter of a million signs on their then 300,000 miles (482,000 km) or so of road. The total reported cost? Only a little over $13 million (about $61 million today) or around $244 per sign in today’s dollars. Extrapolating that out to the minimum 6 million signs would then run approximately $1.5 billion + whatever additional signs need swapped out on the 3/4 of the rest of the roads not accounted for in that 6 million sign estimate. Not an insignificant sum, but also relatively trivial for the U.S. taxpayer to cover at about $5 per person + some uncertain amount for the local road signs that need changed. Moving on to far greater expenses- industry and wider infrastructure. While it’s impossible to accurately estimate the cost of such a change to American businesses as a whole, we do get a small glimpse of the issue when looking at a NASA report studying the feasibility of swapping the shuttle program to full metric. They determined the price tag would be a whopping $370 million for that project alone at the time, so decided it wasn’t worth the cost for little practical benefit… Now extrapolate that out to the approximately 28 million businesses in the United States, their software, their records, their labels, machinery, employee training, etc. needing switched like some sort of Y2K event on steroids. Thus, while it’s impossible to know for sure, many posit the cost could swell into the hundreds of billions of dollars, if not even creep into the trillion territory- in theory at least. At this point, even the most ardent supporter of the metric system in the United States may be rethinking whether it would be worth it to make the switch more official than it already is. But don’t fret metric supporters the world over! To begin with, the raw cost of making the switch doesn’t actually tell the whole story here. In fact, it tells a false story- while the gross total of making the change would be astronomical, it turns out the net cost likely wouldn’t be much, or anything at all. You see, beyond it noted that, for example, on average Australian businesses saw a 9-14% boost directly attributed to the switch when they made it, back in the United States when companies like IBM, GM, Ford and others spent the money to make the change, they universally found that they made a profit from doing this. This was largely from being able to reduce warehouse space, equipment needs, streamline production, lower necessary inventories, as well as taking the opportunity to, at the same time, remove inefficiencies that had crept into their respective businesses with regard to these systems. They were also able to more uniformly manage their businesses abroad and domestic to the same standards and systems. As a very small example, GM reported they were able to reduce its number of fan belts they had to manufacture and stock from about 900 sizes to 100 thanks to everything that went into the switch. In some cases the businesses also noted new international markets opening up, both in sales and ability to more easily, and often more cheaply, acquire product abroad. All of this resulted in a net profit extremely quickly from investing the money into making the switch. As you might expect from these types of benefits, an estimated 30% of businesses in the United States have largely already switched to metric. Granted, these are generally larger companies and various small businesses dealing mostly locally might not see such a benefit. However, with the increasing globalization of supply chains, many small businesses would likely still see some benefit. Unfortunately, particularly when it comes to construction, that general industry has lagged well behind others in switching, and, as you might imagine, the existing infrastructure of the nation from roads to bridges to homes to drill bits to screws to the architectural plans for all of it being based on customary units would not be cheap to change and it isn’t clear here what the net cost would be. However, as in all of this, the cost could potentially be mitigated via a slow phaseout approach with grandfathering allowed, similar to what other nations did, though in most cases on a vastly smaller scale than would be seen in the United States. All this said, we here at TodayIFoundOut would like to posit that what the international community actually finds irksome about the United States not using the metric system is not United States businesses who deal abroad or United States scientists or even the government- all of which largely use the metric system and all of which have little bearing on what Pierre sitting in his mother’s basement in France is doing at a given moment. No, what upsets Pierre is that the U.S. general populace does not use the metric system in their day to day lives. Why is this irksome? Beyond just the human drive for uniformity amongst one’s community, in this case of the global variety, because English websites the world over, keen to get some of those sweet, sweet U.S. advertising dollars, cater to the U.S. audience and use the units that said audience is more familiar with, those not familiar are often left to Google a conversion to the units they are familiar with. The alternative is for said websites to include both, but that often makes for a break in the flow of the content, something we here at TodayIFoundOut regularly wrestle with finding a proper balance with. This brings us around to the human side of the argument. To begin with, while the United States would unequivocally see many benefits to joining the rest of the world in some good old fashioned metric lovin’, as you might expect given the lack of immediately obvious benefit to the layperson, few among the American public see much point. After all, what does it really matter if a road sign is in kilometers or miles, or if one’s house is measured in square feet or square meters? While some cite the benefits of ease of conversion to other units in a given system, in day to day life, this is almost never a thing that’s cumbersome in the slightest. If it was, Americans would be clamoring to make the change. The argument that ease of conversion between units should be a primary driver for the public to want the change simply doesn’t hold water in an era where, on the extremely rare occasion people actually need to make such a precise conversion in day to day life, they have little more than to say “Hey Google”. And in most cases, even that isn’t necessary when you’re reasonably familiar with a given system. Perhaps a poignant example of how, when you’re familiar, a non base 10 system of measure really isn’t that complicated to deal with in day to day matters, consider that the world still uses 1000 milliseconds in a second, 60 seconds in a minute, 60 minutes in an hour, and 24 hours in a day. What few realize about this is that the original metric system actually attempted to simplify this as well, dividing the day into 10 hours, with 100 minutes in each hour, etc. Unfortunately, most people didn’t see the benefit in switching when also factoring in having to swap out their existing clocks. Nobody has much seen a need to fix the issue since, not even the most ardent champion of the metric system for its ease of conversions compared with imperial or customary units. And while you might still be lamenting the stubbornness of Americans for not seeing the genuine benefits to themselves that would likely be realized here, we should point out that virtually every nation in the world that uses the metric system has holdover units still relatively commonly used among laypeople that aren’t metric, for simple reasons of not seeing a reason to stop, from calories to horsepower to knots to lightyears and many more. Or how about, have you ever flown on a plane almost anywhere in the world? Congratulations, you’ve in all liklehood unwittingly been supporting the use of something other than the metric system. You see, the pilots aboard, from French to American, use a feet based, Flight Level, system for their altitude, and knots to measure their speed. Just two standards that, much like the American public and their road signs, nobody has seen much practical reason to change. Now to more concrete human psychology for not making the switch, which has gradually been converting more and more Americans from general apathy to the anti-switch crowd as the decades pass- when one group of humans tells another group what to do, occasionally using terms like “idiot units” and starting flame wars in comments of every website or video posted on the web that uses or discusses said units- you will universally get resistance if not outright hostility in response. This is not an American thing, as so often is purported- this is a human thing. Try forcing the French government to mandate by law that French is dead and English is now to be universal spoken for the sake of better international trade, economics, and relations. You might argue that in a not insignificant percentage of the world English is already the standard in such international business dealings, but that is really little different than the current situation in business in the U.S. concerning the metric system. What we’re talking about is how the general populace of France would react if the government mandated such a change, and even more so if outside nations were pressuring it. Again, it’s not an American thing- it’s a human thing. Beyond that, as anyone whose ever done anything online is well aware of- humans hate change. Loathe it. Make any change to, say, a format or style of video, no matter how small, and rest assured no matter if the change is unequivocally vastly superior and the audience universally comes to agree with that, a not insignificant number of one’s audience will complain, sometimes vehemently, at first. More directly we see this again and again throughout the history of various nations making the change to SI. Again, resistance of change is not an American thing- it’s a human thing. But fret not world. You see, slowly but surely the United States has been converting to metric and, for most practical purposes for those outside of the United States, other than having to see it on websites (which, again, we posit is the real driver of people’s ire the world over), the switch has already been made. So much so that at this stage while the cars made in America may say miles per hour on the speedometer, the makers of those cars are using metric to measure and build the things. The very military that defends American’s right to use “Freedom Units” has long since largely converted to the un-free variety. In the end, money talks, and, for much the same reason other big holdouts like the UK ultimately gave in, as American businesses who have interest in dealing internationally continue to make the switch, they are seeing to it that the metric system more and more creeps into the daily lives of Americans. This will only continue until the inevitable complete adoption. Slowly but surely America is inching towards metric, largely without anyone domestic or abroad noticing. Want to make the switch take longer? Continue calling them “idiot units”, a mildly humorous statement from a certain point of view given that it takes more brainpower to use customary units than metric, making the latter far more tailored to idiots. And continue to start flame wars in comments comprising mostly of personal attacks rather than using the many and very legitimate and rational arguments that exist as to why it would be of benefit for the people of the United States to make the switch. In the end, we all know there is no better way to convince someone to do something than making the whole thing a religious war, with you on one side and they on the other…

Key

Other classifications

Sites

Site name Photograph B G Area[a] Public
access
Location[a] Other
classifications
Map[b] Citation[c] Description
Ashridge Commons and Woods
Pitstone Common
Green tickY 640.1 hectares (1,582 acres) YES Ashridge
51°48′42″N 0°35′14″W / 51.8116°N 0.5871°W / 51.8116; -0.5871 (Ashridge Commons and Woods)
SP975135
CAONB,[8] NT[8] Map Citation This site is mainly semi-natural vegetation, with has extensive areas of woodland, grass and scrub. There are many species of breeding birds, including some which are rare nationally, such as firecrests.[8]
Aston Clinton Ragpits
Aston Clinton Ragpits
Green tickY 2.9 hectares (7.2 acres) YES Aston Clinton
51°47′20″N 0°42′50″W / 51.7888°N 0.7140°W / 51.7888; -0.7140 (Aston Clinton Ragpits)
SP888108
BBOWT,[9] CAONB[9] Map Citation This grassland site has steeply sloping old pits and spoil heaps, with a rich assembly of shrubs, herbs and invertebrates, including twenty-seven butterfly species. There is some mature woodland with beech, yew, ash and whitebeam, together with a hedge and areas of scrub.[9]
Aston Rowant
Aston Rowant
Green tickY 128.5 hectares (318 acres) YES Aston Rowant
51°40′08″N 0°56′55″W / 51.6689°N 0.9487°W / 51.6689; -0.9487 (Aston Rowant)
SU728972
CAONB,[10] NCR,[11] NNR,[10] SAC[12][13] Map Citation This site has beech woodland, scrub and chalk grassland. Unusual plants in the ground flora include wood barley, and the orchids Violet and white helleborine. There are several uncommon species of beetles and moths, and fifty breeding bird species.[14]
Aston Rowant Woods
Aston Rowant Woods
Green tickY 209.7 hectares (518 acres) YES Aston Rowant
51°40′46″N 0°55′00″W / 51.6794°N 0.9167°W / 51.6794; -0.9167 (Aston Rowant Woods)
SU750984
CAONB,[15] NCR,[16] NNR,[17] SAC[18][19] Map Citation The site is described by Natural England as "of national importance as a large, unfragmented area of ancient semi-natural woodland characteristic of the Chilterns scarp". Flora include 52 species indicative of ancient woods, and there are over 100 species of fungi.[20]
Bacombe and Coombe Hills
Bacombe Hill
Green tickY 76.4 hectares (189 acres) YES Upper Bacombe
51°45′12″N 0°46′02″W / 51.7534°N 0.7671°W / 51.7534; -0.7671 (Bacombe and Coombe Hills)
SP852068
BBOWT,[21] CAONB,[22] LNR,[23] NT[24] Map Citation The site is chalk grassland which has a rich variety of species. including the entire British population of fringed gentian, and there are areas of juniper and mixed scrub. Invertebrates include scarce species, such as chalkhill blue and brown argus butterflies.[25]
Bierton Clay Pit
Bierton Clay Pit
Green tickY 0.1 hectares (0.25 acres) NO Bierton
51°50′01″N 0°47′02″W / 51.8336°N 0.7838°W / 51.8336; -0.7838 (Bierton Clay Pit)
SP839157
GCR[26] Map Citation This disused clay pit exposes a section from the late Jurassic Kimmeridgian and Tithonian stages, between about 157 and 145 million years ago. It is the only exposure of the northern end of the Portland Beds, and shows the relationship between the Beds and the Hartwell Clay.[27]
Black Park
Black Park lake
Green tickY 15.3 hectares (38 acres) YES Wexham
51°32′51″N 0°32′26″W / 51.5476°N 0.5405°W / 51.5476; -0.5405 (Black Park)
TQ013842
LNR[28] Map Citation This site has heath, alder carr - both rare in the county - mixed and coniferous woodland and some areas of acid grassland. It has a varied fauna, and insects include the nationally rare Roesel's bush cricket. There are 18 species of butterfly, and birds including hobbies and nightjars.[29]
Bolter End Sand Pit
Bolter End Sand Pit
Green tickY 0.3 hectares (0.74 acres) NO Bolter End
51°37′13″N 0°50′50″W / 51.6203°N 0.8473°W / 51.6203; -0.8473 (Bolter End Sand Pit)
SU799919
GCR[30] Map Citation The site is part of the Reading Beds, and dates to 53 million years ago. It appears to represent riverine layers with sources from much older Lower Cretaceous and Upper Jurassic sequences.[31]
Bradenham Woods, Park Wood and The Coppice
Bradenham Woods
Green tickY 129.1 hectares (319 acres) YES Bradenham
51°40′42″N 0°48′14″W / 51.6783°N 0.8039°W / 51.6783; -0.8039 (Bradenham Woods, Park Wood and The Coppice)
SU828984
CAONB,[32] NCR,[32] NT,[33] SAC,[33] SM[34] Map Citation The site is mainly beech woodland, with a rich ground flora including rare species. Twenty-eight species of butterfly have been recorded. There are also areas of chalk grassland.[32]
Bugle Quarry Green tickY 0.1 hectares (0.25 acres) NO Hartwell
51°48′07″N 0°51′05″W / 51.8019°N 0.8514°W / 51.8019; -0.8514 (Bugle Quarry)
SP793121
GCR[35][36] Map Citation The site spans the late Jurassic, and the early Cretaceous, 152 to 139 million years ago.[35] Dinosaur teeth include those of Pelorosaurus, which are the only sauropod teeth of Tithonian (late Jurassic) age in Europe.[37]
Burnham Beeches
Burnham Beeches
Green tickY 374.6 hectares (926 acres) PP Farnham Common
51°33′44″N 0°37′51″W / 51.5622°N 0.6309°W / 51.5622; -0.6309 (Burnham Beeches)
SU950857
NNR,[38] SAC,[39] SM[40] Map Citation This site has diverse habitats, ancient oak and beech pollards, wet heath and bog, alder wood, ponds and a stream. There are dormice, 56 bird species and some very rare beetles.[41]
Buttlers Hangings
Buttlers Hangings
Green tickY 3.9 hectares (9.6 acres) YES Bradenham
51°39′31″N 0°49′13″W / 51.6587°N 0.8203°W / 51.6587; -0.8203 (Buttler's Hangings)
SU817962
CAONB[42] Map Citation The site is steeply sloping grassland and scrub which has a wide variety of plant species. There are many rabbit burrows and a badger sett. Invertebrates include colonies of chalkland butterflies and four endangered Red Book spiders.[42]
Dancersend
Dancersend
Green tickY 81.3 hectares (201 acres) YES Wendover
51°46′34″N 0°41′49″W / 51.7760°N 0.6969°W / 51.7760; -0.6969 (Dancersend)
SP900094
BBOWT,[43] CAONB,[44] FC[44] Map Citation This reserve has woodland plantations, unimproved chalk grassland and scrub. The woods have few mature trees as most were felled during the 1940s, but a rich ground flora includes plants associated with ancient woodland, such as hairy brome and wood melick.[44]
Dancersend Waterworks
Dancersend Waterworks
Green tickY 4.0 hectares (9.9 acres) NO Hastoe
51°46′21″N 0°41′18″W / 51.7724°N 0.6883°W / 51.7724; -0.6883 (Dancersend Waterworks)
SP906090
CAONB,[45] LB[46] Map Citation The site is an area of artificial banks, basins and plateaux in a chalk valley bottom, which has an unusually wide variety of herbs, grasses and shrubs. There is a badger sett and a range of butterfly and bird species.[45]
Ellesborough and Kimble Warrens
Great Kimble Warren
Green tickY 68.9 hectares (170 acres) YES Ellesborough
51°44′41″N 0°47′52″W / 51.7447°N 0.7978°W / 51.7447; -0.7978 (Ellesborough and Kimble Warrens)
SP831058
CAONB,[47] SM[48] Map Citation This is one of the most important sites in the Chilterns for natural box woodlands, and it also has grasslands with rare plant species. There is a wide range of invertebrates and breeding birds.[47][49]
Fayland Chalk Bank
Fayland Chalk Bank
Green tickY 0.6 hectares (1.5 acres) NO Parmoor
51°35′30″N 0°51′55″W / 51.5917°N 0.8653°W / 51.5917; -0.8653 (Fayland Chalk Bank)
SU787887
CAONB[50] Map Citation The site is chalk grassland which has a diverse flora. Orchids include the common spotted and pyramidal, and the profusion of chalk flowers and its south facing location make the site important for bees, grasshoppers and butterflies.[50]
Fern House Gravel Pit
Fern House Gravel Pit
Green tickY 1.3 hectares (3.2 acres) NO Bourne End
51°35′18″N 0°43′36″W / 51.5884°N 0.7268°W / 51.5884; -0.7268 (Fern House Gravel Pit)
SU883885
GCR[51] Map Citation This site may help to elucidate the history of the River Thames between glacial Anglian stage, around 450,000 years ago, when the river was diverted south to its present course, and the warm Ipswichian around 120,000 years ago. Fossils include straight-tusked elephants and mammoths.[52][53]
Finemere Wood
Finemere Wood
Green tickY 45.7 hectares (113 acres) YES Quainton
51°53′24″N 0°57′29″W / 51.8901°N 0.9581°W / 51.8901; -0.9581 (Finemere Wood)
SP718218
BBOWT[54] Map Citation Most of the site is ancient pedunculate oak forest, which has butterflies including the rare wood white and black hairstreak. There is also an area of rough grassland and scrub which is crossed by the River Ray.[55][54]
Foxcote Reservoir and Wood
Foxcote Reservoir
Green tickY 48.3 hectares (119 acres) NO Akeley
52°01′17″N 0°57′55″W / 52.0215°N 0.9653°W / 52.0215; -0.9653 (Foxcote Reservoir and Wood)
SP711364
BBOWT[56] Map Citation The reservoir is important for wintering wildfowl, especially shoveler ducks and Bewick's swans. The area around the reservoir has woodland, meadows and ponds. Plants include the greater butterfly orchid and the herb Paris quadrifolia.[57]
Frieth Meadows
Frieth Meadows
Green tickY 2.5 hectares (6.2 acres) NO Frieth
51°36′28″N 0°50′51″W / 51.6077°N 0.8476°W / 51.6077; -0.8476 (Frieth Meadows)
SU799905
Map Citation The site consists of traditionally managed and unimproved meadows on neutral to acid soils. Plants include quaking grass, green-winged orchid, lousewort and devil's bit scabious. Grassland and hedgerows have a wide range of invertebrates.[58]
Froghall Brickworks
Froghall Brickworks
Green tickY 0.7 hectares (1.7 acres) NO Chalfont St Giles
51°38′14″N 0°35′23″W / 51.6372°N 0.5896°W / 51.6372; -0.5896 (Froghall Brickworks)
SU977941
Map Citation The site is Pleistocene gravel above Reading beds. The gravel was deposited by the proto-River Thames, before it was diverted south by the Anglian Ice Age around 450,000 years ago.[59]
Frogmore Meadows
Frogmore Meadows
Green tickY 4.6 hectares (11 acres) YES Chenies
51°40′47″N 0°31′29″W / 51.6796°N 0.5247°W / 51.6796; -0.5247 (Frogmore Meadows)
TQ021989
CAONB[60] Map Citation The site has marshy areas and fens next to the river, damp grassland and drier, more acidic areas. The river bank has water voles, and damp areas are dominated by meadow foxtail and Yorkshire fog, with some marsh marigold and marsh bedstraw.[61][62]
Gomm Valley
Little Gomm's Wood
Green tickY 4.1 hectares (10 acres) YES Micklefield
51°37′17″N 0°42′21″W / 51.6215°N 0.7057°W / 51.6215; -0.7057 (Gomm Valley)
SU897922
BBOWT,[63] CAONB[64] Map Citation The site is chalk grassland which is reverting to scrub. It has a rich variety of herbs and of invertebrates, and is notable for reptiles and over-wintering birds, particularly thrushes. Over 30 species of butterflies and 180 of moths have been recorded.[65][63]
Grangelands and Pulpit Hill
Grangelands and Pulpit Hill
Green tickY 25.5 hectares (63 acres) YES Cadsden
51°44′15″N 0°48′03″W / 51.7376°N 0.8009°W / 51.7376; -0.8009 (Grangelands and Pulpit Hill)
SP829050
BBOWT,[66] CAONB,[66] NT[66] Map Citation The site has grassland and scrub, which support interesting breeding birds and invertebrates, such as glow-worms and marbled white and chalk hill blue butterflies. There are areas of mature beech woodland, with a sparse shrub layer of holly and elder.[66]
Grendon and Doddershall Woods
Grendon Wood
Green tickY 67.1 hectares (166 acres) YES Grendon Underwood
51°52′53″N 0°59′09″W / 51.8814°N 0.9859°W / 51.8814; -0.9859 (Grendon and Doddershall Woods)
SP699208
Map Citation The site is broadleaved oak woodland on north Buckinghamshire clay, with an understorey of hazel and blackthorn. Herbs include primrose and wood anemone, and small streams and wide rides provide additional habitats. The woods have 35 butterfly species, including the rare black hairstreak.[67]
Ham Home-cum-Hamgreen Woods
Ham Home Wood
Green tickY 23.2 hectares (57 acres) YES Grendon Underwood
51°51′55″N 0°59′32″W / 51.8653°N 0.9921°W / 51.8653; -0.9921 (Ham Home-cum-hamgreen Woods)
SP695190
Map Citation The site is ancient woodland on clay, with a varied structure, and a rich variety of flora and invertebrates. The site has the largest British breeding colony of the nationally rare black hairstreak butterfly.[68]
Hodgemoor Wood
Bluebells in Hodgemoor Wood
Green tickY 102.6 hectares (254 acres) YES Chalfont St Giles
51°37′55″N 0°36′10″W / 51.6320°N 0.6028°W / 51.6320; -0.6028 (Hodgemoor Wood)
SU968935
CAONB,[69] FC[69] Map Citation The site is a large area of semi-natural broad-leaved woodland on unusually varied soil types of mottled clays, sands and gravels, and trees include ancient coppiced oak, beech and hornbeam. Butterflies include white admirals, and the nationally rare jewel beetle Agrilus pannonicus has been recorded.[69]
Hollowhill and Pullingshill Woods
Hollowhill and Pullingshill Woods
Green tickY 23.0 hectares (57 acres) YES Marlow
51°34′07″N 0°48′55″W / 51.5687°N 0.8154°W / 51.5687; -0.8154 (Hollowhill and Pullingshill Woods)
SU822862
BBOWT,[70] CAONB,[71] WT[70] Map Citation A large part of the site is mature beech woodland, the result of neglected coppicing. Much of the ground below the trees is bare, but there are some unusual plants, including the nationally rare ghost orchid. There is heather in more open areas.[71]
Homefield Wood
Homefield Wood
Green tickY 6.1 hectares (15 acres) YES Hambleden
51°34′24″N 0°49′42″W / 51.5733°N 0.8283°W / 51.5733; -0.8283 (Homefield Wood)
SU813867
BBOWT,[72] CAONB,[73] FC[73] Map Citation The site has young beech plantations, with some conifers and many native trees. There are rides and glades with varied herb-rich chalk grassland, and a variety of orchids. The rich invertebrate fauna includes thirty species of butterfly and over four hundred of moth.[73][72]
Howe Park Wood
Howe Park Wood
Green tickY 21.4 hectares (53 acres) YES Tattenhoe
52°00′06″N 0°47′17″W / 52.0018°N 0.7880°W / 52.0018; -0.7880 (Howe Park Wood)
SP833344
Map Citation The site is ancient semi-natural woodland on poorly drained clay, causing seasonal waterlogging, with some areas which are drier. There is a wide variety of trees and shrubs, and almost three hundred species of moths have been recorded. Butterflies include the nationally rare black hairstreak.[74]
Ivinghoe Hills
Ivinghoe Beacon
Green tickY 212.3 hectares (525 acres) YES Ivinghoe
51°50′00″N 0°36′14″W / 51.8334°N 0.6038°W / 51.8334; -0.6038 (Ivinghoe Hills)
SP963159
CAONB,[75] NCR,[75] NT,[75] SM[75] Map Citation The site is biologically rich, and it has varied habitats including unimproved chalk grassland, which has some nationally rare species, semi-natural woodland and scrub. There are two areas of ancient woodland.[75]
Kingcup Meadows and Oldhouse Wood
Kingcup Meadows
Green tickY 13.2 hectares (33 acres) YES Denham
51°33′19″N 0°30′57″W / 51.5554°N 0.5157°W / 51.5554; -0.5157 (Kingcup Meadows and Oldhouse Wood)
TQ030851
Map Citation This is a mosaic of different habitats next to the River Alder Bourne, including unimproved pasture and woodland. The meadows have dry and wet grassland, swamp and fen. Oldhouse Wood has ash and field maple on upper slopes and oak and birch on lower ones.[76]
Kings and Bakers Woods and Heaths
Rammamere Heath
Green tickY 212.8 hectares (526 acres) YES Great Brickhill
51°57′23″N 0°39′19″W / 51.9563°N 0.6553°W / 51.9563; -0.6553 (Kings and Bakers Woods and Heaths)
NCR,[77] NNR,[78] WTBCN[79] Map Citation The site has the largest remaining area of woodland in Bedfordshire, together with lowland heath, acidic grassland and some small ponds. There are a number of rare plant species, including great woodrush, wood vetch and saw-wort.[77] There are also abundant birds and insects, including white admiral butterflies and tree pipits.[79]
Littleworth Common
Littleworth Common
Green tickY 15.8 hectares (39 acres) YES Farnham Common
51°34′01″N 0°39′09″W / 51.5669°N 0.6524°W / 51.5669; -0.6524 (Littleworth Common)
SU935862
Map Citation The site was formerly open heathland, most of which has developed into birch and oak woodland. Some remnants of acid heathland survive, and marshy areas and two large ponds have uncommon communities, including the nationally rare starfruit.[80]
Lodge Hill
Lodge Hill
Green tickY 31.8 hectares (79 acres) YES Bledlow Ridge
51°41′38″N 0°51′09″W / 51.6940°N 0.8526°W / 51.6940; -0.8526 (Lodge Hill)
SP794001
CAONB,[81] SM[82] Map Citation The site is chalk grassland and scrub which is notable for its invertebrates, including butterflies. It has a rare snail, Abide secale, and populations of badgers and slowworms.[81] There is also a Bronze Age Bowl barrow.[82]
Long Herdon Meadow
Long Herdon Meadow
Green tickY 4.5 hectares (11 acres) YES Marsh Gibbon
51°52′36″N 1°03′36″W / 51.8766°N 1.0601°W / 51.8766; -1.0601 (Long Herdon Meadow)
SP648202
BBOWT[83] Map Citation The site is a alluvial meadow next to the River Ray in the Vale of Aylesbury. It has clay soil and is liable to flooding. A regime of a hay cut followed by cattle grazing, without the use of artificial fertilisers, has resulted in a diverse grassland habitat now rare in England.[84]
Mid Colne Valley
Ranston Covert
Green tickY   132.0 hectares (326 acres) YES Denham
51°35′44″N 0°29′44″W / 51.5956°N 0.4956°W / 51.5956; -0.4956 (Mid Colne Valley)
TQ043896
Map Citation The valley has over 70 woodland and wetland breeding bird species, and 80 wintering wildfowl. It also has one of the few surviving areas of unimproved chalk grassland in Greater London, and woodland of pedunculate oak and ash.[85]
Millfield Wood
Millfield Wood
Green tickY 9.5 hectares (23 acres) YES High Wycombe
51°39′03″N 0°44′38″W / 51.6507°N 0.7439°W / 51.6507; -0.7439 (Millfield Wood)
SU870954
BBOWT,[86] CAONB[87] Map Citation this is semi-natural beech woodland on chalk, which is an unusual habitat, and it also has considerable wych elm. Its rich ground flora includes some ancient woodland and nationally restricted species, and many wild flowers, which is unusual in beech woodland.[87][86]
Moorend Common
Moorend Common
Green tickY 28.0 hectares (69 acres) YES Lane End
51°36′27″N 0°50′36″W / 51.6076°N 0.8433°W / 51.6076; -0.8433 (Moorend Common)
SU802905
CAONB[88] Map Citation The site is on London Clay, which is unusual for the Chilterns, and the soil is acid and sometimes waterlogged. Habitats are grassland, heath, woodland, marsh and scrub. Marshy areas have heath spotted orchid and bog mosses.[88]
Muswell Hill
Muswell Hill
Green tickY 0.3 hectares (0.74 acres) YES Brill
51°49′58″N 1°04′21″W / 51.8327°N 1.0726°W / 51.8327; -1.0726 (Muswell Hill)
SP640153
GCR[89] Map Citation This site has sandstones and sandy ironstones. It is problematic as their precise age and the circumstances of deposition are uncertain, but they are thought to be early Cretaceous, with late Jurassic underlying layers.[90]
Naphill Common
Naphill Common
Green tickY 71.7 hectares (177 acres) YES Naphill
51°40′02″N 0°47′12″W / 51.6673°N 0.7868°W / 51.6673; -0.7868 (Naphill Common)
SU840972
CAONB,[91] NCR[91] Map Citation This oak and beech wood has diverse trees and shrubs, areas of acid heath, wet rides and ponds. Many of the oaks and beech trees are ancient pollards. Heathland clearings have some species which are uncommon in the county, such as heath bedstraw and the heather Calluna vulgaris.[91]
Old Rectory Meadows
Old Rectory Meadows
Green tickY 7.9 hectares (20 acres) NO Denham
51°34′34″N 0°30′39″W / 51.5760°N 0.5107°W / 51.5760; -0.5107 (Old Rectory Meadows)
TQ033874
Map Citation This site on the bank of the River Misbourne has wet alluvial and water meadows, marsh and alder carr woodland. It has plants which are rare in the county such as marsh arrowgrass, and its irregular structure provides a suitable habitat for insects.[92]
Oxley Mead
Oxley Mead
Green tickY 3.7 hectares (9.1 acres) YES Milton Keynes
52°00′20″N 0°48′30″W / 52.0056°N 0.8083°W / 52.0056; -0.8083 (Oxley Mead)
SP819348
Map Citation The site is an ancient hay meadow which has a nationally rare plant community, due to its traditional management. The main plants are herbs such as great burnet and meadow sweet, and grasses include meadow foxtail and sweet vernal-grass.[93]
Pilch Fields
Pilch Fields
Green tickY 11.1 hectares (27 acres) YES Great Horwood
51°59′00″N 0°54′49″W / 51.9832°N 0.9137°W / 51.9832; -0.9137 (Pilch Fields)
SP747322
BBOWT[94] Map Citation The site has two fields called Big Pilch and Little Pilch. The varied habitats in Big Pilch include wetland, fen, scrub, a stream and ridge-and-furrow grassland. The stream continues into Little Pilch, which has spring-fed fen and grassland. Over two hundred flowering plants have been recorded.[95]
Pitstone Hill
Pitstone Hill
Green tickY 22.9 hectares (57 acres) YES Ivinghoe
51°49′16″N 0°37′23″W / 51.8211°N 0.6231°W / 51.8211; -0.6231 (Pitstone Hill)
SP950145
CAONB[96] Map Citation The site is chalk grassland on a steeply sloping hill, with small areas of woodland and scrub. Flowers include the nationally scarce pasque flower and field fleawort. Twenty-six species of butterfly have been recorded, and breeding birds include skylarks, meadow pipits and willow warblers.[96]
Pitstone Quarry
Pitstone Quarry
Green tickY 10.3 hectares (25 acres) PP Ivinghoe
51°49′13″N 0°38′52″W / 51.8204°N 0.6478°W / 51.8204; -0.6478 (Pitstone Quarry)
SP933144
Map Citation The site exposes deposits of the Middle and Late Pleistocene, during the last half-million years. Most sediments date to ice ages, but those from the latest warm period, the Ipswichian around 125,000 years ago, contains hippopotamus fossils.[97]
Poker's Pond Meadow
Poker's Pond Meadow
Green tickY 1.9 hectares (4.7 acres) NO Soulbury
51°56′37″N 0°43′21″W / 51.9436°N 0.7226°W / 51.9436; -0.7226 (Poker's Pond Meadow)
SP879280
Map Citation The site is ancient hay meadow which has been traditionally managed, and has the remains of medieval ridge and furrow ploughing. There is a marshy area, but most of the field is dry grassland, with an unusually wide variety of plants, and over 100 species of grasses, sedges, herbs and rushes have been recorded.[98]
Rodbed Wood
Rodbed Wood
Green tickY 2.2 hectares (5.4 acres) FP Medmenham
51°32′44″N 0°50′31″W / 51.5456°N 0.8420°W / 51.5456; -0.8420 (Rodbed Wood)
SU804836
CAONB[99] Map Citation The site is wet willow and alder woodland close to the River Thames, fed by a ditch from neighbouring water meadows. The understorey has blackthorn, hawthorn and guelder rose. There is a diverse flora, including the nationally rare summer snowflake. There is a rich invertebrate fauna.[99]
Rushbeds Wood and Railway Cutting
Rushbeds Wood
Green tickY 80.2 hectares (198 acres) PP Wotton Underwood
51°50′03″N 1°02′00″W / 51.8341°N 1.0334°W / 51.8341; -1.0334 (Rushbeds Wood and Railway Cutting)
SP667155
BBOWT[100] Map Citation The site is ancient woodland on heavy clay soils which are often waterlogged. The invertebrate fauna are described by Natural England as "exceptional", including over thirty butterfly species, such as the nationally rare black hairstreak and the scarce wood white and purple emperor.[101]
Shabbington Woods Complex
Bernwood Forest
Green tickY 305.6 hectares (755 acres) YES Long Crendon
51°47′39″N 1°06′35″W / 51.7943°N 1.1097°W / 51.7943; -1.1097 (Shabbington Woods Complex)
SP615110
BBOWT,[102] FC[103] Map Citation The site is the largest remnant of the former Royal Forest of Bernwood. There is a small area of ancient woodland and two unimproved meadows, bounded by mature hedges, and several ponds. The main ecological interest is the rich insect fauna, and over forty species of butterfly have been recorded, including the rare Duke of Burgundy.[103]
Sheephouse Wood
Sheephouse Wood
Green tickY 56.9 hectares (141 acres) PP Charndon
51°54′20″N 0°58′46″W / 51.9056°N 0.9795°W / 51.9056; -0.9795 (Sheephouse Wood)
SP703235
Map Citation The site has ancient pedunculate oak woodland with many small streams and diverse ground flora, typical breeding birds and some uncommon invertebrates. Invertebrates include the rare black hairstreak butterfly and ground-hopper tetrix subulata.[104]
South Lodge Pit
South Lodge Pit
Green tickY 0.5 hectares (1.2 acres) NO Taplow
51°31′44″N 0°41′46″W / 51.5290°N 0.6962°W / 51.5290; -0.6962 (South Lodge Pit)
SU905819
GCR[105] Map Citation This former chalk quarry dates to the late Cretaceous, around 83 million year ago, when sea levels were much higher, and marine fossils are found in several horizons, including annelids, oysters and bivalves. It is the only British example of a chalk phosphorite deposit, comparable to deposits in the Paris Basin.[106][107][108]
Stoke Common
Stoke Common heathland
Green tickY 83.2 hectares (206 acres) YES Stoke Poges
51°33′29″N 0°34′50″W / 51.5580°N 0.5806°W / 51.5580; -0.5806 (Stoke Common)
SU985853
Map Citation The site is a last remnant of a large heath, and is on glacial gravel over London clay, with some parts permanently waterlogged. There is a rich invertebrate fauna, especially moths, and the dusky cockroach and rare bog bush cricket have also been recorded.[109]
Stone
Stone SSSI
Green tickY 0.1 hectares (0.25 acres) NO Stone
51°48′24″N 0°52′23″W / 51.8066°N 0.8730°W / 51.8066; -0.8730 (Stone)
SP778126
GCR[110] Map Citation This site has undated sands of Lower Cretaceous Wealden deposits. The sand is of northern origin, and includes Carboniferous chert. The site is described by Natural England as important for its bearing on the palaeogeography of the Wealden.[111]
Swain's Wood
Swain's Wood
Green tickY 16.2 hectares (40 acres) NO Turville
51°37′19″N 0°56′02″W / 51.6220°N 0.9339°W / 51.6220; -0.9339 (Swain's Wood)
SU739920
BBOWT,[56] CAONB[112] Map Citation The site is in the upper slopes of a valley, with grassland and scrub, flanked by woodland on both sides. The grassland has varied plant and invertebrate species, and around 117 species of spider and over 160 of butterflies and moths have been recorded.[112]
Temple Island Meadows
Temple Island Meadows
Green tickY 14.1 hectares (35 acres) YES Henley-on-Thames
51°33′22″N 0°53′32″W / 51.5560°N 0.8922°W / 51.5560; -0.8922 (Temple Island Meadows)
SU769847
Map Citation The site is composed of several wet meadows which are grazed by sheep. They are seasonally flooded and waterlogged, and have a diverse flora and fauna. Plants include the nationally rare summer snowflake, and marsh and early marsh orchids.[113]
Tingewick Meadows
Tingewick Meadows
Green tickY 11.1 hectares (27 acres) YES Tingewick
51°58′35″N 1°03′08″W / 51.9763°N 1.0522°W / 51.9763; -1.0522 (Tingewick Meadows)
SP652313
Map Citation The meadows have areas of ancient ridge and furrow, and of marsh and ditches which are fed by springs. The grassland has a rich variety of plant species, some of which are rare in the Vale of Aylesbury, such as the quaking grass briza media and the dwarf thistle cirsium acaule.[114]
Tring Reservoirs
Tring Reservoirs
Green tickY 106.5 hectares (263 acres) YES Tring
51°48′49″N 0°40′06″W / 51.8135°N 0.6683°W / 51.8135; -0.6683 (Tring Reservoirs)
SP919136
HMWT[115] Map Citation These four reservoirs are important for birds, including nationally important numbers of wintering shovellers, and a diverse breeding community. It is also important for invertebrates such as dragonflies.[116]
Turville Hill
Turville Hill
Green tickY 22.4 hectares (55 acres) YES High Wycombe
51°36′55″N 0°53′27″W / 51.6153°N 0.8907°W / 51.6153; -0.8907 (Turville Hill)
SU769913
CAONB[117] Map Citation This is steeply sloping grazed chalk grassland with a wide variety of plants. Two butterflies are rare, the silver spotted skipper and the Adonis blue. Another scarce invertebrate is the orange clearwing moth.[117]
Warren Farm, Stewkley
Warren Farm, Stewkley
Green tickY 1.5 hectares (3.7 acres) NO Stewkley
51°54′35″N 0°45′51″W / 51.9098°N 0.7643°W / 51.9098; -0.7643 (Warren Farm, Stewkley)
SP851242
GCR[118] Map Citation This site is the most northern exposure of the Jurassic Portlandian basin, and is important for palaeographic reconstruction. It is described by Natural England as "vital to our understanding of the late Jurassic environments, stratigraphy and palaeogeography.[119]
Weston Turville Reservoir
Weston Turville Reservoir
Green tickY 18.4 hectares (45 acres) YES Weston Turville
51°46′42″N 0°45′07″W / 51.7784°N 0.7519°W / 51.7784; -0.7519 (Weston Turville Reservoir)
SP862096
BBOWT,[120] CAONB[121] Map Citation The open water is important for 46 species of over-wintering waterfowl, and the site is nationally important for shovelers. The areas around the reservoir have tall fen, reed beds and willow carr, declining habitats in Britain. There are over 300 species of beetle, of which six are rare nationally.[122]
Widdenton Park Wood
Widdenton Park Wood
Green tickY 23.5 hectares (58 acres) YES High Wycombe
51°36′59″N 0°49′17″W / 51.6164°N 0.8214°W / 51.6164; -0.8214 (Widdenton Park Wood)
SU817915
CAONB[123] Map Citation This is ancient semi-natural oak-beech woodland, which supports a varied flora including several uncommon species. The most important feature is a number of extensive spring-fed mires, dominated by willow and birch.[123]
Windsor Hill
Windsor Hill
Green tickY 61.8 hectares (153 acres) PP Princes Risborough
51°37′38″N 0°55′20″W / 51.6273°N 0.9222°W / 51.6273; -0.9222 (Windsor Hill)
SU747926
BBOWT,[56] CAONB,[124] NCR[124] Map Citation This site has beech woodland, scrub and chalk grassland. The scrub has an ancient hedge and a colony of juniper, and 23 species of butterfly have been recorded, including brown hairstreaks.[124]
Wormsley Chalk Banks
Wormsley Chalk Banks
Green tickY 14.1 hectares (35 acres) PP Turville
51°38′14″N 0°55′30″W / 51.6372°N 0.9249°W / 51.6372; -0.9249 (Wormsley Chalk Banks)
SU745937
CAONB[125] Map Citation The site has chalk grassland which is rich in both plant and invertebrate species which have sharply declined nationally. Flowers include bee and fly orchids, the latter of which is becoming scarce. Invertebrates include a variety of butterflies, harvest spiders and slowworms.[125]
Yardley Chase
Yardley Chase
Green tickY 353.1 hectares (873 acres) PP Olney
52°10′33″N 0°45′14″W / 52.1759°N 0.7540°W / 52.1759; -0.7540 (Yardley Chase)
SP853538
Map Citation This Chase has diverse semi-natural habitats, and its value for invertebrates has been enhanced by military use of the site, which has resulted in a long absence of intensive agriculture. There is woodland and unimproved grassland, and 30 breeding butterfly species have been recorded.[126]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b The area and grid reference are shown on the Natural England citation for each site.
  2. ^ The maps are provided by Natural England on the Magic Map website.
  3. ^ Citations are provided for each site by Natural England.

References

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