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List of Olympic venues in gymnastics

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Stade de Colombes hosted the gymnastics events for the 1924 Summer Olympics in Paris.
Stade de Colombes hosted the gymnastics events for the 1924 Summer Olympics in Paris.
Messuhalli hosted the gymnastics event at the 1952 Summer Olympics in Helsinki.
Messuhalli hosted the gymnastics event at the 1952 Summer Olympics in Helsinki.
The Montreal Forum hosted gymnastics events for the 1976 Summer Olympics.
The Montreal Forum hosted gymnastics events for the 1976 Summer Olympics.

For the Summer Olympics, there are 34 venues that have been or will be used for gymnastics. Before World War II, the competitions were held outdoor. Since then with the exception of 1960, gymnastics have taken place indoors.

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We’re coming to the end of the olympic games and it’s great to see teenagers like Redmond Gerard and Chloe Kim winning gold at such a young age. But when it comes to the olympics, if we forget about the glory of a medal, who is really winning? A handful of athletes make millions from sponsorship but mostly the competitors are not going to get rich, they are in it for other reasons. As for host nations, these are astonishingly expensive events, costing more than many countries annual GDP, so are they really getting a return on this investment? Let’s look at a quick breakdown of the profit and loss for an olympic games. The main costs will be creating stadiums and other venues, expanding transport infrastructure and then the extra cost of policing. The Nagano games in Japan in 1998 created a new line for their Shinkansen bullet train, connecting the olympic site to Tokyo. The London 2012 games extended lines on the Tube to allow for the olympic traffic. The UK also needed to pay $355 million to the private security firm G4S, since their police force would have been stretched to thin. The total cost can vary wildly from games to games, since it’s the infrastructure that is the big cost. Athens needed a new airport, which was a big part of the $15 billion they spent. Salt Lake City was already well equipped to host this kind of event, so they only spent $2 billion. The most expensive was the last winter olympics in Sochi, which came to over $50 billion. The profit is much harder to calculate. The sponsorship deals are huge. Tokyo 2020 already has $3 billion in sponsorship deals, with over 40 local sponsors. You can expect that number to rise, even though McDonalds pulled out of their 41 year partnership with the olympics last year. Then there is TV revenue. This year, NBC paid $963 million for the US rights to the PyeongChang games. And although viewing figures are lower than expected, the network has already sold $900 million in ad spots, so it looks like they’ll pull a profit. The global total for rights is around $4 billion and 90% of that will go to South Korea, 10% is kept by the IOC. Ticket sales and merchandising could bring in another $1 billion. The unquantifiable benefit is tourism. Sure, there will be a boost while the crowds are there, but does this convert to anything long term? This is what separates the profitable games from the non-profitable. Rio de Janeiro didn’t need a bigger public profile, it was world famous already, unlike PyeongChang or Salt Lake City. So, it hasn’t gained from a lasting boost and most of the stadiums are already being left to rot. But then, on the other side, Barcelona in 1992 put the city on the map. Those beaches that were created have become a big part of their tourist draw and the renovation along the seafront has made it into one of Europe’s best tourist destinations. More recently, the Sochi games might have come at a huge cost but it’s certainly improved tourism to the area. That’s been undermined by Russia’s international sanctions but that’s not relevant to the impact of the games. Sochi is also a host city for the soccer world cup this year, so that cut the cost of any investment needed there too. At the end of the day, for a host nation, it’s still a gamble. A lot of countries will be watching South Korea over the next couple of years as the world wonders… is the olympics a game worth playing? Who wins the most? The answer is the sponsors. The olympics give brands one of the largest audiences on earth, where they can be a part of events people will remember forever. Sporting excitement and national pride, those are powerful things to tag your name onto. This year, the interesting name is Alibaba, the Chinese retail giant, who have used this games to launch their first ever brand campaign. See the comments for Jack Ma Forrest Gump strategy. And although the price tag is high, typically $100 million for a 4 year cycle as a sponsor, they get an insane level of control over the promotion of the event. For the period around the event, they even get exclusive use of words and phrases. Rule 40 in the Olympic Charter restricts public references to Olympic competition exclusively to sponsors that have paid for it. If you think about all the search traffic that gives them control over, as well as the visibility on all the tv coverage, you see why they are spending big.

List

Games Venue Other sports hosted at venues for those games Capacity Ref.
1896 Athens Panathinaiko Stadium Athletics, Weightlifting, Wrestling 80,000 [1]
1900 Paris Vélodrome de Vincennes Cricket, Cycling, Football, and Rugby union Not listed. [2]
1904 St. Louis Francis Field Archery, Athletics, Cycling, Football, Lacrosse, Roque, Tennis, Tug of war, Weightlifting, and Wrestling 19,000. [3]
1908 London White City Stadium Archery, Athletics, Cycling (track), Diving, Field hockey, Football, Lacrosse, Rugby union, Swimming, Tug of war, Water polo (final), Wrestling 97,000. [4]
1912 Stockholm Stockholm Olympic Stadium Athletics, Equestrian, Football (final), Modern pentathlon (running), Tug of war, Wrestling 33,000. [5]
1920 Antwerp Olympisch Stadion Athletics, Equestrian, Field hockey, Football (final), Modern pentathlon, Rugby union, Tug of war, Weightlifting 12,771 [6][7][8][9][10][11][12][13][14]
1924 Paris Stade de Colombes Athletics, Cycling (road), Equestrian, Fencing, Football (final), Modern pentathlon (fencing, running), Rugby union, Tennis 22,737 [15]
1928 Amsterdam Olympic Stadium Athletics, Cycling (track), Equestrian (jumping), Football (final) 31,600 [16]
1932 Los Angeles Olympic Stadium Athletics, Equestrian (eventing, jumping), Field hockey 105,000 [17]
1936 Berlin Dietrich Eckart Open-Air Theatre None 20,000 [18]
1948 London Empress Hall, Earl's Court Boxing, Weightlifting, Wrestling 19,000 [19]
1952 Helsinki Messuhalli Basketball (final), Boxing, Weightlifting, Wrestling 5,500 [20]
1956 Melbourne West Melbourne Stadium Basketball, Boxing 7,000 [21]
1960 Rome Baths of Caracalla None 5,402 [22][23]
1964 Tokyo Tokyo Metropolitan Gymnasium None 6,500 [24][25]
1968 Mexico City National Auditorium None 12,450 [26]
1972 Munich Olympiahalle None 10.563 [27]
1976 Montreal Montreal Forum Basketball (final), Boxing (final), Handball (final), Volleyball (final) 18,000 [28]
1980 Moscow Sports Palace Judo 11,500 [29]
1984 Los Angeles Pauley Pavilion None 12,829 [30]
1988 Seoul Olympic Gymnastics Hall None 14,730 [31]
1992 Barcelona Palau dels Esports de Barcelona (rhythmic) Volleyball 8,000 [32]
Palau Sant Jordi (artistic) Handball (final), Volleyball (final) 15,000 [33]
1996 Atlanta Georgia Dome (artistic) Basketball (final), Handball (men's final) 34,500 (each side) [34][35]
University of Georgia Coliseum (rhythmic) Volleyball (indoor) 10,000 [36][37]
2000 Sydney Sydney SuperDome (artistic, trampolining) Basketball (final) 21,000 [38]
The Dome and Exhibition Complex (rhythmic) Badminton, Handball, Modern pentathlon (fencing, shooting), Volleyball (indoor) 10,000 [39]
2004 Athens Galatsi Olympic Hall (rhythmic) Table tennis Not listed. [40]
Olympic Indoor Hall (artistic, trampolining) Basketball (final) 19,250 [41]
2008 Beijing Beijing National Indoor Stadium (artistic, trampoline) Handball (final) 19,000 [42]
Beijing University of Technology Gymnasium (rhythmic) Badminton 7,500 [43]
2012 London North Greenwich Arena (renamed from The O2 Arena due to sponsorship regulations) (artistic, trampolining) Basketball (final) 20,000 [44]
Wembley Arena (rhythmic) Badminton 6,000 [45]
2016 Rio de Janeiro Rio Olympic Arena (renamed from HSBC Arena due to naming rights prohibition during the games). None 12,000 [46]
2020 Tokyo Olympic Gymnastic Centre None 12,000
2024 Paris Arena 92 (to be renamed from Paris La Défense Arena due to naming rights prohibition during the Games) None 17,000
2028 Los Angeles The Forum None 17,000

References

  1. ^ 1896 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 2. pp. 31–49. Accessed 3 October 2010.
  2. ^ 1900 Summer Olympics official report. pp. 15–16. Accessed 14 November 2010. (in French)
  3. ^ Spalding's report of the 1904 Summer Olympics. Archived 29 August 2011 at the Wayback Machine. pp. 222–9, 233–47. Accessed 4 October 2010.
  4. ^ 1908 Summer Olympics official report. pp. 32–5, 40. Accessed 5 October 2010.
  5. ^ 1912 Summer Olympics official report. pp. 168–211. Accessed 5 October 2010.
  6. ^ 1920 Summer Olympics athletics. Sports-reference.com. Retrieved on 24 January 2012.
  7. ^ 1920 Summer Olympics equestrian. Sports-reference.com. Retrieved on 24 January 2012.
  8. ^ 1920 Summer Olympics men's field hockey. Sports-reference.com. Retrieved on 24 January 2012.
  9. ^ 1920 Summer Olympics football. Sports-reference.com. Retrieved on 24 January 2012.
  10. ^ 1920 Summer Olympics gymnastics. Sports-reference.com. Retrieved on 24 January 2012.
  11. ^ 1920 Summer Olympics modern pentathlon. Sports-reference.com. Retrieved on 24 January 2012.
  12. ^ 1920 Summer Olympics rugby union. Sports-reference.com. Retrieved on 24 January 2012.
  13. ^ 1920 Summer Olympics tug of war. Sports-reference.com. Retrieved on 24 January 2012.
  14. ^ 1920 Summer Olympics weightlifting. Sports-reference.com (29 August 1920). Retrieved on 24 January 2012.
  15. ^ 1924 Olympics official report. Archived 10 April 2008 at the Wayback Machine. pp. 50–5, 96–7, 121, 152, 216, 222, 238, 248, 265, 318, 339, 375, 499, 503, 536. (in French)
  16. ^ 1928 Summer Olympics official report. Archived 8 April 2008 at the Wayback Machine. pp. 173–205.
  17. ^ 1932 Summer Olympics official report. Archived 10 April 2008 at the Wayback Machine. pp. 61–8.
  18. ^ 1936 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. pp. 141–9, 154–62. Accessed 17 October 2010.
  19. ^ 1948 Summer Olympics official report. Archived 16 July 2011 at the Wayback Machine. pp. 43, 46, 49–50. Accessed 19 October 2010.
  20. ^ 1952 Summer Olympics official report. Archived 11 April 2008 at the Wayback Machine. p. 51. Accessed 21 October 2010.
  21. ^ 1956 Summer Olympics official report. Archived 12 September 2008 at the Wayback Machine. p. 42. Accessed 25 October 2010.
  22. ^ 1960 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. pp. 76, 79. Accessed 28 October 2010.
  23. ^ 1960 Summer Olympic official report. Archived 26 February 2008 at the Wayback Machine. Volume 2. Part 1. p. 345. Accessed 28 October 2010.
  24. ^ 1964 Summer Olympics official report. Archived 7 July 2010 at the Wayback Machine. Volume 1. Part 1. p. 115. Accessed 31 October 2010.
  25. ^ 1964 Summer Olympics official report. Archived 7 July 2010 at the Wayback Machine. Volume 1. Part 1. pp. 120–1. Accessed 31 October 2010.
  26. ^ 1968 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 2. Part 1. p. 77. Accessed 4 November 2010. (in English) & (in French)
  27. ^ 1972 Summer Olympics official report. – Volume 2. Part 2. pp. 182–4. Accessed 8 November 2010.
  28. ^ 1976 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 2. pp. 138–43. Accessed 14 November 2010.
  29. ^ 1980 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 2. Part 1. pp. 58–60. Accessed 18 November 2010.
  30. ^ 1984 Summer Olympics official report. Archived 2 November 2010 at the Wayback Machine. Volume 1. Part 1. pp. 132–4. Accessed 24 November 2010.
  31. ^ 1988 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. Part 1. pp. 178–9. Accessed 1 December 2010.
  32. ^ 1992 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 2. pp. 192–5. Accessed 6 December 2010.
  33. ^ 1992 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 2. pp. 168–76. Accessed 6 December 2010.
  34. ^ 1996 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. p. 540. Accessed 9 December 2010.
  35. ^ 1996 Summer Olympics official report. Archived 27 September 2007 at the Wayback Machine. Volume 3. pp. 451, 456. Accessed 9 December 2010.
  36. ^ 1996 Summer Olympics official report. Volume 1. p. 544. Accessed 9 December 2010.
  37. ^ 1996 Summer Olympics official report. Archived 27 September 2007 at the Wayback Machine. Volume 3. p. 457. Accessed 9 December 2010.
  38. ^ 2000 Summer Olympics official report. Archived 9 November 2000 at the Wayback Machine. Volume 1. p. 390. Accessed 16 December 2010.
  39. ^ 2000 Summer Olympics official report. Archived 9 November 2000 at the Wayback Machine. Volume 1. p. 391. Accessed 16 December 2010.
  40. ^ 2004 Summer Olympics official report. Archived 19 August 2008 at the Wayback Machine. Volume 2. pp. 340, 399. Accessed 24 December 2010.
  41. ^ 2004 Summer Olympics official report. Archived 19 August 2008 at the Wayback Machine. Volume 2. pp. 273, 329, 346. Accessed 22 December 2010.
  42. ^ "National Indoor Stadium". Beijing Organizing Committee for the Games of the XXIX Olympiad. Archived from the original on 9 August 2008. Retrieved 10 August 2008.
  43. ^ "Beijing University of Technology Gymnasium". Beijing Organizing Committee for the Games of the XXIX Olympiad. Archived from the original on 9 August 2008. Retrieved 10 August 2008.
  44. ^ London2012.com profile of the North Greenwich Arena. Archived 16 January 2011 at WebCite Accessed 30 December 2010.
  45. ^ London2012.com profile of Wembley Arena. Archived 7 September 2011 at the Wayback Machine. Accessed 30 December 2010.
  46. ^ "Rio Olympic Arena", Rio de Janeiro 2016 Candidate File (PDF), 2, (BOC), 16 February 2009, pp. 58–59, archived from the original (PDF) on 23 May 2013, retrieved 2 December 2009.
This page was last edited on 17 November 2018, at 14:00
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