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List of governors of Georgia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The governor of Georgia is the head of the executive branch of Georgia's state government and the commander-in-chief of the state's military forces. The current governor is Republican Brian Kemp, who assumed office on January 14, 2019.

There have officially been 77 governors of the state of Georgia, including 11 who served more than one distinct term (John Houstoun, George Walton, Edward Telfair, George Mathews, Jared Irwin, David Brydie Mitchell, George Rockingham Gilmer, M. Hoke Smith, Joseph Mackey Brown, John M. Slaton, and Eugene Talmadge, with Herman Talmadge serving two de facto distinct terms).

The longest-serving governors are George Busbee, Joe Frank Harris, Zell Miller, Sonny Perdue, and Nathan Deal, each of whom served two full four-year terms; Joseph E. Brown, governor during the Civil War, was elected four times, serving seven and a half years. The shortest term of the post-revolutionary period is that of Matthew Talbot, who served 13 days after succeeding his predecessor who died in office. One man, Eugene Talmadge, died before taking office in his second distinct term, leading to a dispute in which three people claimed the office.

Governors

Governors of the State of Georgia[a]
No.[b] Governor Term in office Party Election Lt. Governor[c]
7
Archibald Bulloch 1.jpg
  Archibald Bulloch January 22, 1776

February 22, 1777
(died in office)
None [d] Office did not exist
8
Button Gwinnett.jpg
Button Gwinnett March 4, 1777

May 8, 1777
None [e]
9
John Adam Treutlen.jpg
John A. Treutlen May 8, 1777

January 10, 1778
None
10 John Houstoun January 10, 1778

December 29, 1778[f]
None
Vacant
Chairman of the Executive Council (Governor)
John Houstoun January 10,1778-January 7, 1779; William Glascock January 7, 1779-July 24, 1779;Seth John Cuthbert July 24, 1779-August 6, 1779
December 29, 1778

August 6, 1779
Government in
chaos after fall
of Savannah
[g]
11
John Wereat.jpg
  John Wereat August 6, 1779

November 1779[g]
None
12
George Walton (ca 1749-1804).jpg
George Walton November 1779[g]

January 4, 1780
None
13 Richard Howly January 4, 1780

February 5, 1780
(resigned)[h]
George Wells February 6, 1780

February 16, 1780
None —{ George Wells succeeded Howly, but was killed in a duel on February 16, 1780; he is omitted from nearly every list of governors, including the official register. Stephen Heard then became governor.[7]
14
Stephen Heard.jpg
Stephen Heard February 18, 1780

August 18, 1781
None
Myrick Davies August 1780

August 16, 1781
None -[i]
15 Nathan Brownson August 18, 1781

January 3, 1782
(term limited)
None 1781
16 John Martin January 3, 1782

January 8, 1783
(term limited)
None 1782
17
Lyman Hall.jpg
Lyman Hall January 8, 1783

January 9, 1784
(term limited)
None 1783
10 John Houstoun January 9, 1784

January 6, 1785
(term limited)
None 1784
18
SamuelElbert01.jpg
Samuel Elbert January 6, 1785

January 9, 1786
(term limited)
None 1785
19 Edward Telfair January 9, 1786

January 9, 1787
(term limited)
None 1786
20
Gen. George Mathews profile.png
George Mathews January 9, 1787

January 26, 1788
(term limited)
None 1787
21 George Handley January 26, 1788

January 7, 1789
(term limited)
None 1788[j]
12
George Walton.jpg
George Walton January 7, 1789

November 9, 1789
(term limited)
Democratic-
Republican
Jan. 1789
19 Edward Telfair November 9, 1789

November 7, 1793
(lost election)
Democratic-
Republican
Nov. 1789[k]
1791
20
Gen. George Mathews profile.png
George Mathews November 7, 1793

January 15, 1796
(not candidate for election)
Democratic-
Republican
1793
22
Jared Irwin.jpg
Jared Irwin January 15, 1796

January 12, 1798
(not candidate for election)
Democratic-
Republican
1795
23
JamesJackson.jpg
James Jackson January 12, 1798

March 3, 1801
(resigned)[l]
Democratic-
Republican
1797
1799
24 David Emanuel March 3, 1801

November 7, 1801
(not candidate for election)
Democratic-
Republican
Succeeded from
President of
the Senate
25 Josiah Tattnall November 7, 1801

November 4, 1802
(resigned)[m]
Democratic-
Republican
1801
26
Milledge.jpg
John Milledge November 4, 1802

September 23, 1806
(resigned)[n]
Democratic-
Republican
1802
(special)[o]
1803
1805
22
Jared Irwin.jpg
Jared Irwin September 23, 1806

November 10, 1809
(not candidate for election)
Democratic-
Republican
Succeeded from
President of
the Senate
1807
27
Davidbrydiemitchell.jpg
David Brydie Mitchell November 10, 1809

November 5, 1813
(not candidate for election)
Democratic-
Republican
1809
1811
28
GovernorPeterEarly.jpg
Peter Early November 5, 1813

November 20, 1815
(lost election)
Democratic-
Republican
1813
27
Davidbrydiemitchell.jpg
David Brydie Mitchell November 20, 1815

March 4, 1817
(resigned)[p]
Democratic-
Republican
1815
29 William Rabun March 4, 1817

October 24, 1819
(died in office)
Democratic-
Republican
Succeeded from
President of
the Senate
1817
30
Matthew Talbot.jpg
Matthew Talbot October 24, 1819

November 5, 1819
(successor took office)
Democratic-
Republican
Succeeded from
President of
the Senate
31
John Clark.jpg
John Clark November 5, 1819

November 7, 1823
(not candidate for election)
Democratic-
Republican
1819
1821
32
George M. Troup.jpg
George Troup November 7, 1823

November 7, 1827
(not candidate for election)
Democratic-
Republican
1823
1825
33
John Forsyth US Secretary of State.jpg
John Forsyth November 7, 1827

November 4, 1829
(not candidate for election)
Democratic-
Republican
1827
34
George Rockingham Gilmer.jpg
George Rockingham Gilmer November 4, 1829

November 9, 1831
(not candidate for election)
Democratic-
Republican
1829
35
Wilson Lumpkin.jpg
Wilson Lumpkin November 9, 1831

November 4, 1835
(not candidate for election)
Union (Democratic) 1831
1833
36
William Schley.jpg
William Schley November 4, 1835

November 8, 1837
(not candidate for election)
Union (Democratic) 1835
34
George Rockingham Gilmer.jpg
George Rockingham Gilmer November 8, 1837

November 6, 1839
(not candidate for election)
State Rights (Whig) 1837
37
CharlesJamesMcDonald.jpg
Charles James McDonald November 6, 1839

November 8, 1843
(not candidate for election)
Union (Democratic) 1839
1841
38
GeorgeWCrawford.jpg
George W. Crawford November 8, 1843

November 3, 1847
(not candidate for election)
Whig 1843
1845
39
GeorgeWashTowns.jpg
George W. Towns November 3, 1847

November 5, 1851
(not candidate for election)
Democratic 1847
1849
40
Howell Cobb-crop.jpg
Howell Cobb November 5, 1851

November 9, 1853
(not candidate for election)
Constitutional Union 1851
41
Herschel V. Johnson cph.3a02862.jpg
Herschel Vespasian Johnson November 9, 1853

November 6, 1857
(not candidate for election)
Democratic 1853
1855
42
Joseph Emerson Brown.jpg
Joseph E. Brown November 6, 1857

June 17, 1865[q]
(resigned)[r]
Democratic 1857
1859
1861
1863
43
JJohnson Governor.jpg
James Johnson June 17, 1865

December 14, 1865[s]
(provisional term ended)
Democratic Provisional
governor
appointed by
President
[t]
44
CharJenkins.jpg
Charles J. Jenkins December 14, 1865

January 13, 1868
(not candidate for election)
Democratic 1865[u]
45
Thomas H. Ruger.jpg
Thomas H. Ruger January 13, 1868

July 4, 1868
(state readmitted)
Military
occupation[v]
46
Rufus Bullock - Brady-Handy.jpg
Rufus Bullock July 4, 1868[w]

October 30, 1871[x]
(resigned)[y]
Republican 1868[z]
47
Benjamin Conley.jpg
Benjamin F. Conley October 30, 1871

January 12, 1872
Republican President of
the Senate
acting as
Governor
48
JamesMiltonSmith.jpg
James Milton Smith January 12, 1872

January 12, 1877
(not candidate for election)
Democratic 1871
(special)[aa]
1872
49
Alfred Holt Colquitt.jpg
Alfred H. Colquitt January 12, 1877

November 4, 1882
(not candidate for election)
Democratic 1876
1880[ab]
50
Alexander Stephens.jpg
Alexander H. Stephens November 4, 1882

March 4, 1883
(died in office)
Democratic 1882
51
James S. Boynton.jpg
James S. Boynton March 4, 1883

May 10, 1883
(not candidate for election)
Democratic President of
the Senate
acting as
Governor
52
HenryDickersonMcDaniel.jpg
Henry Dickerson McDaniel May 10, 1883

November 9, 1886
(not candidate for election)[ac]
Democratic 1883
(special)[ad]
1884
53
Jbgordon.jpg
John Brown Gordon November 9, 1886

November 8, 1890
(term limited)
Democratic 1886
1888
54
William J. Northen.jpg
William J. Northen November 8, 1890

October 27, 1894
(term limited)
Democratic 1890
1892
55
William Yates Atkinson.jpg
William Yates Atkinson October 27, 1894

October 29, 1898
(term limited)
Democratic 1894
1896
56
Allen D. Candler.jpg
Allen D. Candler October 29, 1898

October 25, 1902
(term limited)
Democratic 1898
1900
57
JosephMTerrell.jpg
Joseph M. Terrell October 25, 1902

June 29, 1907
(term limited)
Democratic 1902
1904[ae]
58
M. Hoke Smith, 1912.jpg
M. Hoke Smith June 29, 1907

June 26, 1909
(not candidate for election)
Democratic 1906
59
JosephMacBrown.jpg
Joseph Mackey Brown June 26, 1909

July 1, 1911
(not candidate for election)
Democratic 1908
58
M. Hoke Smith, 1912.jpg
M. Hoke Smith July 1, 1911

November 15, 1911[af]
(resigned)[ag]
Democratic 1910
60
John Marshall Slaton.jpg
John M. Slaton November 16, 1911

January 25, 1912
(not candidate for election)
Democratic President of
the Senate
acting as
Governor
59
JosephMacBrown.jpg
Joseph Mackey Brown January 25, 1912

June 28, 1913
(not candidate for election)
Democratic 1912
(special)[ah]
60
John Marshall Slaton.jpg
John M. Slaton June 28, 1913

June 26, 1915
(not candidate for election)
Democratic 1912
61
Nathaniel Harris 1882.png
Nathaniel Edwin Harris June 26, 1915

June 30, 1917
(not candidate for election)
Democratic 1914
62
Hugh Dorsey.jpg
Hugh Dorsey June 30, 1917

June 25, 1921
(term limited)
Democratic 1916
1918
63
Senator Thomas Hardwick.jpg
Thomas W. Hardwick June 25, 1921

June 30, 1923
(not candidate for election)
Democratic 1920
64
GovernorCliffWalker.jpg
Clifford Walker June 30, 1923

June 25, 1927
(term limited)
Democratic 1922
1924
65
Hardman222.jpg
Lamartine Griffin Hardman June 25, 1927

June 27, 1931
(term limited)
Democratic 1926
1928
66
Richard RussellJr.jpg
Richard Russell Jr. June 27, 1931

January 10, 1933
(not candidate for election)
Democratic 1930[ai]
67
Eugene Talmadge, Georgia Governor.jpg
Eugene Talmadge January 10, 1933

January 12, 1937
(term limited)
Democratic 1932
1934
68
E. D. Rivers Georgia Governor.jpg
Eurith D. Rivers January 12, 1937

January 14, 1941
(term limited)
Democratic 1936
1938
67
Eugene Talmadge, Georgia Governor.jpg
Eugene Talmadge January 14, 1941

January 12, 1943
(not candidate for election)
Democratic 1940
69 Ellis Arnall January 12, 1943

January 14, 1947
(term limited)
Democratic 1942[aj]
Eugene Talmadge, Georgia Governor.jpg
Eugene Talmadge Died before taking office Democratic 1946[ak]   Melvin E. Thompson
HermanTalmadge.jpg
Herman Talmadge January 14, 1947

March 18, 1947
(removed from office)
Democratic
70 Melvin E. Thompson March 18, 1947

November 17, 1948
(lost election)
Democratic Succeeded from
Lieutenant
Governor
Vacant
71
HermanTalmadge.jpg
Herman Talmadge November 17, 1948

January 11, 1955
(term limited)
Democratic 1948
(special)[al]
Marvin Griffin
1950
72
Marvingriffin.gif
Marvin Griffin January 11, 1955

January 13, 1959
(term limited)
Democratic 1954 Ernest Vandiver
73
Ernest Vandiver (1962).jpg
Ernest Vandiver January 13, 1959

January 15, 1963
(term limited)
Democratic 1958 Garland T. Byrd
74
Carl Sanders.jpg
Carl Sanders January 15, 1963

January 11, 1967
(term limited)
Democratic 1962 Peter Zack Geer
75
Lester Maddox.jpg
Lester Maddox January 11, 1967

January 12, 1971
(term limited)
Democratic 1966 George T. Smith
76
Jimmy Carter official portrait as Governor.jpg
Jimmy Carter January 12, 1971

January 14, 1975
(term limited)
Democratic 1970 Lester Maddox
77
George Busbee.jpg
George Busbee January 14, 1975

January 11, 1983
(term limited)
Democratic 1974 Zell Miller
1978
78
Joe Frank Harris.jpg
Joe Frank Harris January 11, 1983

January 14, 1991
(term limited)
Democratic 1982
1986
79
Zell B Miller (cropped).jpg
Zell Miller January 14, 1991

January 11, 1999
(term limited)
Democratic 1990 Pierre Howard
1994
80
Governor Roy Barnes.jpg
Roy Barnes January 11, 1999

January 13, 2003
(lost election)
Democratic 1998 Mark Taylor[am]
81
Sonny Perdue at rally.jpg
Sonny Perdue January 13, 2003

January 10, 2011
(term limited)
Republican 2002
2006 Casey Cagle
82
Nathan Deal, April 25, 2017.jpg
Nathan Deal January 10, 2011

January 14, 2019
(term limited)
Republican 2010
2014
83
David Perdue and Brian Kemp (cropped).jpg
Brian Kemp January 14, 2019

present[an]
Republican 2018 Geoff Duncan

Succession

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Data is sourced from the Official and Statistical Register of Georgia[1], unless supplemental references are required.
  2. ^ The state says Brian Kemp is the 83rd governor; this number is derived from the Official and Statistical Register of Georgia, last published by the Office of Secretary of State in 1978. It continues the numbering from the colonial governors and omits repeat governors, thus marking Archibald Bulloch as 7th and George Busbee as 77th.[1]
  3. ^ The office of Lieutenant Governor was created in 1945, first being filled in 1947.
  4. ^ The revolutionary government did not necessarily follow any schedule or term lengths, and thus the election year is omitted until 1781, when it becomes easier to determine.
  5. ^ Gwinnett was elected by the council to succeed Bulloch.[2]
  6. ^ The date given is the capture of Savannah, where the New Georgia Encyclopedia says his last official act as governor was to flee.[3]
  7. ^ a b c The capture of Savannah threw the government into disarray and exile, and records are scarce as to dates and leadership. William Glascock (elected January 21, 1779)[4] and Seth John Cuthbert (elected July 24, 1779), while often included in lists of governors, are omitted from the official state register, likely because of this reason. A school pamphlet from 1977 notes, "This confusing situation resulted in a number of radical Whigs, mainly from Wilkes County, organizing a second government with George Walton as governor and Glascock as speaker of the assembly. ... As a result of this makeshift election, there were two Whig governments plus the restored loyalist government."[5]
  8. ^ Howly resigned to be a delegate to the Continental Congress.[6]
  9. ^ Some sources say Myrick Davies was elected in August 1780 and served until his death;[7] however, he is omitted from the official state register.
  10. ^ James Jackson was elected in 1788, but declined the position, citing inexperience.[8]
  11. ^ First term under the 1789 constitution, which lengthened terms to two years.[9]
  12. ^ Jackson resigned to take an elected seat in the United States Senate.[8]
  13. ^ Tattnall resigned due to declining health.[10]
  14. ^ Milledge resigned to take an elected seat in the United States Senate.[11]
  15. ^ Special election for the remainder of Josiah Tattnall's term[12]
  16. ^ Mitchell resigned to be agent to the Creek Indians.[13]
  17. ^ One source states Brown left office on June 25, which could make sense as it would take several days for news of Johnson's appointment to reach Georgia. However, this source has not been corroborated.[14]
  18. ^ Brown resigned following the defeat of the Confederate States of America.[15]
  19. ^ At least one source states Johnson left office "five days after" Jenkins took office, which would be December 19.[16] However, more contemporary sources say he left office on December 14.[17]
  20. ^ Johnson was appointed provisional governor by the Union occupation.[16]
  21. ^ Jenkins was removed from office by the military because he refused to allow state funds to be used for a racially integrated state constitutional convention; the state was still under military occupation during Reconstruction.[18]
  22. ^ Provisional governor appointed by General George Meade[19]
  23. ^ Some sources state Bullock took office on July 21, but more contemporary sources say July 4.[17]
  24. ^ Some sources state Bullock resigned on October 23, but that is when he secretly submitted his resignation; it did not take effect until October 30.[20]
  25. ^ Bullock resigned and fled the state to avoid impeachment; he was arrested in 1876 and found not guilty of embezzlement.[20]
  26. ^ First term under the 1868 constitution, which lengthened terms to four years.[21]
  27. ^ Special election for the remainder of Rufus Bullock's term[22]
  28. ^ First term under the 1877 constitution, which shortened terms to two years.[23]
  29. ^ McDaniel's first term was shortened, so it is not known if he can be considered term limited.
  30. ^ Special election for the remainder of Alexander Stephens' term[24]
  31. ^ The start of a gubernatorial term has always been set by the legislature, rather than the constitution; it appears the start of this term changed from the last Saturday in October to the last Saturday in June, lengthening it by eight months.
  32. ^ Sources are split on whether Smith resigned on November 15 or November 16, with contemporary sources leaning towards November 15.[25]
  33. ^ Smith resigned to take an elected seat in the United States Senate.[26]
  34. ^ Special election for the remainder of Hoke Smith's term[27]
  35. ^ The start of the term changed from the last Saturday in June to the second Tuesday in January, shortening this term by five months.[28]
  36. ^ First term under the 1941 amendment to the constitution, which lengthened terms to four years.[29]
  37. ^ Eugene Talmadge was elected to a third term in 1946, but died before taking office. Ellis Arnall, governor at the time, claimed the office, as did Lieutenant Governor Melvin Thompson. The state legislature chose Eugene Talmadge's son, Herman Talmadge, to be governor, but during what came to be called the "Three Governors controversy", the state supreme court declared this unconstitutional and declared Thompson rightful governor, and Talmadge stepped down after 67 days. Talmadge later defeated Thompson in a special election.[30]
  38. ^ Special election to fill Eugene Talmadge's term[30]
  39. ^ Represented the Democratic Party
  40. ^ Kemp's first term expires January 9, 2023.

References

General

  • "Former Georgia Governors". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 10, 2019.
  • "The New Georgia Encyclopedia". Retrieved June 21, 2019.
  • A History of Georgia, second ed. Kenneth Coleman, general editor. University of Georgia Press: 1991.
  • The Revolutionary Records of the State of Georgia Volume 1. Retrieved August 28, 2016.
  • Sobel, Robert (1978). Biographical directory of the governors of the United States, 1789-1978, Vol. I. Meckler Books. ISBN 9780930466015. Retrieved July 10, 2019.

Constitutions

Specific

  1. ^ a b "Georgia Official and Statistical Register, 1977-1978 - page 1145". Digital Library of Georgia. Retrieved January 15, 2019.
  2. ^ "Button Gwinnett". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 21, 2019.
  3. ^ "John Houstoun". New Georgia Encyclopedia. Retrieved January 15, 2019.
  4. ^ Autobiography of a Colony: The First Half-Century of Augusta, Georgia. University of Georgia Press. 2009. p. 127. Retrieved January 15, 2019.
  5. ^ "Political Changes in Georgia 1775-1787" (PDF). Georgia Department of Education. Retrieved January 15, 2019.
  6. ^ "Richard Howley". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 21, 2019.
  7. ^ "Stephen Heard". New Georgia Encyclopedia. Retrieved January 15, 2019.
  8. ^ a b "James Jackson". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 10, 2019.
  9. ^ Cite error: The named reference 1789const-a2s1 was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  10. ^ "Josiah Tattnall". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 21, 2019.
  11. ^ "John Milledge". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 21, 2019.
  12. ^ "Georgia 1802 Governor, Special". Tufts University. Retrieved August 28, 2016.
  13. ^ "David Brydie Mitchell". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 21, 2019.
  14. ^ Otto, John Henry (2004). Memoirs of a Dutch Mudsill. Kent State University Press.
  15. ^ "Joseph Emerson Brown". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 21, 2019.
  16. ^ a b "James Johnson". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 10, 2019.
  17. ^ a b The Government of the People of the State of Georgia. 1896. pp. 184–186. Retrieved August 27, 2016.
  18. ^ "Charles Jones Jenkins (1805-1883)". New Georgia Encyclopedia. Retrieved June 21, 2019.
  19. ^ "Thomas Ruger (1833-1907)". New Georgia Encyclopedia. Retrieved June 21, 2019.
  20. ^ a b "This Day in Georgia History - October 23, 1871: Rufus Bullock Resigned". Georgia Library Learning Online. Retrieved August 27, 2016.
  21. ^ Cite error: The named reference 1868const-a4-s1 was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  22. ^ "James Milton Smith". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 21, 2019.
  23. ^ Cite error: The named reference 1877const-a5-s1 was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  24. ^ "Henry Dickerson McDaniel". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 21, 2019.
  25. ^ Official Congressional Directory. 1919. p. 17. Retrieved August 27, 2016.
  26. ^ "Hoke Smith". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 21, 2019.
  27. ^ "Joseph Mackey Brown". National Governors Association. Retrieved June 21, 2019.
  28. ^ "Richard Brevard Russell". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 10, 2019.
  29. ^ Cite error: The named reference amendment-1941 was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  30. ^ a b "Three Governors Controversy". New Georgia Encyclopedia. Retrieved June 21, 2019.
This page was last edited on 13 September 2020, at 13:03
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