To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

List of governors of Connecticut

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Governor of Connecticut
Seal of the Governor of Connecticut.svg
Seal of the Governor
Incumbent
Ned Lamont

since January 9, 2019
StyleHis Excellency
ResidenceConnecticut Governor's Residence
Term lengthFour years
Inaugural holderJonathan Trumbull
DeputyLieutenant Governor of Connecticut
Salary$150,000 (2013)[1] (Governor Lamont has declined a salary)[2]
WebsiteOffice of the Governor

The Governor of Connecticut is the elected head of the executive branch of Connecticut's state government, and the commander-in-chief of the state's military forces. The governor has a duty to enforce state laws, and the power to either approve or veto bills passed by the Connecticut General Assembly and to convene the legislature.[3] Unusual among U.S. governors, the Governor of Connecticut has no power to pardon.[4] The Governor of Connecticut is automatically a member of the state's Bonding Commission. He is an ex-officio member of the Board of Trustees of the University of Connecticut and Yale University.

There have been 68 post-Revolution governors of the state, serving 72 distinct spans in office. Four have served non-consecutive terms: Henry W. Edwards, James E. English, Marshall Jewell, and Raymond E. Baldwin. The longest terms in office were in the state's early years, when four governors were elected to nine or more one-year terms. The longest was that of the first governor, Jonathan Trumbull, who served over 14 years, but 7 of those as colonial governor; the longest-serving state governor — with no other position included in the term — was his son, Jonathan Trumbull Jr., who served over 11 years. The shortest term was that of Hiram Bingham III, who served only one day before resigning to take an elected seat in the U.S. Senate. Lowell Weicker, is noted for a rare third party win in American politics, having been elected to a term in 1990 representing A Connecticut Party.

The current governor is Ned Lamont, a Democrat who took office on January 9, 2019.

Governors

For the period before independence, see the list of colonial governors of Connecticut.

Connecticut was one of the original Thirteen Colonies and was admitted as a state on January 9, 1788.[5] Before it declared its independence, Connecticut was a colony of the Kingdom of Great Britain.

Connecticut did not create a state constitution for itself until several decades after it became a state; until 1818, the state operated under the provisions of its colonial charter. The charter called for the election of a governor every year, but not more than once every two years, with the term commencing on the second Thursday in May.[6]

The current Constitution of Connecticut, ratified in 1965, calls for a four-year term for the governor,[7] commencing on the Wednesday after the first Monday in the January following an election.[8] The previous constitution of 1818 originally had only a one-year term for governor; this was increased to two years in 1875,[9] and four years in 1948.[10] The 1875 amendment also set the start date of the term to its current date; before then, it was the first Wednesday in the May following an election.[11] The constitution provides for the election of a lieutenant governor for the same term as the governor. The two offices are elected on the same ticket; this provision was added in 1962.[12] In the event of a vacancy in the office of governor, the lieutenant governor becomes governor.[13] Before the adoption of the 1965 constitution, the lieutenant governor only acted as governor.[14] There is no limit of any kind on the number of terms one may serve.

Governors of the State of Connecticut[a]
No.[b] Governor Term in office Party Election Lt. Governor[c][d]
16
JohnTrumbull.jpg
  Jonathan Trumbull 1769

May 13, 1784
(not candidate for election)
No party 1776[e]   Matthew Griswold
1777
1778
1779
1780
1781
1782
1783
17 Matthew Griswold May 13, 1784

May 11, 1786
(lost election)[17]
Federalist 1784 Samuel Huntington
1785
18
Samuel Huntington - Charles Willson Peale.jpg
Samuel Huntington May 11, 1786

January 5, 1796
(died in office)
Federalist 1786 Oliver Wolcott
1787
1788
1789
1790
1791
1792
1793
1794
1795
19
Oliver Wolcott Ralph Earl.jpeg
Oliver Wolcott January 5, 1796

December 1, 1797
(died in office)
Federalist Lieutenant
Governor
acting as
Governor
Acting as Governor
1796 Jonathan Trumbull Jr.
1797
20
JonathanTrumbull.jpg
Jonathan Trumbull Jr. December 1, 1797

August 7, 1809
(died in office)
Federalist Lieutenant
Governor
acting as
Governor
Acting as Governor
1798 John Treadwell
1799
1800
1801
1802
1803
1804
1805
1806
1807
1808
1809
21
John Treadwell (Connecticut Governor).jpg
John Treadwell August 7, 1809

May 9, 1811
(lost election)[18]
Federalist Lieutenant
Governor
acting as
Governor
Acting as Governor
1810 Roger Griswold
22 Roger Griswold May 9, 1811

October 25, 1812
(died in office)
Federalist 1811 John Cotton Smith
1812
23
John Cotton Smith engraving.png
John Cotton Smith October 25, 1812

May 8, 1817
(lost election)
Federalist Lieutenant
Governor
acting as
Governor
Acting as Governor
1813 Chauncey Goodrich
(died August 18, 1815)
1814
1815
Vacant
1816 Jonathan Ingersoll[f]
(died January 12, 1823)
24
Oliver Wolcott Jr by Gilbert Stuart circa 1820.jpeg
Oliver Wolcott Jr. May 8, 1817

May 2, 1827
(lost election)
Toleration
Republican
1817
1818
1819
1820
1821
1822
Vacant
1823 David Plant[g]
1824
1825
1826
25
Gideon Tomlinson (Conn. Rep., Gov., US Sen.).jpg
Gideon Tomlinson May 2, 1827

March 2, 1831
(resigned)[h]
Democratic-
Republican
1827 John Samuel Peters[g]
National Republican 1828
1829
1830
26
JohnSamuelPeters (cropped).jpg
John Samuel Peters March 2, 1831

May 1, 1833
(lost election)
National
Republican
Lieutenant
Governor
acting as
Governor
Acting as Governor
1831[i] Vacant
1832 Thaddeus Betts
27
HenryEdwards.jpg
Henry W. Edwards May 1, 1833

May 7, 1834
(lost election)
Democratic 1833 Ebenezer Stoddard
28
Samuel Augustus Foot.jpg
Samuel A. Foot May 7, 1834

May 6, 1835
(lost election)
Whig 1834 Thaddeus Betts
29
HenryEdwards.jpg
Henry W. Edwards May 6, 1835

May 2, 1838
(not candidate for election)
Democratic 1835 Ebenezer Stoddard
1836
1837
30
William Wolcott Ellsworth.jpeg
William W. Ellsworth May 2, 1838

May 4, 1842
(lost election)
Whig 1838 Charles Hawley
1839
1840
1841
31
Chauncey Fitch Cleveland (Connecticut Governor).jpg
Chauncey Fitch Cleveland May 4, 1842

May 1, 1844
(lost election)
Democratic 1842 William S. Holabird
1843
32
GovRogerBaldwin.jpg
Roger Sherman Baldwin May 1, 1844

May 6, 1846
(not candidate for election)
Whig 1844 Reuben Booth
1845
33
Isaac Toucey - Brady-Handy.jpg
Isaac Toucey May 6, 1846

May 5, 1847
(not candidate for election)
Democratic 1846 Noyes Billings
34
Clark Bissell professor of law Yale and Governor of Connecticut.jpg
Clark Bissell May 5, 1847

May 2, 1849
(not candidate for election)
Whig 1847 Charles J. McCurdy
1848
35
Joseph Trumbull Connecticut Governor.jpg
Joseph Trumbull May 2, 1849

May 4, 1850
(not candidate for election)
Whig 1849 Thomas Backus
36
ThomasHartSeymour.jpg
Thomas H. Seymour May 4, 1850[j]

October 13, 1853
(resigned)[k]
Democratic 1850 Charles H. Pond
1851 Green Kendrick
1852 Charles H. Pond
1853
37
Charles H. Pond (Connecticut Governor).jpg
Charles H. Pond October 13, 1853

May 3, 1854
(not candidate for election)
Democratic Lieutenant
Governor
acting as
Governor
Acting as Governor
38
Henry Dutton (Connecticut Governor).jpg
Henry Dutton May 3, 1854

May 2, 1855
(lost election)
Whig 1854 Alexander H. Holley
39
William T. Minor.jpg
William T. Minor May 2, 1855

May 6, 1857
(not candidate for election)
American 1855 William Field
1856 Albert Day
40
Alexander H. Holley (Connecticut Governor).jpg
Alexander H. Holley May 6, 1857

May 5, 1858
(not candidate for election)
Republican 1857 Alfred A. Burnham
41
William A. Buckingham (Connecticut Governor).jpg
William Alfred Buckingham May 5, 1858

May 2, 1866
(not candidate for election)
Republican 1858 Julius Catlin
1859
1860
1861 Benjamin Douglas
1862 [l] Roger Averill
1863
National Union 1864
1865
42
Joseph Roswell Hawley - Brady-Handy.jpg
Joseph Roswell Hawley May 2, 1866

May 1, 1867
(lost election)
Republican 1866 Oliver Winchester
43
JEEnglish.jpg
James E. English May 1, 1867

May 5, 1869
(lost election)
Democratic 1867 Ephraim H. Hyde
1868
44
Marshall Jewell - Brady-Handy.jpg
Marshall Jewell May 5, 1869

May 4, 1870
(lost election)
Republican 1869 Francis Wayland III
45
JEEnglish.jpg
James E. English May 4, 1870

May 16, 1871
(lost election)[m]
Democratic 1870 Julius Hotchkiss
46
Marshall Jewell - Brady-Handy.jpg
Marshall Jewell May 16, 1871

May 7, 1873
(not candidate for election)
Republican 1871[m] Morris Tyler
1872
47
Charles R. Ingersoll (Connecticut Governor).jpg
Charles Roberts Ingersoll May 7, 1873

January 3, 1877
(not candidate for election)
Democratic 1873 George G. Sill
1874
1875[n]
April 1876[o]
48
Richard D. Hubbard (Connecticut Governor).jpg
Richard D. Hubbard January 3, 1877

January 9, 1879
(lost election)
Democratic November 1876[p] Francis Loomis
49
Charles B. Andrews (Connecticut Governor).jpg
Charles B. Andrews January 9, 1879[q]

January 5, 1881
(not candidate for election)
Republican 1878 David Gallup
50
Hobart Baldwin Bigelow (Connecticut Governor).jpg
Hobart B. Bigelow January 5, 1881

January 3, 1883
(not candidate for election)
Republican 1880 William H. Bulkeley
51
Thomas M. Waller (Connecticut Governor).jpg
Thomas M. Waller January 3, 1883

January 8, 1885
(lost election)
Democratic 1882 George G. Sumner
52
Henry Baldwin Harrison (Connecticut Governor).jpg
Henry Baldwin Harrison January 8, 1885[r]

January 7, 1887
(not candidate for election)
Republican 1884 Lorrin A. Cooke
53
Phineas C. Lounsbury (Connecticut Governor).jpg
Phineas C. Lounsbury January 7, 1887[s]

January 10, 1889
(not candidate for election)
Republican 1886 James L. Howard
54
Bulkeley Morgan 2.jpg
Morgan Bulkeley January 10, 1889[t]

January 4, 1893
(not candidate for election)
Republican 1888 Samuel E. Merwin
1890[u]
55
Luzon B. Morris (Connecticut Governor).jpg
Luzon B. Morris January 4, 1893

January 9, 1895
(not candidate for election)
Democratic 1892 Ernest Cady
56
Owen Vincent Coffin (Connecticut Governor).jpg
Owen Vincent Coffin January 9, 1895

January 6, 1897
(not candidate for election)
Republican 1894 Lorrin A. Cooke
57
Lorrin A. Cooke (Connecticut Governor).jpg
Lorrin A. Cooke January 6, 1897

January 4, 1899
(not candidate for election)
Republican 1896 James D. Dewell
58
George E. Lounsbury.jpg
George E. Lounsbury January 4, 1899

January 9, 1901
(not candidate for election)
Republican 1898 Lyman A. Mills
59
George P. McLean.jpg
George P. McLean January 9, 1901

January 7, 1903
(not candidate for election)
Republican 1900 Edwin O. Keeler
60
Abiram Chamberlain (Connecticut Governor).jpg
Abiram Chamberlain January 7, 1903

January 4, 1905
(not candidate for election)
Republican 1902 Henry Roberts
61
Henry Roberts (Connecticut Governor).jpg
Henry Roberts January 4, 1905

January 9, 1907
(not candidate for election)
Republican 1904 Rollin S. Woodruff
62
Rollin S. Woodruff (Connecticut Governor).jpg
Rollin S. Woodruff January 9, 1907

January 6, 1909
(not candidate for election)
Republican 1906 Everett J. Lake
63
GeorgeLLilley.jpg
George L. Lilley January 6, 1909

April 21, 1909
(died in office)
Republican 1908 Frank B. Weeks
64
Frank B. Weeks (Connecticut Governor).jpg
Frank B. Weeks April 21, 1909

January 4, 1911
(not candidate for election)
Republican Lieutenant
Governor
acting as
Governor
Acting as Governor
65
Simeon Eben Baldwin.jpg
Simeon Eben Baldwin January 4, 1911

January 6, 1915
(not candidate for election)
Democratic 1910 Dennis A. Blakeslee[v]
1912 Lyman T. Tingier
66
Marcus H. Holcomb (Connecticut Governor).jpg
Marcus H. Holcomb January 6, 1915

January 5, 1921
(not candidate for election)
Republican 1914 Clifford B. Wilson
1916
1918
67
Everett J. Lake (Connecticut Governor).jpg
Everett J. Lake January 5, 1921

January 3, 1923
(not candidate for election)
Republican 1920 Charles A. Templeton
68
Charles A. Templeton (Connecticut Governor).jpg
Charles A. Templeton January 3, 1923

January 7, 1925
(not candidate for election)
Republican 1922 Hiram Bingham III
69
HirambinghamIII.jpg
Hiram Bingham III January 7, 1925

January 8, 1925
(resigned)[w]
Republican 1924 John H. Trumbull
70 John H. Trumbull January 8, 1925

January 7, 1931
(not candidate for election)
Republican Lieutenant
Governor
acting as
Governor
Acting as Governor[x]
1926 J. Edwin Brainard
1928 Ernest E. Rogers
71
Wilbur L Cross sitting in chair.jpg
Wilbur Lucius Cross January 7, 1931

January 4, 1939
(lost election)
Democratic 1930 Samuel R. Spencer[v]
1932 Roy C. Wilcox[v]
1934 T. Frank Hayes
1936
72
Raymond Earl Baldwin.jpg
Raymond E. Baldwin January 4, 1939

January 8, 1941
(lost election)
Republican 1938 James L. McConaughy
73 Robert A. Hurley January 8, 1941

January 6, 1943
(lost election)
Democratic 1940 Odell Shepard
74
Raymond Earl Baldwin.jpg
Raymond E. Baldwin January 6, 1943

December 27, 1946
(resigned)[y]
Republican 1942 William L. Hadden
1944 Charles Wilbert Snow[z]
75 Charles Wilbert Snow December 27, 1946

January 8, 1947
(successor took office)
Democratic Lieutenant
Governor
acting as
Governor
Acting as Governor
76 James L. McConaughy January 8, 1947

March 7, 1948
(died in office)
Republican 1946 James C. Shannon
77 James C. Shannon March 7, 1948

January 5, 1949
(lost election)
Republican Lieutenant
Governor
acting as
Governor
Acting as Governor[aa]
78
Chester Bowles (Connecticut Governor and Congressman).jpg
Chester Bowles January 5, 1949

January 3, 1951
(lost election)
Democratic 1948 William T. Carroll
79
John Davis Lodge.jpg
John Davis Lodge January 3, 1951

January 5, 1955
(lost election)
Republican 1950[ab] Edward N. Allen
80
Ribicoff.jpg
Abraham Ribicoff January 5, 1955

January 21, 1961
(resigned)[ac]
Democratic 1954 Charles W. Jewett
1958 John N. Dempsey
81
John Dempsey Connecticut.jpg
John N. Dempsey January 21, 1961

January 6, 1971
(not candidate for election)
Democratic Lieutenant
Governor
acting as
Governor
Acting as Governor[ad]
1962 Samuel J. Tedesco
(resigned January 15, 1966)
Fred J. Doocy
1966 Attilio R. Frassinelli
82
Thomas Meskill (cropped).jpg
Thomas Meskill January 6, 1971

January 8, 1975
(not candidate for election)
Republican 1970 T. Clark Hull
(resigned June 1, 1973)
Peter L. Cashman
83
Ella Grasso.jpg
Ella Grasso January 8, 1975

December 31, 1980
(resigned)[ae]
Democratic 1974 Robert K. Killian
1978 William A. O'Neill
84 William A. O'Neill December 31, 1980

January 9, 1991
(not candidate for election)
Democratic Succeeded from
Lieutenant
Governor
Joseph J. Fauliso
1982
1986
85
Lweicker.jpg
Lowell Weicker January 9, 1991

January 4, 1995
(not candidate for election)
A Connecticut Party 1990 Eunice Groark
86
John Rowland (cropped).jpg
John G. Rowland January 4, 1995

July 1, 2004
(resigned)[af]
Republican 1994 Jodi Rell
1998
2002
87
FEMA - 29383 - Photograph by Debra Young taken on 04-19-2007 in Connecticut.jpg
Jodi Rell July 1, 2004

January 5, 2011
(not candidate for election)
Republican Succeeded from
Lieutenant
Governor
Kevin Sullivan[z]
2006 Michael Fedele
88
Dannel Malloy 2016.jpg
Dannel Malloy January 5, 2011

January 9, 2019
(not candidate for election)
Democratic 2010 Nancy Wyman
2014
89
Governor Ned Lamont of Connecticut, official portrait (cropped).jpg
Ned Lamont January 9, 2019

present[ag]
Democratic 2018 Susan Bysiewicz

Succession

Notes

  1. ^ Data is sourced from the National Governors Association, unless supplemental references are required.
  2. ^ According to the Connecticut State Library, the official listing goes back to the first governor of Connecticut Colony in 1639, and did not include repeat governors serving non-consecutive terms in the colonial period; this makes Trumbull the 16th governor.[15] The official numbering since statehood includes repeat and acting governors.
  3. ^ The office of Lieutenant Governor was known as Deputy-Governor under the colonial charter, but the name 'Lieutenant Governor' was predominantly used after independence.[6]
  4. ^ Lieutenant governors represented the same party as their governor unless noted.
  5. ^ The Connecticut General Assembly approved the United States Declaration of Independence on October 10, 1776, and resolved that the state's government would continue as established under the charter. So, as colonial governor, Jonathan Trumbull became state governor, serving roughly 14 years total.[16]
  6. ^ Represented the Democratic-Republican Party until 1817, and the Toleration Party after that.
  7. ^ a b Represented the National Republican Party
  8. ^ Tomlinson resigned to take an elected seat in the United States Senate.[19]
  9. ^ John Samuel Peters became Acting Governor on March 2, 1831 following the resignation of Gideon Tomlinson. It was too close to the April election to nominate a Lieutenant Governor, so the office remained vacant for one year.
  10. ^ The constitutional start date for the term in 1850 was May 1; the delay may be because Seymour was chosen by the legislature after a close election.[20]
  11. ^ Seymour resigned to be U.S. Minister to Russia.[20]
  12. ^ Separate Unionist and Republican conventions held in January 1862 endorsed a fusion ticket of Republicans and War Democrats. The Democratic Party endorsed their own ticket. The Unionist/Republican ticket included Republican Buckingham and War Democrat Averill, and would win the election.
  13. ^ a b James English won the popular vote, but a canvassing committee found the election was fraudulent, and named Jewell governor several days into the term.[21]
  14. ^ This term was lengthened by nearly 8 months due to a constitutional amendment moving the election schedule.[9]
  15. ^ This term was only from May 1876 to January 1877, due to a constitutional amendment moving the election schedule.[9]
  16. ^ First election in November, and first term under a constitutional amendment which lengthened terms to two years.[9]
  17. ^ The constitutional start date for the term in 1879 was January 8; the delay may be because Andrews was chosen by the legislature after a close election.[22][23]
  18. ^ The constitutional start date for the term in 1885 was January 7; the delay may be because Harrison was chosen by the legislature after a close election.[24]
  19. ^ The constitutional start date for the term in 1887 was January 5; the delay may be because Lounsbury was chosen by the legislature after a close election.[25]
  20. ^ The constitutional start date for the term in 1889 was January 9; the delay may be because Bulkeley was chosen by the legislature after a close election.[26]
  21. ^ Morgan Bulkeley did not run for re-election in 1890, but due to such a close contest and controversies, the results were not certified, and the legislature spent two years debating the issue; Bulkeley essentially served as governor by default.[26]
  22. ^ a b c Represented the Republican Party
  23. ^ Bingham resigned to take an elected seat in the United States Senate.[27]
  24. ^ Since Trumbull took over only one day into the term, nearly all sources describe J. Edwin Brainard as lieutenant governor during this term; however, constitutionally, he would have remained president of the senate and only acted as lieutenant governor. At least one contemporary news source describes him as such.[28]
  25. ^ Baldwin resigned to take an elected seat in the United States Senate.[29]
  26. ^ a b Represented the Democratic Party
  27. ^ Robert E. Parsons is always listed as serving as lieutenant governor during this term, but constitutionally he likely would have remained president of the senate. However, questions were raised over whether or not they should fully succeed to the next office.[30]
  28. ^ First term under a constitution amendment which lengthened terms to four years.[10]
  29. ^ Ribicoff resigned to become United States Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare.[31]
  30. ^ Anthony J. Armentano is always listed as serving as lieutenant governor during this term, but constitutionally he likely would have remained president of the senate. This is the last time such a confusion would exist, as the 1965 constitution established a solid line of succession.
  31. ^ Grasso resigned due to ovarian cancer.[32]
  32. ^ Rowland resigned due to a federal corruption investigation;[33] he later pleaded guilty to corruption.[34]
  33. ^ Lamont's first term expires on January 4, 2023.

References

General
  • "Governors of Connecticut". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 10, 2019.
  • "Roster of Connecticut Governors". Connecticut State Library. Retrieved December 15, 2018.
  • Loomis, Dwight; Joseph Gilbert Calhoun (1895). The Judicial and Civil History of Connecticut. The Boston History Company. pp. 114–117. Retrieved August 4, 2010.
  • Sobel, Robert (1978). Biographical directory of the governors of the United States, 1789-1978, Vol. I. Meckler Books. ISBN 9780930466015. Retrieved July 10, 2019.
Constitutions
Specific
  1. ^ "CSG Releases 2013 Governor Salaries". The Council of State Governments. June 25, 2013. Retrieved November 23, 2014.
  2. ^ "When it comes to giving at the office, Gov. Lamont is writing checks and not taking a salary". The Hartford Courant. July 7, 2019. Retrieved April 4, 2020.
  3. ^ CT Const. art. IV
  4. ^ "Pardons Power in Connecticut". Archived from the original on June 13, 2008. Retrieved June 13, 2008.
  5. ^ "Today in History: January 9". Library of Congress. Retrieved February 21, 2009.
  6. ^ a b 1662 Charter
  7. ^ CT Const. art. IV, § 1
  8. ^ CT Const. art. IV, § 2
  9. ^ a b c d 1818 Const. amendment XVI
  10. ^ a b 1818 Const. amendment XLV
  11. ^ 1818 Const. art. IV § 1
  12. ^ 1818 Const. new amendment VII
  13. ^ CT Const. art. IV § 19
  14. ^ 1818 Const. art. IV § 14
  15. ^ "Roster of Connecticut Governors". Connecticut State Library. Retrieved April 4, 2008.
  16. ^ "Jonathan Trumbull". Connecticut State Library. Archived from the original on 2008-12-26. Retrieved 2009-03-10.
  17. ^ "Matthew Griswold". Connecticut State Library. Retrieved December 15, 2018.
  18. ^ "John Treadwell". Connecticut State Library. Retrieved December 17, 2018.
  19. ^ "Gideon Tomlinson". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 10, 2019.
  20. ^ a b "Thomas H. Seymour". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 10, 2019.
  21. ^ "James Edward English". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 10, 2019.
  22. ^ "Charles Bartlett Andrews". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 10, 2019.
  23. ^ "Governor Andrews' First Message". New York Herald. New York City. January 10, 1879. Retrieved December 19, 2018.
  24. ^ "Henry Baldwin Harrison". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 10, 2019.
  25. ^ "Phineas Chapman Lounsbury". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 10, 2019.
  26. ^ a b "Morgan Gardner Bulkeley". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 10, 2019.
  27. ^ "Hiram Bingham". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 10, 2019.
  28. ^ "Unknown title". Hartford Courant. Hartford, Connecticut. January 11, 1925. Retrieved December 18, 2018. Acting Lieutenant-Governor Brainard, once a foundry hand...
  29. ^ "Raymond Early Baldwin". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 10, 2019.
  30. ^ "Doubt Cast on Parsons's Right to Title". Hartford Courant. Hartford, Connecticut. March 31, 1948. Retrieved December 18, 2018.
  31. ^ "Abraham Alexander Ribicoff". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 10, 2019.
  32. ^ "Ella T. Grasso". National Governors Association. Retrieved July 10, 2019.
  33. ^ William Yardley; Stacey Stowe; Avi Salzman and Alison Leigh Cowan (June 22, 2004). "Connecticut's Governor Steps Down". The New York Times.CS1 maint: uses authors parameter (link)
  34. ^ Robert D. McFadden (December 24, 2004). "An Ex-Governor Says He's Guilty". The New York Times.

External links

This page was last edited on 22 September 2020, at 02:02
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.