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List of Church of England dioceses

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Dioceses of the Church of England▉ Province of Canterbury▉ Province of York(interactive version)
Dioceses of the Church of England
Province of Canterbury
Province of York
(interactive version)

There are 42 Church of England dioceses,[1] each being an administrative territorial unit governed by a bishop.[2] These cover England, the Isle of Man, the Channel Islands and a small part of Wales. The Diocese in Europe is also a part of the Church of England,[1] and covers the whole of continental Europe, Morocco and the post-Soviet states.[3] The structure of dioceses within the Church of England was initially inherited from the Catholic Church as part of the Protestant Reformation.[4] During the Reformation a number of new dioceses were founded,[5] but no more were then created until the middle of the 19th century,[6] when dioceses were founded mainly in response to the growing population, especially in the northern industrial cities.[7] The most recent diocese to be established was the Diocese of Leeds, which came into being on 20 April 2014.[8] Prior to that, no new dioceses had been founded since 1927. Leeds was created by combining three previous dioceses: the Diocese of Bradford, the Diocese of Ripon and Leeds, and the Diocese of Wakefield.[citation needed]

The 42 current dioceses are divided into two provinces. The Province of Canterbury in the south comprises 30 dioceses and the Province of York in the north comprises 12.[1] The archbishops of Canterbury and York have pastoral oversight over the bishops within their province, along with certain other rights and responsibilities.[9] All of the dioceses have one cathedral each except the Diocese of Leeds, which has three that are considered co-equal. Of all the dioceses, Derby has the smallest cathedral; Derby Cathedral takes up only 10,950 square feet (1,000 m2).[10] One diocese dates back to the 6th century, eight date back to the 7th century, two to the 10th century, five to the 11th century, two to the 12th century, five to the 16th century, seven to the 19th century, and ten to the 20th century. The territories administered by the various dioceses generally accord with the counties as they existed before the Local Government Act 1972.

Dioceses

Diocese[11]
(bishop)
Coat of arms[12] Province[1] Territory[1] Cathedral[13] Founded[14]
Bath and Wells
(Bishop)
Canterbury Somerset; North Somerset; Bath and North East Somerset; the parish of Thorncombe in Dorset[15] Wells Cathedral[16] 909 (Diocese of Wells)[17]
Birmingham
(Bishop)
Canterbury Birmingham; Sandwell except part of the north; Solihull except part of the east; part of Warwickshire; some parishes in Worcestershire[18] St Philip's Cathedral[19] 1905[20]
Blackburn
(Bishop)
York Lancashire except part of the east and south, Liverpool, and Manchester; some parishes in Wigan[21] Blackburn Cathedral[22] 12 November 1926
(from Manchester)[23]
Bristol
(Bishop)
Canterbury Bristol; southern two-thirds of South Gloucestershire; northern quarter of Wiltshire except part of the north; Swindon except part of the north and south; some parishes in Gloucestershire[24] Bristol Cathedral[25] 1542[26]
Canterbury
(Archbishop)
Canterbury Kent east of Medway[27] Canterbury Cathedral[28] 597[29]
Carlisle
(Bishop)
York Cumbria except Alston Moor (part of the Diocese of Newcastle), and the former Sedbergh Rural District (part of the Diocese of Leeds)[30] Carlisle Cathedral[31] 1133[32]
Chelmsford
(Bishop)
Canterbury Essex except part of the north; part of East London north of the River Thames; part of South Cambridgeshire[33] Chelmsford Cathedral[34] 1914
Chester
(Bishop)
York Cheshire; the Wirral Peninsula; Halton south of the River Mersey; Warrington south of the River Mersey; Trafford except part of the north; Stockport except part of the north and east; the eastern half of Tameside; part of Derbyshire; part of Manchester; part of Flintshire[35] Chester Cathedral[36] 1541
Chichester
(Bishop)
[37] Canterbury West Sussex except part of the north; East Sussex except part of the north; part of Kent[38] Chichester Cathedral[39] 1075
Coventry
(Bishop)
Canterbury Coventry; Warwickshire except part of the north, southwest, and south; part of Solihull[40] Coventry Cathedral[41] 1918
Derby
(Bishop)
Canterbury Derbyshire except part of the north; part of Stockport; part of Staffordshire[42] Derby Cathedral[43] 1927[44]
Durham
(Bishop)
York Durham except part of the southwest and north; Gateshead; South Tyneside; Sunderland; Hartlepool; Darlington; Stockton-on-Tees north of the River Tees[45] Durham Cathedral[46] 990
Ely
(Bishop)
Canterbury Cambridgeshire except part of the northwest and south; the western quarter of Norfolk; part of Bedfordshire[47] Ely Cathedral[48] 1109
Europe
(Bishop)
Canterbury Europe except Great Britain and Ireland; Morocco; Turkey; the post-Soviet states in Asia[49] Gibraltar Cathedral[50] 21 August 1842 (Diocese of Gibraltar)[51]
1980 (Diocese in Europe)
Exeter
(Bishop)
Canterbury Devon except part of the southeast and west; Plymouth; Torbay[52] Exeter Cathedral[53] 1050
Gloucester
(Bishop)
Canterbury Gloucestershire except part of the north, south, and east; the northern third of South Gloucestershire; part of Wiltshire; part of southwest Warwickshire; part of southern Worcestershire[54] Gloucester Cathedral[55] 1541
Guildford
(Bishop)
Canterbury The western two-thirds of Surrey south of the River Thames except part of the northeast; part of northeastern Hampshire; part of Greater London; part of West Sussex[56] Guildford Cathedral[57] 1927
Hereford
(Bishop)
Canterbury Herefordshire; the southern half of Shropshire; part of Powys and Monmouthshire[58] Hereford Cathedral[59] 676
Leeds
(Bishop)
York Ripon; Bradford; Leeds; Huddersfield; Wakefield[60] Co-equally:
Ripon Cathedral,
Wakefield Cathedral,
Bradford Cathedral[61]
20 April 2014 (thereby dissolving the dioceses of Bradford, Ripon and Leeds, and Wakefield)[8]
Leicester
(Bishop)
Canterbury Leicestershire; part of Northamptonshire, Derbyshire, and Warwickshire[62] Leicester Cathedral[63] 1926
Lichfield
(Bishop)
Canterbury Staffordshire except part of the southeast and southwest; the northern half of Shropshire; Wolverhampton; Walsall; the northern half of Sandwell[64] Lichfield Cathedral[65] 664
Lincoln
(Bishop)
Canterbury Lincolnshire; North East Lincolnshire; North Lincolnshire except part of the west[66] Lincoln Cathedral[67] 1074
Liverpool
(Bishop)
York Liverpool; Sefton; Knowsley; St Helens; Wigan except part of the north and east; Halton north of the River Mersey; most of West Lancashire[68] Liverpool Cathedral[69] 1880
London
(Bishop)
Canterbury The City of London; Greater London north of the River Thames except part of the east and north; Surrey north of the Thames; part of Hertfordshire[70] St Paul's Cathedral[71] 601
Manchester
(Bishop)
York Manchester except part of the south; Salford; Bolton; Bury; Rochdale; Oldham; the western half of Tameside; part of Wigan, Trafford, Stockport, and southern Lancashire[72] Manchester Cathedral[73] 1848
Newcastle
(Bishop)
York Northumberland; Newcastle upon Tyne; North Tyneside; part of eastern Cumbria; part of County Durham[74] Newcastle Cathedral[75] 1882
Norwich
(Bishop)
Canterbury Norfolk except part of the west; part of northeastern Suffolk[76] Norwich Cathedral[77] 1096
Oxford
(Bishop)
Canterbury Oxfordshire; Berkshire; Buckinghamshire; part of Hampshire and Hertfordshire[78] Christ Church Cathedral[79] 1542
Peterborough
(Bishop)
Canterbury Northamptonshire except part of the west; Rutland; Peterborough except part of the southeast; part of Lincolnshire[80] Peterborough Cathedral[81] 1541
Portsmouth
(Bishop)
Canterbury The southeastern third of Hampshire; the Isle of Wight[82] Portsmouth Cathedral[83] 1927
Rochester
(Bishop)
Canterbury Kent west of the River Medway except part of the southwest; Medway; most of Bromley Bexley; part of East Sussex[84] Rochester Cathedral[85] 604
St Albans
(Bishop)
Canterbury Hertfordshire except part of the south and west; Bedfordshire except part of the north and west; part of Greater London[86] St Albans Cathedral[87] 1877
St Edmundsbury and Ipswich
(Bishop)
Canterbury Suffolk except part of the northeast; part of Essex[88] St Edmundsbury Cathedral[89] 1914
Salisbury
(Bishop)
Canterbury The southern three quarters of Wiltshire; Dorset except part of the east; part of Hampshire and Devon[90] Salisbury Cathedral[91] 1078
Sheffield
(Bishop)
York Sheffield; Rotherham; Doncaster except part of the southeast; part of North Lincolnshire; part of northeastern Barnsley; part of the East Riding of Yorkshire[92] Sheffield Cathedral[93] 1914
Sodor and Man
(Bishop)
York The Isle of Man[94] Peel Cathedral 1400c. 1400 (English jurisdiction)
447 (first founded)[95]
Southwark
(Bishop)
Canterbury Greater London south of the River Thames except most of Bromley and Bexley and part of the southwest; the eastern third of Surrey[96] Southwark Cathedral[97] 1905
Southwell and Nottingham
(Bishop)
York Nottinghamshire; part of South Yorkshire[98] Southwell Minster[99] 1884
Truro
(Bishop)
Canterbury Cornwall; the Isles of Scilly; part of Devon[100] Truro Cathedral[101] 1877
Winchester
(Bishop)
Canterbury Hampshire except the southeastern quarter and part of the northeast, west, and north; part of eastern Dorset; the Channel Islands[102] Winchester Cathedral[103] 662
Worcester
(Bishop)
Canterbury Worcestershire except part of the south and north; part of Wolverhampton, Sandwell, and northern Gloucestershire[104] Worcester Cathedral[105] 680
York
(Archbishop)
York York; East Riding of Yorkshire except part of the southwest; Kingston upon Hull; Redcar and Cleveland; Middlesbrough; the eastern half of North Yorkshire; Stockton-on-Tees south of the River Tees; part of Leeds[106] York Minster[107] 625

Statistics

Source:[108][109] Diocese of Europe excluded.

Diocese Population Area (sq. m.) Pop. density1 Benefices Parishes Churches People per church
Bath & Wells 969,000 1,610 600 179 461 559 1,730
Birmingham 1,591,000 290 5,420 138 151 184 8,650
Blackburn 1,363,000 930 1,470 173 235 271 5,030
Bristol 1,042,000 470 2,210 103 165 201 5,180
Canterbury 1,155,000 1,050 1,100 136 242 360 3,210
Carlisle 498,000 2,570 190 107 233 330 1,510
Chelmsford 3,253,000 1,530 2,120 307 470 576 5,650
Chester 1,651,000 1,030 1,600 215 265 342 4,830
Chichester 1,711,000 1,450 1,180 275 359 475 3,600
Coventry 905,000 700 1,300 127 205 242 3,740
Derby 1,069,000 990 1,080 141 255 313 3,410
Durham 1,498,000 980 1,530 173 209 264 5,670
Ely 767,000 1,530 500 145 302 328 2,340
Exeter 1,199,000 2,570 470 153 489 595 2,020
Gloucester 678,000 1,130 600 91 297 381 1,780
Guildford 1,068,000 530 2,010 141 160 211 5,060
Hereford 333,000 1,650 200 81 338 402 830
Leeds 2,765,000 2,630 1,050 278 450 597 4,630
Leicester 1,066,000 830 1,280 107 245 311 3,430
Lichfield 2,185,000 1,730 1,260 239 421 544 4,020
Lincoln 1,091,000 2,670 410 181 484 625 1,750
Liverpool 1,623,000 390 4,120 121 173 236 6,880
London 4,390,000 280 15,900 411 403 475 9,240
Manchester 2,202,000 420 5,310 180 256 316 6,970
Newcastle 835,000 2,100 400 123 170 238 3,510
Norwich 923,000 1,800 510 164 554 640 1,440
Oxford 2,415,000 2,210 1,090 289 608 811 2,980
Peterborough 935,000 1,140 820 125 348 379 2,470
Portsmouth 792,000 420 1,890 107 133 167 4,740
Rochester 1,375,000 540 2,560 180 215 259 5,310
Salisbury 963,000 2,050 470 135 433 566 1,700
Sheffield 1,308,000 610 2,130 147 174 208 6,290
Sodor & Man 92,000 220 420 14 15 39 2,350
Southwark 2,899,000 320 9,020 257 294 355 8,170
Southwell & Nottingham 1,165,000 840 1,380 150 228 296 3,940
St Albans 1,942,000 1,120 1,740 195 337 407 4,770
St Eds & Ipswich 682,000 1,430 480 115 446 479 1,420
Truro 573,000 1,390 410 104 213 301 1,900
Winchester 1,242,000 1,130 1,100 139 253 357 3,480
Worcester 899,000 670 1,340 90 168 274 3,280
York 1,452,000 2,670 540 233 443 582 2,490

1persons per square mile

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e "Dioceses". Church of England. Retrieved 17 August 2014.
  2. ^ Avis 2013; Podmore 2005, pp. 82–83; Weaver & Brakke 2008, p. 266.
  3. ^ "Church Locations". Diocese in Europe. Retrieved 17 August 2014.
  4. ^ Ren 2011, p. 110.
  5. ^ Mullett 2010, p. 11.
  6. ^ Cormack 1984, p. 8.
  7. ^ Galloway 1999, p. 118.
  8. ^ a b "First New Diocese for More than 85 Years Created on April 20". The Transformation Programme for The Diocese of West Yorkshire and the Dales (Press release). 15 April 2014. Archived from the original on 20 April 2014. Retrieved 16 June 2016.
  9. ^ Wilson 2013, p. 281.
  10. ^ "Cathedral Time". Christ Church, Oxford. 2000. Archived from the original on December 6, 2004.
  11. ^ "List of all Bishops". Crockfords. Archbishops' Council. Archived from the original on 19 April 2005. Retrieved 18 August 2014.
  12. ^ "Diocesan Arms". Trinity Amblecote. Retrieved 18 August 2014.
  13. ^ "List of cathedrals". Crockfords. Archbishops' Council. Archived from the original on 20 April 2005. Retrieved 18 August 2014.
  14. ^ Tate 1969, p. 334.
  15. ^ The Church of England Year Book 2014, p. 5.
  16. ^ Historic England. "Wells Cathedral  (196971)". Research records (formerly PastScape). Retrieved 16 June 2016.
  17. ^ Livingstone, Sparks & Peacocke 2013, p. 55.
  18. ^ The Church of England Year Book 2014, p. 9.
  19. ^ Foster 2005, p. 40.
  20. ^ Jones 2012, p. 27.
  21. ^ The Church of England Year Book 2014, p. 12.
  22. ^ Pepin 2004, p. 38.
  23. ^ "No. 33220". The London Gazette. 12 November 1926. p. 7321.
  24. ^ The Church of England Year Book 2014, p. 18.
  25. ^ The Monthly Review from May to August Inclusive. Hurst & Robinson. 1830. p. 141.
  26. ^ Nicholls & Taylor 1881, p. 239.
  27. ^ The Church of England Year Book 2014, p. 21.
  28. ^ Weaver & Caviness 2013, p. 11.
  29. ^ Cummings 2007, p. 1.
  30. ^ The Church of England Year Book 2014, p. 25.
  31. ^ Bond 2007, p. 43.
  32. ^ Livingstone, Sparks & Peacocke 2013, p. 95.
  33. ^ The Church of England Year Book 2014, p. 28.
  34. ^ Pepin 2004, p. 50.
  35. ^ The Church of England Year Book 2014, p. 32.
  36. ^ Pepin 2004, p. 52.
  37. ^ "Insignia and shield of the Diocese". Diocese of Chichester. Retrieved 18 August 2014.
  38. ^ The Church of England Year Book 2014, p. 35.
  39. ^ Pepin 2004, p. 55.
  40. ^ The Church of England Year Book 2014, p. 38.
  41. ^ Pepin 2004, p. 58.
  42. ^ The Church of England Year Book 2014, p. 41.
  43. ^ Pepin 2004, p. 60.
  44. ^ "No. 33290". The London Gazette. 1 July 1927. p. 4207.
  45. ^ The Church of England Year Book 2014, p. 45.
  46. ^ Pepin 2004, p. 62.
  47. ^ The Church of England Year Book 2014, p. 49.
  48. ^ Pepin 2004, p. 65.
  49. ^ The Church of England Year Book 2014, p. 52.
  50. ^ "The Cathedral of The Holy Trinity Gibraltar". Cathedral of the Holy Trinity, Gibraltar. Retrieved 1 October 2014.
  51. ^ "Our History". Diocese in Europe. Archived from the original on 3 June 2016. Retrieved 17 June 2016.
  52. ^ The Church of England Year Book 2014, p. 55.
  53. ^ Pepin 2004, p. 68.
  54. ^ The Church of England Year Book 2014, p. 60.
  55. ^ Pepin 2004, p. 70.
  56. ^ The Church of England Year Book 2014, p. 63.
  57. ^ Pepin 2004, p. 73.
  58. ^ The Church of England Year Book 2014, p. 66.
  59. ^ Pepin 2004, p. 75.
  60. ^ "Maps and Information about Deaneries and Parishes". Diocese of Leeds. Retrieved 13 July 2016.
  61. ^ "The Dioceses of Bradford, Ripon and Leeds and Wakefield Reorganisation Scheme 2013" (PDF). Church of England. 2013. p. 4. Archived from the original (PDF) on 20 February 2014. Retrieved 1 October 2014.
  62. ^ The Church of England Year Book 2014, p. 69.
  63. ^ Pepin 2004, p. 77.
  64. ^ The Church of England Year Book 2014, p. 73.
  65. ^ Pepin 2004, p. 79.
  66. ^ The Church of England Year Book 2014, p. 77.
  67. ^ Pepin 2004, p. 82.
  68. ^ The Church of England Year Book 2014, p. 80.
  69. ^ Pepin 2004, p. 84.
  70. ^ The Church of England Year Book 2014, p. 83.
  71. ^ Pepin 2004, p. 90.
  72. ^ The Church of England Year Book 2014, p. 87.
  73. ^ Pepin 2004, p. 93.
  74. ^ The Church of England Year Book 2014, p. 91.
  75. ^ Pepin 2004, p. 95.
  76. ^ The Church of England Year Book 2014, p. 94.
  77. ^ Pepin 2004, p. 99.
  78. ^ The Church of England Year Book 2014, p. 97.
  79. ^ Pepin 2004, p. 103.
  80. ^ The Church of England Year Book 2014, p. 101.
  81. ^ Pepin 2004, p. 108.
  82. ^ The Church of England Year Book 2014, p. 105.
  83. ^ Pepin 2004, p. 110.
  84. ^ The Church of England Year Book 2014, p. 112.
  85. ^ Pepin 2004, p. 115.
  86. ^ The Church of England Year Book 2014, p. 115.
  87. ^ Pepin 2004, p. 118.
  88. ^ The Church of England Year Book 2014, p. 118.
  89. ^ Pepin 2004, p. 123.
  90. ^ The Church of England Year Book 2014, p. 121.
  91. ^ Pepin 2004, p. 126.
  92. ^ The Church of England Year Book 2014, p. 124.
  93. ^ Pepin 2004, p. 129.
  94. ^ The Church of England Year Book 2014, p. 127.
  95. ^ Buchanan 2006, p. 288.
  96. ^ The Church of England Year Book 2014, p. 129.
  97. ^ Pepin 2004, p. 131.
  98. ^ The Church of England Year Book 2014, p. 133.
  99. ^ Pepin 2004, p. 133.
  100. ^ The Church of England Year Book 2014, p. 136.
  101. ^ Pepin 2004, p. 135.
  102. ^ The Church of England Year Book 2014, p. 143.
  103. ^ Pepin 2004, p. 142.
  104. ^ The Church of England Year Book 2014, p. 147.
  105. ^ Pepin 2004, p. 145.
  106. ^ The Church of England Year Book 2014, p. 150.
  107. ^ Pepin 2004, p. 147.
  108. ^ "Dioceses". www.crockford.org.uk. Retrieved 2017-10-22.
  109. ^ https://www.churchofengland.org/sites/default/files/2020-10/2019StatisticsForMission.pdf

Bibliography

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  • Buchanan, Colin (2006). Historical Dictionary of Anglicanism. Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield. ISBN 978-0-8108-6506-8.
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  • Cummings, Owen F. (2007). Canterbury Cousins: The Eucharist in Contemporary Anglican Theology. Mahwah, New Jersey: Paulist Press. ISBN 978-0-8091-4490-7.
  • Foster, Andy (2005). Birmingham. New Haven, Connecticut: Yale University Press. ISBN 978-0-300-10731-9.
  • Galloway, Peter (1999). A Passionate Humility: Frederick Oakeley and the Oxford Movement. Leominster, England: Gracewing Publishing. ISBN 978-0-85244-506-8.
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  • Livingstone, E. A.; Sparks, M. W. D.; Peacocke, R. W., eds. (2013). The Concise Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (3rd ed.). Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-965962-3.
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  • Pepin, David (2004). Discovering Cathedrals. Oxford: Osprey Publishing. ISBN 978-0-7478-0597-7.
  • Podmore, Colin (2005). Aspects of Anglican Identity. London: Church House Publishing. ISBN 978-0-7151-4074-1.
  • Ren, C. H. (2011). Christianity and the Future. Thomas Nelson. ISBN 978-1-4497-1380-5.
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  • Weaver, Jeffrey; Caviness, Madeline H. (2013). The Ancestors of Christ Windows at Canterbury Cathedral. Los Angeles: Getty Publications. ISBN 978-1-60606-146-6.
  • Weaver, Mary Jo; Brakke, David (2008). Introduction to Christianity (4th ed.). Cengage Learning. ISBN 978-0-495-09726-6.
  • Wilson, Fiona M. (2013). Organizational Behaviour and Work: A Critical Introduction. Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-964598-5.

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